See powerful photos of the 1965 Selma March

Get a glimpse of the stunning civil-rights exhibition at NYC's Stephen Kasher Gallery
By Sophie Harris |
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Whether you've seen Ava DuVernay’s Oscar-winning movie, Selma, or not, the photographs that make up this elegant, significant exhibition are essential viewing. Showing at Stephen Kasher, one of the city's best photography galleries, "Selma March 1965" features work by civil-rights photographers James Barker and Spider Martin, as well as Charles Moore, who took photographs from the point of view of a protest participant. It marks the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, the march on Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., which took place on March 7, 1965.

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Spider Martin

Hosea Williams and John Lewis confront troopers on Bloody Sunday.

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Charles Moore

Sherriff's Deputies prepare to confront marchers.

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Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Charles Moore

State troopers charge demonstrators with their billy clubs.

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Charles Moore

Selma protests

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Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Spider Martin

Dr. King speaking at Brown AME Church after Bloody Sunday

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/James H. Barker

In the basement of Brown Chapel on March 21, 1965

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Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/James H. Barker

Marching on the streets of Montgomery after the rain ceased on March 24, 1965 

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/James H. Barker

Walking through the streets of Montgomery on March 25, 1965

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Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Spider Martin

The march makes its way through Lowndes Country under Armed Guard.

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Spider Martin

Mants, Lewis, Williams and Young with Brown’s Chapel AME Church in the background

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Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Spider Martin

Marching with the United Nation’s flag

Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Spider Martin

A marcher protests segregation across the United States, the flag positioned upside down to signal distress.

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Photograph: Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery/Charles Moore

Joan Baez at the Selma to Montgomery March

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