March 2018 events calendar for Chicago

Plan out your March in Chicago with our calendar of the best things to do, including picks from theater, art and music
St. Patrick's Day Parade 2017
Photograph: Neal O'Bryan
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March in Chicago conjures one color: green. From the river to the drunk people to the junk at drug stores, Chicago does not skimp on the St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. But March also marks the creaky beginnings of spring—little blades of grass peeking out here and there, light(er) jackets, melting snow. But don’t get your hopes up; you probably won't experience outdoor bar weather quite yet. Because as they say, Chicago comes in like a lion, and goes out like… well, like a drunk lion. Start planning your month with our March 2018 events calendar for Chicago.

RECOMMENDED: Events calendar for Chicago in 2018

Featured events in March 2018

St. Patrick's Day Parade 2017
Photograph: Neal O'Bryan
Things to do

The best St. Patrick's Day events in Chicago

St. Patrick’s Day: When all Chicagoans are Irish. Of course, we have a huge Irish-American population here in Chicago, but you don’t need to be from the isles to have a good time on March 17. Check out our complete guide of ways to celebrate the holiday and maybe you'll get lucky. 

Concerts in March 2018

Yonatan Gat
Photograph: Bryan Parker
Music, Rock and indie

Yonatan Gat + Health&Beauty

Guitarist Yonatan Gat is one of the most visceral performers out there, and it's not just because of his versatile six-string chops—which lend themselves to everything from psychedelic rock to avant-garde jazz. At the head of his three-piece band, Gat typically eschews the stage in favor of playing in the middle of the audience, allowing his winding compositions to feed off the energy of tightly-packed bodies.

Tyler, the Creator
Photograph: Mark Peckmezian
Music, Rap, hip-hop and R&B

Tyler, The Creator + Vince Staples

Tyler, the Creator owes much of his current success to the controversy that he generated as the sophomoric figurehead of Odd Future, the California hip-hop collective that includes Earl Sweatshirt and Frank Ocean. On Flower Boy, Tyler moves beyond the shocking (and often problematic) rhymes that populated his early records, taking a more confessional tone about the nature of race and sexuality. But no matter how insightful Tyler gets, his live shows probably aren't going to be any less anarchic.

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Tune-Yards
Photograph: Eliot Lee Hazel
Music, Rock and indie

Tune-Yards + Sudan Archives

Merrill Garbus once again embraces funky Afrobeat rhythms and hair-raising vocals on her latest album, I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life, but the record itself is wracked with a sense of guilt. Confronting her own white privilege and cultural appropriation, the latest iteration of Tune-Yards seems at odds with its past, stripping away the neon face paint and carefree word-association in favor of music that makes a calculated attempt to empathize. 

MGMT
Photograph: Courtesy Columbia Records
Music, Rock and indie

MGMT

While songs like "Kids" and "Time to Pretend" have become cultural touchstones for millennials, MGMT has always seemed insistent on defying expectations on its ensuing albums. After writing much of their debut while they were college students, Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser opted to explore psych-rock and trippy studio trickery. A five-year hiatus hasn't softened MGMT's stubborn tendencies—Little Dark Age is another psychedelic opus with a few nods to the group's synth-pop prowess.

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Miguel
Photograph: Courtesy the artist
Music, Rap, hip-hop and R&B

Miguel + Sir + Nonchalant Savant

Following in the footsteps of Prince, R&B crooner Miguel makes smooth, sexy music that doesn't shy away from allusions to the current political climate (not to mention the heat he's packing beneath those tight leather trousers). On War & Leisure, he juxtaposes carnal pleasures with global unrest—his sultry anthems invite listeners to unwind and enjoy themselves, but the specter of conflict and unease is always present. He may not be topping the charts, but Miguel's music stays unflinchingly true to his seductive vision.

Pussy Riot
Photograph: Courtesy the artist
Music, Punk and metal

Pussy Riot

Balaclava-clad Russian punk rockers Pussy Riot made headlines in 2012, when the group staged a guerrilla performance in a Moscow church that resulted in the arrest of several members. Now the feminist art collective is hitting the road for its first U.S. tour, bringing its “live music performance art” to Subterranean and Beat Kitchen. The band's current lineup includes Nadya Tolokonnikova, who previously appeared on a panel discussion of the group's legacy at Riot Fest in 2014.

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Alex Cameron
Photograph: Chris Rhodes
Music, Rock and indie

Alex Cameron + Molly Burch

The music industry is a sleazy business filled with shady characters, but nobody embraces its seediness quite like Alex Cameron. The Australian singer-songwriter (who formerly played with Sydney electronic act Seekae) performs in character, writing self-aware songs from the perspective of internet porn addicts and wanna-be alpha males. Accompanied by saxophonist and business partner Roy Malloy, Cameron takes his musical satire seriously, building ‘80-inflected synth-pop arrangements that are as compelling as the narratives he weaves.

Ty Dolla $ign
Photograph: Courtesy the artist
Music, Rap, hip-hop and R&B

Ty Dolla $ign

Even if you’ve never actually listened to one of his records, you’ve heard Ty Dolla $ign’s silky R&B vocals on tracks by the likes of Kanye West, Vince Staples and Lupe Fiasco. In the increasingly competitive world of computer-pitched hook singers for hire, he's one of the most prolific. The L.A. crooner shows off his versatility on his latest album, Beach House 3, which includes sultry takes on reggae and trap music.

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Demi Lovato
Photograph: Courtesy Island Records
Music, Pop

Demi Lovato + DJ Khaled + Kehlani

What do you get when you pair one of the most reliable modern pop divas with a ridiculously-connected music mogul who loves shouting his own name? You might think the answer is “a hit single,” but it's actually a co-headlining arena tour that finds Demi Lovato and DJ Khaled sharing the stage. To be honest, we're looking forward to earworm anthem “Sorry Not Sorry” far more than any song that features Khaled shouting “We the best music!”

Pink at Madison Square Garden
Photograph: Chris La Putt
Music, Pop

Pink

Pink (or P!nk) has long been a pop-star in consciously-edgy clothes, armed with up-tempo tracks and heartwrenching ballads that show off her formidable vocal range. Touring behind her latest LP, Beautiful Trauma, Pink is cooking up another thrilling arena show that—if her building-scaling AMA stunt is any indication—will be filled with propulsive beats and hunky acrobats stunt-dancing from bungee cords.

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Comedy in March 2018

Comedians You Should Know
Photograph: Melissa Mamroth
Comedy, Stand-up

Comedians You Should Know

icon-location-pin Timothy O'Toole's, Streeterville
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This weekly night of comedy, curated by a group of funny folks, puts local stand-ups on your radar. Producers include stand-ups Danny Kallas, Joe Kilgallon, Ricky Gonzalez, Allison Dunne, Jonah Jurkens and Blake Burkhart, but the lineup changes each week.

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