Zach Long joined Time Out Chicago in 2014 and served as the publication's editor until 2022.

Zach Long

Zach Long

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Articles (385)

The 27 most stunning pieces of public art in Chicago

The 27 most stunning pieces of public art in Chicago

There's no shortage of amazing creative works in Chicago's best museums, but you don't need a ticket to see the best public art in Chicago. With pieces on display throughout the city, you can head to the Loop to see the reflective Cloud Gate and Picasso's sculpture in Daley Plaza or visit Pilsen to take in the 16th Street Murals or the colorful home of artist Hector Duarte. In fact, there's more public art in Chicago than you'll be able to experience in a single day (and much more than we can round up in a single article), so we've listed some of our favorite pieces that you can always visit free of charge. RECOMMENDED: Discover the best things to do in Chicago

Where to watch the Chicago Air and Water Show 2024

Where to watch the Chicago Air and Water Show 2024

The Chicago Air and Water Show returns to the city's skies on August 10 and 11 (in addition to practice runs the day before), presenting a series of death-defying jet flyovers above the lakefront. Want a front-row seat to the aerial action? You can't go wrong with claiming a spot at Chicago beaches—especially those located between Fullerton Avenue and Oak Street, where the show is centered—but those looking for an enhanced experience can also attend viewing parties at waterfront restaurants and rooftop bars, or even get out on the water for a boat tour. We've split this guide into four sections: restaurants, beaches, skyscrapers and boats, so no matter your preference, you'll find the preferred vantage point for watching the Chicago Air and Water Show. RECOMMENDED: Your complete guide to the Chicago Air and Water Show

The 32 best Chicago attractions

The 32 best Chicago attractions

Chicago might be the Second City, but our attractions are first class. Need proof? Just take a look at the many Chicago museums, where you'll find everything from the best-preserved T.Rex skeleton ever discovered, to paintings from Van Gogh and Picasso. Or if nature's more your thing, take a walk through the mesmerizing parks and gardens, home to some of the best public art in Chicago (hello, The Bean). You can also spend a day swimming in Lake Michigan's surprisingly huge freshwater waves at one of the many Chicago beaches, see a jazz show at a bar once frequented by Al Capone, or have a Michelin-starred meal at one of the best Chicago restaurants... the list goes on. Whether it's your first time on Chicago or you want to see more of the city you live in, check out our curated list of the best attractions in Chicago. RECOMMENDED: ❀ The best things to do in Chicago right now💾 The best cheap things to do in Chicago🏹 The best hotels in ChicagođŸ© The best boutique hotels in Chicago This guide was written by Zach Long, an editor based in Chicago. At Time Out, all of our travel guides are written by local writers who know their cities inside out. For more about how we curate, see our editorial guidelines.

The best jazz clubs in Chicago

The best jazz clubs in Chicago

Chicago can't claim to be the birthplace of jazz, but it's undeniably a city where the genre is thriving and evolving. The home of Down Beat Magazine and the fabled AACM collective, Chicago has pushed the art form in new directions for decades. While summer music festivals like the Chicago Jazz Festival and the Hyde Park Jazz Festival demonstrate the community's breadth and prowess, it's the small jazz clubs that keep the music alive throughout the year. Some of the city's best bars are places where saxophones and improvised music dominate the calendar, introducing audiences to living legends and rising talent. Whether you prefer swing, bop, acid or free jazz, you'll find something to tap your foot along to at Chicago's best jazz clubs. RECOMMENDED: Discover the best bars in Chicago open until 4am

The best drive-in movie theaters near Chicago

The best drive-in movie theaters near Chicago

Over the past couple of years, Chicagoans have reconnected with the romantic summer tradition of the drive-in. While you can definitely grab some popcorn and still catch an outdoor movie in a park, a summer blockbuster at the best movie theaters in Chicago or even a cult classic on a Fulton Market rooftop, there's still something to be said for the feeling of pulling up to the big screen, setting up a tailgate-style spread with friends or getting cozy for a unique date at the drive-in. Whether you want to make the trip to McHenry or see a movie in a Pilsen parking lot, the best drive-in theaters near Chicago are worth checking out. Just make sure those windshields are clean. RECOMMENDED: The best dine-in movie theaters in Chicago

The 37 best restaurants in Chicago you have to try in 2024

The 37 best restaurants in Chicago you have to try in 2024

July 2024: On our latest roundup of the city's best eateries, we're welcoming West Town restaurant, cafe and marketplace Nettare. Also joining it are two old favorites that have recently reopened—Calumet Fisheries and Khmai. Many of the city's best chefs and restaurants are in Time Out Market Chicago as well, and you can scroll through the full vendor lineup at the bottom of this page. The best restaurants in Chicago come in all shapes and sizes, from pizza joints and Michelin-starred heavyweights to some of the best cheap eats Chicago has to offer. The cuisines are just as varied, with every corner of the globe represented through Korean, Mexican, Italian, Mediterranean and Japanese fare. Whether you're a lifelong resident or simply visiting for the weekend, stuffing your face at one of these restaurants is easily among the best things to do in Chicago. This belt-busting food scene shows no signs of slowing down, so we cut to the chase and ranked our essentials—the absolute best restaurants in town. Our editors scour the city for great dishes, excellent value and insider info. We hope to provide an authentic snapshot of Chicago's ever-evolving dining experiences by updating this list constantly with the best new restaurants in the city as well as decades-old stalwarts that keep us coming back for more. It could be a mega-hyped destination restaurant or a remarkable hole in the wall: If it’s on the list, we think it’s terrific, and we bet you will, too. Many of the city's bes

Your guide to the food and drink at Time Out Market Chicago—and how to order

Your guide to the food and drink at Time Out Market Chicago—and how to order

There's a lot going on inside Time Out Market Chicago, the 50,000-square-foot food and cultural epicenter located at 916 W Fulton Market in the heart of the West Loop. The building is home to editorially-curated eateries from some of Chicago's top chefs, several world-class bars, a state-of-the-art demonstration kitchen and an impressive all-season rooftop terrace. We'll give you a second to catch your breath. Whether you want to order in person or take advantage of mobile ordering, there are several options for getting your hands on some delicious food and drink. With mobile ordering, you can transform your dining experience by skipping the lines and ordering from several kitchens in one seamless transaction. Staff will even bring the food directly to your table! Speaking of food, there's plenty to explore, with menu options that run the gamut from stacked burgers and mouthwatering smoked meats to fresh sushi and over-the-top milkshakes. Take a closer look at all of our chef and beverage options, and visit Time Out Market Chicago in the West Loop.

The best bike trails in Chicago for a long ride

The best bike trails in Chicago for a long ride

Chicagoans love to look at Chicago and, sometimes, bike trails have some of the most unique views. The Lakefront Trail, one of our most celebrated gems that sees millions of foot and cycling traffic each year, is a must for any visitor or Chicagoan. But besides the over 20 miles of lakefront views, there are hundreds of other miles of trails to explore if you're itching to ditch the stoplights and escape the city for an exciting adventure. Just outside city limits, you’ll find flat, paved paths perfect for training for your next century ride, hilly mountain biking trails that put your skills to the test and routes ideal for taking a walk. So whether you’re pedaling for exercise, adrenaline-filled drops or simply to explore the Midwest, here are the best bike trails near Chicago. RECOMMENDED: The best hiking trails near Chicago

The best late-night Chicago bars open until 4am

The best late-night Chicago bars open until 4am

When the clock hits 2am in Chicago, your night on the town doesn't have to end. While most bars in the city have to close up shop two hours after midnight, a few local watering holes are able to stay open until 4am each night (and until 5am on Saturdays!). These late–night establishments are scattered throughout the city, but you'll find dive bars, a few karaoke bars and some nightclubs where you can keep the party going until just before the sun comes up. Have a cup of coffee and peruse our list of the best Chicago bars that stay open until 4am or later. RECOMMENDED: Find the best late-night restaurants in Chicago

The 20 best Lincoln Park bars

The 20 best Lincoln Park bars

Lincoln Park truly lives up to Chicago’s “city in a garden” motto, with its massive namesake park, long stretch of beaches, and a free zoo and conservatory that provide the perfect way to spend an entire day immersed in nature. But you shouldn’t head out as soon as the sun sets. The neighborhood offers an eclectic mix of nightlife destinations, ranging from a cocktail bar offering tarot readings to a legendary blues club. You can also take in the gorgeous views of Lake Michigan from a rooftop bar or sample a vast collection of brown spirits at one of the best whiskey bars in Chicago. So take a load off and enjoy a stiff drink by checking out one of these great bars. RECOMMENDED: Discover more of the best bars in Chicago

The best wineries near Chicago for scenic sipping

The best wineries near Chicago for scenic sipping

If you’re intimidated by the extensive wine lists found at some of the best wine bars in Chicago and want to expand your knowledge, there’s no better way than going directly to the source. While a trip to Bordeaux or Napa might not be in the cards, there are plenty of Midwest wineries you can visit—during a day trip from Chicago—to tour vineyards, learn about the fermentation and aging process, and taste plenty of vinos to figure out the styles you prefer. Some of these wineries are also breweries or distilleries, serving beer, spirits, cocktails and mocktails so there’s something for everyone to enjoy. So expand your palate and have some fun on a trip to one of the best wineries near Chicago. RECOMMENDED: Boozy day trips from Chicago

The 29 best Chicago beaches

The 29 best Chicago beaches

There are few better ways to beat the heat in Chicago than by hitting one of the many sandy beaches along the shores of Lake Michigan. From the North Shore to the South Shore, there are plenty of options to choose from, whether you’re looking for a chill day of sunbathing, want to take in the skyline from a kayak or paddleboard, or love to get competitive with a game of volleyball. Make the most of summer in Chicago by packing a towel, snacks and some sunscreen and heading out early to secure a spot. If you’re really looking for vacation vibes, you can visit a waterfront restaurant serving drinks and hosting live music. Just be sure to check the water conditions before you go and consider visiting a public swimming pool if the lake is off limits. Note: Chicago's summer beach season runs through Labor Day. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in Chicago

Listings and reviews (349)

Ben Folds

Ben Folds

Happy-sack piano pop crooner Ben Folds has been on a progressive kick as of late, but still expect plenty of thumpingly fine and melodically sussed collegiate pop.

Taste of Randolph

Taste of Randolph

Taking place on the same street occupied by some of Chicago's best-known restaurants, this West Loop fest boasts six blocks of food, drinks and music. You'll find bites from more than 16 restaurants (on Randolph Street and beyond) as well as two stages packed with performances throughout the day. This year's lineup includes Local H, Lucky Boys Confusion, Ramona Flowers, Phantom Planet and more. Proceeds from the festival support the West Loop Community Organization.

Music Frozen Dancing

Music Frozen Dancing

Chicago's notorious frigid winter temperatures and the possibility of snow don't stop the Empty Bottle from throwing an outdoor concert in February. The Music Frozen Dancing block party sets up a stage outside of the Ukrainian Village rock club, fires up some heat lamps, stocks the coolers wil Goose Island beer and presents an afternoon of live music that you can take in while bundled up in your warmest winter coat. This year's lineup features local indie rock band Lifeguard, St. Louis synth punks The Mall, glam rock 'n' rollers Nancy and much more. And if you need to warm up, DJs will be playing jams inside the Empty Bottle all day long. As usual, admission to Music Frozen Dancing is free, but the Empty Bottle will collect donations for the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless at the gate.

The Listening Room at the Exchange

The Listening Room at the Exchange

3 out of 5 stars

Listening bars originated in Japan, conceived as places where guests could listen to music on expensive sound systems in acoustically-tuned rooms—and enjoy a drink or a snack while doing so. The concept has spread across the world, inspiring restaurants and bars in London and New York where the soundtrack being pumped into your ears is equally as important as the things you’re putting into your mouth. Of course, there are plenty of bars with killer audio equipment in Chicago (the new speakers at the California Clipper come to mind), but the Listening Room is one of the first restaurants to put the aural experience front and center. One of a trio of concepts that DMK Restaurants has opened on the ground floor of the historic Railway Exchange Building (designed by Daniel Burnham’s architecture firm), the Listening Room is the most understated of the three distinct sections of the Exchange. It doesn’t boast the soaring glass ceiling of the Atrium or the expansive bar and bottle-lined shelves of Theo’s. True to its name, the defining elements of the Listening Room are its turntable, record collection and hi-fi speakers. When my dining companion and I entered on a blustery winter night, we were greeted by the opening strains of “Dirty Little Girl” from Elton John’s classic album, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road. The remainder of the record played as I sipped a punch made with spiced rum and orange juice (the One Two Punch) and picked at a crusty country loaf, baked in-house at the Excha

Segnatore

Segnatore

4 out of 5 stars

CafĂ© Marie-Jeanne only inhabited the building on the northeast corner of California Avenue and Augusta Boulevard for five years, but it’s hard for me to walk into its former dining room without conjuring up memories of croque madames and duck frites. The French-inspired restaurant was one I ate at with some regularity, and it’s sudden shuttering in the midst of the pandemic was just one of many disappointing permanent closures in Chicago. But I’m happy to report that Segnatore is a worthy successor, serving creative Italian fare that maintains the approachability favored by the space’s former tenant. The blackboards that once displayed CafĂ© Marie-Jeanne’s menu are gone, replaced by vintage oil paintings, candelabras and hanging bundles of dried flowers—a decorative theme inspired by the Italian folk healers that serve as Segnatore’s namesake. While it’s not overtly telegraphed by the restaurant’s decor, Segnatore’s Italian influences comes into focus as soon as you sit down at a candlelit table and peruse a drink menu that’s predominantly sourced from the boot-shaped, from the spirits used in cocktails to a long list of wines. Order some of the cherrywood smoked olives to snack on while you decide, because there’s no shortage of options. Building on years spent serving Italian fare at spots like Three Aces and Charlatan, chef Matt Troost compiles a menu that’s reverent in its technique (particularly the handmade pasta) but decidedly playful in its presentation. No dish exempl

Jockey

Jockey

4 out of 5 stars

For three decades Clifton Collins Jr has been bringing a memorable spark to relatively small parts in everything from Capote to Pacific Rim. Jockey is his turn in the spotlight, giving the veteran character actor a nuanced lead role to inhabit in a slice-of-life racetrack drama. From the outset, it’s easy to see where the film’s narrative is headed. Collins Jr is Jackson Silva, a lifelong rider who has been racing horses for decades. His line of work has left him with a litany of serious injuries and little more to his name than the RV that he calls home. His glory days are behind him and an uncertain future lies ahead. Yet Silva is unable and unwilling to quit the only job he knows. Even when confronted with his rapidly deteriorating physical condition, an aspiring jockey who claims to be his son and the encouragement of a co-worker with his best interests at heart, he refuses to hang up the saddle or settle for a new life as a mentor.  Shot on a racetrack in Arizona with non-actors appearing alongside a small cast of professionals, Jockey brings a heightened sense of reality to the unfamiliar world of horse racing. A scene in which a group of real-world jockeys rattle off the injuries they’ve sustained is particularly harrowing, providing a stark reminder of the traumas that come with the turf. Finally, Clifton Collins Jr gets his turn in the spotlight  While the script from writer-director ​​Clint Bentley is disjointed at times, most of the rough edges are smoothed over by

Semilla’s Latin Kitchen

Semilla’s Latin Kitchen

3 out of 5 stars

The stretch of Sheridan Road that borders Loyola University's campus in Rogers Park has long been home to student-friendly restaurants like Blaze Pizza and Taco Bell. Located just up the street (near local institutions like the New 400 Theater) Semilla’s Latin Kitchen casts a wider net—there’s a daily happy hour that caters to frugal undergrads and a sizable menu for diners seeking something more authentic than a Cheesy Gordita Crunch. Husband-and-wife co-owners Jose Roque and Patricia Norabuena are Chicago restaurant industry veterans—Roque was a founding partner at Wicker Park’s Amaru, while Norabuena formerly worked in the kitchen at the Pump Room. The menu at Semilla’s Latin Kitchen draws on Roque and Norabuena’s respective Mexican and Peruvian heritages, packed with dishes that demonstrate hallmarks of each country’s cuisine. Take one look at the appetizers served at Semilla’s and you’ll get a feel for the breadth of its offerings. There’s the hearty hummus-like tontoli (a traditional Mexican recipe that Roque’s mother often prepared) that’s made using ground cashews, pepitas and sesame seeds, served with pita bread for dipping. A Peruvian ceviche exemplifies the country’s seafood-heavy cuisine, with chunks of mahi-mahi that are likely larger than you’re accustomed to, accompanied by onion and sweet potatoes. While Semilla’s offers plenty of meat and seafood, vegetarians will appreciate a variety of dishes that make animal protein optional, including an array of quesadil

Punch Brothers

Punch Brothers

Combining bluegrass instrumentation with adventurous chamber music arrangements, the Punch Brothers make forward-looking folk music that respects traditions, but isn’t beholden to them. After a stint hosting a music-focused live show on NPR, frontman Chris Thile returns to the group reinvigorated, working on a tribute to the late Tony Rice's seminal bluegrass album Church Street Blues. Originally intended as a gift to Rice, Hell on Church Street takes his influential arrangements of songs by Bob Dylan and Gordon Lightfoot and reimagines them with plenty of mandolin, banjo and fiddle.

Courtney Barnett + Julia Jacklin

Courtney Barnett + Julia Jacklin

Armed with a sharp wit and a penchant for shredding, Australian singer-songwriter Courtney Barnett has quickly become one of indie rock's guiding lights, graduating to increasingly large festival stages and collaborating with the likes of Philadelphia rocker Kurt Vile. Her latest album, Things Take Time, Take Time, strips back some of the studio gloss of her previous release in favor of more direct songs that confront the trials of everyday life with laconic turns of phrase. "Time is money, and money is no man’s friend," she observes on the record's opening track, earnestly imparting the kind of wisdom that seems obvious, but bears repeating. Similarly eloquent singer-songwriter Julia Jacklin opens the show.

Ty Segall + Axis: Sova

Ty Segall + Axis: Sova

Like many folks, prolific rocker Ty Segall hunkered down during the COVID-19 lockdown and tried to put the downtime to good use. His 2021 release, Harmonizer, is the result of a series of solo recording sessions, during which Segall built tracks around synthesizers as well as his usual array of guitars and drums. He debuted some of his new electronics-tinged tunes at last summer's Pitchfork Music Festival and he's returning (accompanied by his Freedom Band) to perform them again during a two-night stand at Thalia Hall. Local garage rockers Axis: Sova support.

Adalina

Adalina

3 out of 5 stars

Not far from the glitzy dining and shopping destinations that line Rush Street in River North, Adalina is yet another high-profile Italian restaurant that has quickly become a hot reservation. Boasting a prominent chef (Soo Ahn, formerly of Michelin-starred Band of Bohemia) and ownership with experience running local nightclubs and steakhouses, it’s a spot with pedigree to spare. And if you enjoy a lively scene with your meal, Adalina might offer your kind of dining experience—if not, you’re in for a rude awakening. Upon entering Adalina’s second-floor dining room, it quickly became clear that my date and I would quite literally be rubbing elbows with our fellow diners (even late on a Tuesday night). Tables are crammed into the space, forcing you to squeeze through narrow lanes when you need to get up from your seat. The sheer number of people in the restaurant also makes for a noisy meal—even when my date and I moved closer to one another, it was difficult to hear above the din. I felt sympathy for the tuxedo-clad servers, all of whom clearly had to do a bit of lip-reading while taking some orders. Once we’d successfully transmitted our order to our server and food began to arrive, our first bites didn’t exactly get the meal off on the right foot. The cacio e pepe arancini made with forbidden black rice sounded great on paper, but the fried rice balls had a somewhat unpleasant gummy texture to them—at least by the time they arrived at our table. A caesar salad was laden with

Whitney

Whitney

Holiday season shows in Chicago have become something of a tradition for folk rock outfit Whitney. This year, the band is performing no less than five shows in the city where it was founded—plus an extra gig at SPACE in Evanston (Dec 11). Each of the concerts will take place at a different venue, so if you're looking to sing along to "Golden Days" in an intimate setting, you'll want to catch the band at Schubas (Dec 6), Sleeping Village (Dec 10) or the Empty Bottle (Dec 12). And if you prefer to be among a larger crowd, snag tickets to Whitney's gigs at Thalia Hall (Dec 8) and Lincoln Hall (Dec 9). Look forward to plenty of classic tunes, some interesting covers and the potential premiere of some tracks off the band's forthcoming record.

News (1561)

Here’s what it’s like to attend a concert at the Salt Shed

Here’s what it’s like to attend a concert at the Salt Shed

It’s been more than four years since the redevelopment of the Morton Salt building was announced, and plenty of folks have had their eye on the reliable Kennedy Expressway landmark’s weathered rooftop mural ever since. On Tuesday night, the first phase of the project opened to the public, as the outdoor portion of Salt Shed—Chicago’s newest music venue from the team behind Thalia Hall and the Empty Bottle—hosted its inaugural concert. Local drummer and bandleader Makaya McCraven headlined a jazz-focused bill, which included British saxophonist Nubya Garcia and the final Chicago performance from soon-to-be-disbanded avant-garde act Sons of Kemet. And while lots of people showed up to listen to the music, many were also there to take in the new venue and to try to catch a glimpse of the still-unfinished indoor portion of the Salt Shed, set to open sometime in 2023. Tuesday night’s show wasn’t sold out, so it’s unclear exactly how cramped the Salt Shed gets when it reaches its 4,000-person capacity (upcoming sold-out shows on the venue’s summer schedule will be a better test). The outdoor space feels a bit like a much smaller, standing-room-only version of the Northerly Island amphitheater, complete with concrete beneath your feet and a view of Chicago’s skyline behind the stage. Here’s what to expect when you venture to the Salt Shed this summer, from the quality of the sound (it’s pretty good) to the price of a beer (it’s kind of expensive). Photograph: Elizabeth De La Piedra

Is Chicago still one of the world’s most beautiful cities? Help us find out.

Is Chicago still one of the world’s most beautiful cities? Help us find out.

Last year, Time Out readers named Chicago the second most beautiful city in the world and the second most fun city in the world. What distinctions will the city earn this year? We'd like you take a survey to help us find out! We’ve just launched the Time Out Index 2022, our fifth annual poll of city-dwellers around the globe, and we want to find out all about life in your city post-pandemic. What’s the restaurant scene like? The bar circuit? How easy is it to date? To make friends? What do you think of the art and nightlife? Plus where, dare we say it, is the coolest part of town? How have things changed in your city now we can all detect the sweet smell of normality? For those of us who live in cities, that hint—still stronger in some places than others—of a return to the good times is a big relief. Doing stuff is why we’re here, after all. We came for the food, for the culture, for the nightlife. We came to find new friends or because our friends were already here. And many of us stuck around throughout the pandemic for all those very legit reasons, too. The survey only takes five minutes, and at the end we’ll tell you exactly how much you love your city. As ever, we’ll be using all your responses to come up with our annual rankings of the world’s best cities and coolest neighborhoods. So go ahead, do your city some justice—and take part in the ultimate stock take of city living in 2022. Ready to tell us your opinions? Take the Time Out Index survey and be brutally honest

The Chicago Bulls are throwing a street festival this summer

The Chicago Bulls are throwing a street festival this summer

Festivals and events are poised to make a big comeback this summer—and one of Chicago's most beloved teams is getting in on the fun. This morning, the Chicago Bulls announced the inaugural Bulls Fest, which will take place outside of the United Center on September 3 and 4 during Labor Day weekend. Don't worry about scoring a ticket, because this two-day event will offer free admission to all fans. The centerpiece of the street festival will be a 3v3 basketball tournament for youth, teen, adult and wheelchair basketball teams. Taking place on courts set up in one of the United Center's parking lots, you'll be able to check out games throughout the day on Saturday and Sunday. If you're interested in participating in the tournament, you can find more details about registration on the Bulls Fest 3v3 Tournament website. Just be prepared to fork over a registration fee—early-bird prices are in effect through April 30. The Bulls are also partnering with Logan Square art gallery All Star Press to host a showcase of local artists in the United Center Atrium called the "1966 Gallery," filled with creative interpretations of the Bulls brand. Next door at the Madhouse Team Store, Bulls Fest attendees will be able to purchase exclusive merchandise, with a portion of proceeds supporting Chicago Bulls Charities. Bulls Fest will also feature local food and drink vendors as well as live music throughout the weekend, including appearances from the Bucket Boys, the Bulls DJs, the Incredibulls a

Evette’s brings Lebanese cuisine to Time Out Market Chicago

Evette’s brings Lebanese cuisine to Time Out Market Chicago

As spring draws tantalizingly close, new dining options are sprouting at Time Out Market Chicago. On Wednesday, March 16, Evette's will begin serving a menu of fresh Lebanese fare in Fulton Market, including shawarma wraps, fries covered in garlic sauce and salads made with thoughtfully-sourced produce. With owner Mitchell AbouJamra at the helm, the Evette's location at Time Out Market Chicago will join the original Evette's in Lincoln Park and an outpost that serves customers at Spilt Milk in Logan Square. Recently, AbouJamra opened All Too Well in the storefront next to the original Evette's location in Lincoln Park, offering a selection of sandwiches, salads and deli items. The menu at Evette's is inspired by AbouJamra's "Teta" (Lebanese Arabic for "grandmother"), who passed down recipes built around bold Lebanese flavors. The centerpiece of the Evette's menu is chicken or beef shawarma and halloumi, served in a wrap or on a plate. You'll also be able to try Super Garlic Feta fries topped with pink garlic sauce, feta cheese and za'atar mayo as well as a Pretty Salad made with romaine, cucumber, tomatoes, red onion, feta, fried pita, pomegranate seeds and a sumac lemon dressing. “Many of our recipes have been passed down many generations, but not all of them are traditional,” AbouJamra said. “We’ve added a twist to the classic items and just like my Teta, all of our dishes are implemented with the best of intentions to optimize what our guests are eating—nourishing, tasty a

The National, Mitski and the Roots headline Pitchfork Music Festival 2022

The National, Mitski and the Roots headline Pitchfork Music Festival 2022

After making a temporary move to September in 2021, Pitchfork Music Festival will return to its usual weekend in July this summer, taking over Union Park from July 15–17. The summer music festival revealed its complete lineup this morning, including headlining acts the National (originally scheduled to perform at the canceled 2020 festival), singer-songwriter Mitski and The Tonight Show house band the Roots. RECOMMENDED: Check out photos and reviews of Pitchfork Music Festival Other notable artists on this year's lineup include symphonic rock collective Spiritualized, indie-pop outfit Japanese Breakfast, rapper Earl Sweatshirt, reunited emo rockers Karate and jazz fusion combo BadBadNotGood. Of course, there are plenty of returning acts, such as Duluth-based noisemakers Low, unpredictable hip-hop artist Tierra Whack, Welsh singer-songwriter Cate Le Bon and Danish punk rock band Iceage. Local musicians are also represented on Pitchfork's 2022 lineup, including rapper Cupcakke, singer-songwriter KAINA and hip-hop activist Noname. Former Chicagoan Jeff Parker (best known for performing with post-rock outfit Tortoise) will also appear at the festival, accompanied by his band the New Breed. “Our goal was to highlight a diverse group of artists who are taking their musical genres to new heights, and I’m proud of how it’s come together,” Pitchfork editor in chief Puja Patel said about the festival's 2022 lineup in a statement. According to a release, Pitchfork Music Festival 2022 wi

The Adler Planetarium is finally reopening this week

The Adler Planetarium is finally reopening this week

It's been nearly two years since visitors have been able to take in a show at the Grainger Sky Theater, gaze up at scale models of the planets contained in our solar system or look inside the tiny Gemini 12 capsule that brought a pair of astronauts to space and back. That will change on Friday, March 4 when Adler Planetarium officially reopens, welcoming guests back to the popular Museum Campus attraction—in fact, it's the final major Chicago institution to reopen after closing at the onset of the pandemic. Like the Field Museum and the Shedd Aquarium, masks and proof of vaccination won't be required to visit the Adler Planetarium, thanks to the repeal of Chicago's mask and vaccine mandates on February 28. A release states that Adler is "mask friendly and we strongly support your choice to wear a mask." The Alder Planetarium is also debuting new hours, open from 9am–4pm daily, except on Wednesdays when the museum will remain open until 10pm. Admission on Wednesday nights (beginning at 4pm) will be free for Illinois residents (with proof of residency), though you'll still need to reserve your complimentary tickets through the Adler Planetarium's website. Moving forward, you'll need to purchase all Adler Planetarium tickets in advance via the institution's website. There's also a new ticket option for frequent visitors: The Star Pass, which offers one year of unlimited access to Adler Planetarium exhibits, visits to the Doane Observatory and sky shows in the domed theater. A St

Bob Odenkirk on Chicago’s amazing audiences and Italian beef

Bob Odenkirk on Chicago’s amazing audiences and Italian beef

Before he helped set a template for contemporary sketch comedy with the HBO series Mr. Show with Bob and David and was cast as slimy lawyer Saul Goodman in the hit series Breaking Bad (and its subsequent spin-off, Better Call Saul), Bob Odenkirk was just a kid from Naperville, IL who got a taste of Chicago's thriving comedy scene when he attended a show at the Second City as a teenager. That formative experience—and a chance meeting with improv guru Del Close—are expanded upon in the opening chapters of Odenkirk's new memoir, Comedy Comedy Comedy Drama, which looks back on his career as a writer, comedian and unlikely action movie star. This week, Odenkirk returns to Chicago in support of his book, chatting with fellow Saturday Night Live alum Tim Meadows at the Music Box Theatre on Wednesday, March 2 during an event presented by the Chicago Humanities Festival. Ahead of his appearance, we had a quick chat with Odenkirk about his memories of Chicago and his cravings for Al's #1 Italian Beef. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.  In your mind, why was Chicago the best place to begin your career? I was very lucky to have grown up in Naperville near Chicago, and as a result have a neighbor bring me to Second City—and that was pretty much all the reason you need to start your career in Chicago, if you love comedy and sketch comedy. But the truth is, Chicago was and is a great city to start your career because it has a thriving theater scene, and people actua

Take a look inside Chicago’s “Immersive Frida Kahlo” exhibition

Take a look inside Chicago’s “Immersive Frida Kahlo” exhibition

When it was initially announced last November, the latest show at the Lighthouse ArtSpace inside the Germania Club Building was titled “Frida: Immersive Dream.” But organizers clearly decided that there's a certain amount of brand recognition after the success of “Immersive Van Gogh,” recently renaming the Frida Kahlo show to fall in line with the established “Immersive [INSERT ARTIST NAME HERE]” template. As it turns out, the initial “Immersive Dreams” descriptor was very appropriate, considering the often surreal nature of the show's source material. This set of projections celebrating Kahlo's work manages to harness the emotional and sometimes political nature of her work—in many ways, it makes better use of the experiential format than the Van Gogh display. If you attended the aforementioned Van Gogh show in Chicago, you're already familiar with the venue within the Germanic Club Building where the display is presented. I didn't notice any major changes in the space itself, which comprises two larger rooms, a pair of smaller rooms and a balcony that overlooks the largest room. No matter which room you choose to stand it, you'll see some of the same images on display, though the projections look most impressive where they're spread across the 35-feet-tall walls of the two larger rooms. The two best places to immerse yourself in the projections are still from the floor of the largest room or from the balcony that overlooks it. Admittedly, it's been more than a year since I

California Clipper is reopening with a new lounge for dancing

California Clipper is reopening with a new lounge for dancing

Beloved Humboldt Park bar the California Clipper closed during the pandemic, but the vintage light fixtures inside the tavern are glowing red once more. On Thursday, February 24, the bar's new operators Orbit Group (Good Measure, Segnatore) will open its doors for the first time since 2020, allowing guests to order a cocktail and slide into one of the red leather booths. Don't worry—not much has changed at the Clipper. “There is a fresh coat of paint, the sign has been updated and there's new carpet on the stage. Other than that the space is the same on purpose, because as far as we were concerned the space is perfect,” general manager Carly Brown explained. The one major addition is a new lounge located in the adjacent space that formerly housed coffee shop C.C. Ferns, which is currently being called "The Little Clip." Local firm Siren Betty Design handled the renovations to the space (along with some small upgrades to the main bar), building a custom sapele wood and Formica bar featuring a curved back and mirrors that echoes the design of the original bar. The lounge's old linoleum floor was replaced with a new material that matches the original's coloring and the light fixtures hanging from the ceiling were sourced from the recently shuttered Southport Lanes in Lakeview. According to Brown, the small room will pay homage to Danny's—the defunct Bucktown bar where some of the Clipper's current staff once worked—equipped with a DJ booth and an intimate space for late-night da

Snag a free Batman-themed latte this weekend

Snag a free Batman-themed latte this weekend

There's a new Batman movie opening in theaters on March 4—simply titled The Batman—and if you've seen the recent trailer, you'll know that coffee plays a role in the Dark Knight's latest cinematic outing. In fact, it seems that the new iteration of the Riddler (played by Paul Dano) is being set up as a talented barista with a knack for question mark-inspired latte art. To celebrate Robert Pattinson's upcoming turn in the point-eared cowl, local roaster Dark Matter Coffee is partnering with Warner Bros. Pictures to give away Batman-themed lattes this weekend. You'll need to head to Dark Matter's Electric Mud cafe (by the Western Blue Line station) on Saturday, February 26; Sunday February 27; or Monday, February 28 to score your free drink. From noon to 6pm each day, guests will be able to claim a gratis Batman Latte (a rather stoic honey latte with cinnamon) or a Riddler Latte (an intriguing chocolate, honey and habanero latte with cinnamon). Each drink comes topped with the Riddler question mark—made with cinnamon instead of foam—and is available on a first come, first served basis. Electric Mud will also have a selection of The Batman T-shirts, hats, puzzles and posters to give away to guests throughout the day. It's rather fitting that you'll be able to sip a dark brew fit for a Dark Knight in Chicago, where The Batman filmed several exterior shots and a motorcycle chase back in 2020. While New Yorkers might think otherwise, Chicagoans knows that our city is the real Gotha

9 Chicago chefs are nominated for the James Beard Best Chef: Great Lakes award

9 Chicago chefs are nominated for the James Beard Best Chef: Great Lakes award

For the first time since 2019, the James Beard Foundation will hold its James Beard Awards ceremony on June 13, recognizing some of the most talented chefs, bakers, bartenders, sommeliers and restauranteurs in the United States. The awards ceremony will take place at the Lyric Opera of Chicago, but the James Beard Foundation revealed its semifinalists this morning—and there are plenty of familiar faces up for awards. Chicago is well represented among the semifinalists for the Best Chef: Great Lakes award, which recognizes an outstanding chef based in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan or Ohio—a Chicago chef has taken home the award during the past four ceremonies. There are a total of nine Chicago chefs up for the 2022 Best Chef: Great Lakes award, listed below: Rodolfo Cuadros, Amaru, Bloom Plant Based Kitchen and Lil Amaru at Time Out Market Chicago Diana Dávila Boldin, Mi Tocaya Antojería Paul Fehribach, Big Jones Jason Hammel, Lula Cafe Dave Park, Jeong Darnell Reed, Luella’s Southern Kitchen Noah Sandoval, Oriole John Shields and Karen Urie Shields, Smyth Erick Williams, Virtue Restaurant & Bar The complete list of semifinalists for the Best Chef: Great Lakes award includes chefs based in Indianapolis, Detroit, Cincinnati, Dearborn, MI and Lakewood, OH. Chicago restaurants and bars are also semifinalists in other James Beard Awards categories, including Parachute and Oriole in the Outstanding Restaurant category; Kasama in the Best New Restaurant category; and Nobody's Darli

Chef Darnell Reed brings a Mardi Gras pop-up to Time Out Market

Chef Darnell Reed brings a Mardi Gras pop-up to Time Out Market

Named after chef Darnell Reed's great grandmother Luella Funches, Luella's Southern Kitchen has been serving po' boys, gumbo and barbecue shrimp since the restaurant opened in 2015. And while Reed has usually offered a menu of Louisiana-style dishes in the weeks leading up to Mardi Gras, it hasn't been possible to celebrate Fat Tuesday at the Lincoln Park spot for the past few years, because Luella's is usually closed on Tuesdays. You won't be able to dine at Luella's on Fat Tuesday this year (it's closed!), but diners will be able to find some of Reed's favorite dishes inspired by his travels in New Orleans at Time Out Market Chicago. From February 25 through March 1, Luella's Southern Kitchen is taking over a kitchen at Time Out Market Chicago, serving a wide array of Mardi Gras-appropriate fare, including muffuletta, crawfish Ă©touffĂ©e and king cake. “The Muffaletta is definitely my favorite sandwich to eat,” Reed said, talking about his preferred New Orleans dishes. “We're serving it hot or cold, which is something I hadn't seen until I went to Johnny's Po-Boys in New Orleans.” Served on focaccia that Reed and his team bake in-house, Luella's muffuletta is a traditional take on the sandwich that Italian immigrants introduced to New Orleans, stacked with salami, mortadella, deli ham, provolone, mozzarella and muffuletta relish. For those who aren't familiar with New Orleans cuisine, Reed recommends sampling his chicken and sausage gumbo, which draws on a variation of the d