Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is now a national historic landmark
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The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is now a national historic landmark

 

 

On January 11, the National Park Service announced that NYC’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture was named one of 24 new national historic landmarks, joining Stonewall Inn as another new national landmark in NYC.

 

First opened in 1925, the center in Harlem is considered the the rarest and most useful Afrocentric collection in the United States with over 10 million objects, including archived materials belonging to Malcolm X and Nat King Cole.

 

The National Historic Landmarks Program says it chooses places by recognizing historic properties of “exceptional value to the nation and promotes the preservation efforts of federal, state, and local agencies and Native American tribes.” On top of receiving recognition for their status, they also receive assistance and funding for programs and preservation.

 

Although the art and artifacts division and two main exhibition galleries are currently closed for renovations, the center itself is still open to the public, including the rare books section, and it’s one of the best places to visit this weekend before Martin Luther King Day.

 

—Written by Madeleine Colette Fournier

 

A photo posted by Kia Miller (@nofraudhere) on

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