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Check out Nick Kroll's ten favorite movies

By
Joshua Rothkopf
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How we miss Kroll Show: the ladies of PubLIZity ("It's based off our names"), Bobby Bottleservice, Pawnsylvania, the "Oh, Hello" guys. These days, Kroll is stretching into drama and comedy, lately in the ambitious indie Adult Beginners—a transition that makes a lot of sense for him, given his broad taste. When it came time for us to research our insanely absorbing list of the 100 best movies of all time, Kroll quickly became a part of the 73 leading actors from around the world we got to contribute ballots. Today, we showcase Kroll's unranked ballot, which is fun, intelligent and diverse. Here are his picks and commentary.

Tootsie "Who doesn't want to see Dustin Hoffman in a dress talking with a Southern accent?"

Being John Malkovich "This movie made me want to write and make movies. It's funny, absurd, heartbreaking and I could watch John Malkovich order towels for three hours."

Samsara "A visually stunning non-narrative experience that spans scenes from all over the world. Best watched super blaaaaazed!"

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown "This was the first Almodovar movie I saw. It's colorful, funny and unfolds at a breakneck pace."

Inside Out "Such a creative and thoughtful manifestation of our emotions and memories with beautiful tools for kids (and adults) to talk about their feelings."

Attack the Block "I don't really like watching scary movies, but this one was so intense and cool. The kids are such badasses and sometimes, it's what you don't see that is scarier than the best makeup or CGI monster."

Blazing Saddles "There are more quotable lines here than just about any movie I've ever watched. The film dealt with race in a way that could barely be approached today. Also, the breaking of the 'fourth wall' was on a level unheard of at that point in filmmaking!"

Love Actually "Not sure exactly why, but if this movie is on TV, I'm watching it."

Catch Me If You Can "Not sure if it's the opening credits, which I love, or the cat-and-mouse game of Tom Hanks and Leonardo DiCaprio, who are both so lonely, but I do love this movie. Young, bright eyed Amy Adams and Jennifer Garner and sweet and sad Christopher Walken don't hurt either."

Spellbound "This documentary follows a bunch of different kids going through the Spelling Bee National Competition. So many great characters and journeys."

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