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David Geffen Hall
Photograph: DBOX

The New York Philharmonic announces first season in gorgeous new theater

Expect 150 concerts to inaugurate the renovated David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center.

Anna Rahmanan
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Anna Rahmanan
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The New York Philharmonic will officially host its 2022-2023 season in its renovated home, David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center.

Following a two-year long renovation effort that cost $550 million, the destination will re-open in October with a slate of 150 concerts that include a month-long festival to celebrate the re-launch plus appearances by great artists and concerts that explore a variety of modern-day issues, including climate change and social injustice.

The orchestra announced its upcoming roster yesterday, which kicks off with Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man."

The season will officially begin on October 7 with "Thank You Concert," a special program for an audience of emergency workers and construction folks responsible for the renovation. 

"It’s a moment for us not only to reunite with people who have come before, but as we look to the future, to develop and nurture new audiences," Deborah Borda, the Philharmonic’s president and chief executive, said to The New York Times. "We can’t just expect people to come. We have to invite them."

A slew of updates delivered within the revamped space is meant to entice people as well, including a 50-foot digital screen in the hall's lobby that will be used to broadcast concerts to the public. There will also be a new studio on premise, overlooking Broadway.

Other outstanding, upcoming acts include the world premiere of "Oyá" by Brazilian composer Marcos Balter; "San Juan Hill," expected to blend music from Trinidad and jazz like other works by Etienne Charles; and the New York premiere of Piano Concert No. 3 by Magnus Lindberg and featuring Yuja Wang.

You can read through the whole schedule right here. A note: as of right now, tickets for the season are only available as part of a New York Philharmonic subscription. Keep an eye out for when they will be released to the general public.

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