Pitchfork Music Festival 2017 aftershow guide

After Union Park closes its gate, the live music continues at these Pitchfork Music Festival aftershows
Thurston Moore
Photograph: Vera Marmelo
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You can't throw a summer music festival without lining up a slate of late-night concerts that keep the party going long after the gates close. Pitchfork Music Festival keeps the tradition alive by allowing some of the best acts on the lineup to perform at nearby Chicago music venues. This year, you'll be able to see noted emo act American Football turn in a set at the Empty Bottle or ease into the festival weekend with the six-string wizardy of guitarist William Tyler at Constellation. Plan your post-fest itinerary with our guide to Pitchfork Music Festival aftershows.

RECOMMENDED: Our complete guide to the Pitchfork Music Festival

Pitchfork Music Festival 2017 aftershows

Thurston Moore Band took the stage on day two of Riot Fest, September 12, 2015.
Photograph: Carolina Mariana Rodriguez
Music, Rock and indie

Thurston Moore Group

Erstwhile Sonic Youth frontman (and now London dwelling expat) Thurston Moore brings his latest barrage of distortion to life with the help of his eponymous band. His recent Rock N Roll Consciousness is a return to the expansive guitar-driven compositions of his past, filled with familiar riffs and outbursts of unbridled noise that don't really require the sparse vocal accompaniment that Moore provides. Sonic Youth isn't going to reunite anytime soon, so seeing Moore take the stage with Steve Shelley is probably the next best thing.

Jamila Woods
Photograph: Courtesy the artist
Music, Rap, hip-hop and R&B

Jamila Woods

Chicago poet Jamila Woods already has a way with words, but her solo debut, HEAVN, deomnstrates her equally masterful command of melody and rhythm. Her soulful voice oversees a collection of songs that confront the racial inequality and divides present within her city, without losing sight of the underlying beauty of the place she calls home. At this Pitchfork Music Festival pre-show, Woods turns in an 'in the round' performance on the floor of Thalia Hall with support from Malcolm London and DJ Rae Chardonnay.

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William Tyler
Photograph: Angelina Castillo
Music, Rock and indie

William Tyler + Fielded

Nashville guitarist William Tyler gets lumped in with American Primitive finger pickers, but his latest album, Modern Country, is an adventurous, genre-blending affair. Backed by a band, he turns out sprawling instrumentals that draw upon krautrock rhythms and the contemporary arrangements of composer Steve Reich. Self-taught Brooklyn electronic producer Fielded supports at this Pitchfork Music Festival aftershow.

Music, Rock and indie

Cherry Glazerr

L.A.'s Cherry Glazerr, fronted by singer-songwriter Clementine Creevy, takes its name from KCRW radio host Chery Glaser. Why? Who knows—which is indicative of the pop-punk band's goofy, bratty sensibilities. On Apocalipstick, the trio delivers some of its most explosive tunes to date, indulging in fiery riffs and grandiose synth melodies that sonically impart just how much fun this group is having.

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Music, Rap, hip-hop and R&B

Joey Purp + Southside (808 Mafia) + Kami

A founding member of Chicago's Savemoney hip-hop collective, Joey Purp recent mixtape iiiDrops proved that he's one of the most proficient rappers in the crew. While his collaborations with Chance the Rapper and Mick Jenkins garner the most attention, Purp's slick wordplay can easily hold down a feature-less track. At this Pitchfork Music Festival aftershow, he'll be supported by local MC's Southside (808 Mafia), Kami and Valee.

Music, Rock and indie

Ne-Hi + Parent

The jangling refrains of Chicago indie-rock quartet Ne-Hi traffic in pre-mature nostalgia, wistfully looking back on (relatively) recent youthful dalliances on the band's latest single, "Stay Young." The group's sophomore LP, Offers, provides a bittersweet soundtrack to cracking open beers with a friend as the sun sets on a beautiful summer day. More than any other promising young band in the city, Ne-Hi's barrage of reverberating guitars and wistful lyricism fosters a very specific feeling. Local indie-pop act Parent opens this Pitchfork Music Festival aftershow.

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Priests
Photograph: Audrey Melton
Music, Punk and metal

Priests

Adhering to the DIY, punk rock ethos of Fugazi, Washington D.C. quartet Priests are known for blistering live performances that amp up songs from the band's self-released records. On its latest album, Nothing Feels Natural, the group weaves together a collection of poised tracks that provide a visceral perspective on the uncertain state of modern life without getting lost in its minutia.

Vagabon
Photograph: Courtesy the artist
Music, Rock and indie

Vagabon + Tasha

Brooklyn singer-songwriter Lætitia Tamko makes DIY music that sounds like her Bushwick contemporaries, but she's singing about subjects that aren't typically represented in the genre. The noisy, cathartic tracks that populate Tamko's latest album, Infinite Worlds, are written from her unique perspective: a young black woman finding her voice and unpacking some complicated emotions in the predominantly white world of indie rock. Chicago R&B artist Tasha opens this Pitchfork Music Festival aftershow.

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Music, Rock and indie

American Football

Downstate Illinois band American Football released a single self-titled album in 1999, but group's combination of emo songcraft and post-rock instrumentation has cemented it as a cult classic. Brothers Mike and Nate Kinsella made lightning strike twice when they reunited the group last year to cut another self-titled LP (much to the chagrin of record store clerks everywhere). After its Sunday afternoon set at Pitchfork Music Festival, American Football heads back inside for this intimate Empty Bottle set.

Music, Punk and metal

Jeff Rosenstock + Laura Stevenson

Once the lead singer of ska-punk act the Arrogant Sons of Bitches, Jeff Rosenstock has found his calling as an aging pop-punk troubadour. His latest album, WORRY., confronts middle-age with a laundry list of complaints and observations (gentrification, financial insecurity, etc.) set to melodic power chord refrains. This is punk for the 30+ set, but it's catchy enough to resonate with the kids—that's what they call diversifying your audience. Long Island rocker Laura Stevenson opens this Pitchfork Music Festival aftershow.

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Music, Jazz

Colin Stetson + Justin Walter

You may have seen saxophonist Colin Stetson playing with the touring lineups of acts like Bon Iver, Arcade Fire and the National—apparently circular breathers are a hot commodity in indie rock. As a solo artist, Stetson is known for coaxing otherworldly sounds out of his woodwind, such as the rhythmic groans and squawks that populate his latest album, All This I Do For Glory. During this Pitchfork Music Festival aftershow at Constellation, he'll be joined by Justin Walter, who performs with a rare, wind-controlled analog synthesizer. 

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