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Upper East Side museums: The best of Museum Mile and its environs

Before hitting Museum Mile’s peerless cultural cache, peruse our list of Upper East Side museums, from the massive Met to private collections.

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Between 82nd and 105th Streets, Fifth Avenue is lined with more than half a dozen celebrated institutions. Trace the history of art in the era- and globe-spanning Metropolitan Museum of Art, then admire the spiral lines of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. It's also essential to head east of Museum Mile for other top Upper East Side museums such as the Whitney Museum of American Art (before it moves to its new Meatpacking District digs).

RECOMMENDED: Upper East Side neighborhood guide

Upper East Side museums

  • Museums
  • Art and design
  • Upper East Side
  • price 3 of 4

UPDATE: Make sure to check for changes in its reopening plan here. While the Guggenheim’s collection of modern art works is certainly impressive, it is impossible to separate the museum’s contents from its form with architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s brilliant and controversial design. Opened in 1959 on Fifth Ave across from Central Park, just months after Wright’s death, the concrete inverted ziggernaut (a Babylonian step pyramid), stomped on the expectations and tradition of clean square galleries exemplified and cherished by the neighboring Upper East Side museums, like the nearby Metropolitan Museum. Instead Wright combined his use of geometric shapes and nature, to create a gallery space that presented art along a flowing, winding spiral, much like a nautilus shell, with little in the way of walls to separate artists, ideas or time periods. Best experienced as Wright intended by taking the elevator to the top of the museum and following the gentle slope down, the art is revealed at different angles along the descent and across the open circular rotunda in a way that even the most well known Monet landscape might seem like a revelation. This unusual, bold way of approaching art, both as it is displayed and viewed, has inspired spectacular exhibits by highly-conceptual contemporary artists such as a series of films by Matthew Barney and hundred of Maurizio Cattelan's sculptures hanging from the ceiling. Considering the steep price of admission ($25, students and seniors $18, c

  • Museums
  • Art and design
  • Lenox Hill
  • price 2 of 4

The opulent residence that houses a private collection of great masters (from the 14th through the 19th centuries) was originally built for industrialist Henry Clay Frick. The firm of Carrère & Hastings designed the 1914 structure in an 18th-century European style, with a beautiful interior court and reflecting pool. The permanent collections include world-class paintings, sculpture and furniture by the likes of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Renoir and French cabinetmaker Jean-Henri Riesener.

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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
  • Things to do
  • Schools and universities
  • Upper East Side
  • price 2 of 4

UPDATE: Cooper Hewitt is temporarily closed. Founded in 1897 by the Hewitt sisters, granddaughters of industrialist Peter Cooper, the only museum in the U.S. solely dedicated to design (both historic and modern) has been part of the Smithsonian since the 1960s. The museum hosts periodic interactive family programs that allow children to experiment with design.

  • Museums
  • Art and design
  • Upper East Side
  • price 2 of 4

UPDATED: The Neue Galerie is closed until further notice. All public programming for the immediate future has been canceled. This elegant addition to the city’s museum scene is devoted entirely to late-19th- and early-20th-century German and Austrian fine and decorative arts. Located in a renovated brick-and-limestone mansion that was built by the architects of the New York Public Library, this brainchild of the late art dealer Serge Sabarsky and cosmetics mogul Ronald S. Lauder has the largest concentration of works by Gustav Klimt (including his iconic Adele Bloch-Bauer I) and Egon Schiele outside Vienna. You’ll also find a bookstore, a chic (and expensive) design shop and the Old World–inspired Café Sabarsky, serving updated Austrian cuisine and ravishing Viennese pastries.

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French Institute Alliance Française
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Museums
  • Special interest
  • Upper East Side
  • price 1 of 4

One of the largest Gallic cultural centers in the country, this language and cultural center has extensive offerings of theater, dance, music and performance throughout the year. Among its impressive facilities is the Haskell Library, stocked with French-language newspapers, magazines, DVDs and books.

Asia Society
  • Museums
  • Special interest
  • Lenox Hill
  • price 1 of 4

The Asia Society sponsors study missions and conferences while promoting public programs in the U.S. and abroad. The headquarters’ striking galleries host major exhibitions of art culled from dozens of countries and time periods—from ancient India and medieval Persia to contemporary Japan—and assembled from public and private collections, including the permanent Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller III collection of Asian art. A spacious, atrium-like café, with a pan-Asian menu, and a beautifully stocked gift shop make the society a one-stop destination for anyone who has an interest in Asian art and culture.

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Society of Illustrators
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Museums
  • Art and design
  • Lenox Hill
  • price 0 of 4

Since it was founded in 1901, the Society of Illustrators has promoted the work of artists around the world through events and exhibitions in the former carriage house of William P. Read, attorney to J. P. Morgan, on the Upper East Side.

Church of St. Vincent Ferrer
  • Museums
  • Special interest
  • Lenox Hill
  • price 0 of 4

An architectural masterpiece, this Franciscan sanctuary on the Upper East Side is a handsome place to catch a concert.

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Americas Society
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Museums
  • Special interest
  • Lenox Hill
  • price 1 of 4

The Americas Society exists to provide public programming and forums to encourage ideas, discussions and debates about issues throughout the Western Hemisphere.

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