Destroyer

Music, Rock and indie
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Time Out says

Dan Bejar, a collaborator with The New Pornographers and an idiosyncratic Canadian singer-songwriter who makes music as Destroyer, let loose on his last album, Poison Season, channeling "Born in the USA"–Springsteen via a howling horn section and pounding drums. On his newest album, Ken, however, he turns back towards the sounds of 2011's Kaputt, a dynamic, mature interpretation of ‘80s soft-rock, full of smoky, monochrome synths, cryptic murmurings and muted sax lines.

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