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Anna Rahmanan

Anna Rahmanan

Anna Rahmanan is the news editor at Time Out New York and she has been with Time Out since 2016.

Born and raised in Milano, Italy, Anna’s travel bug has taken her all around the world. Read more of her work at https://www.annabenyehuda.com. You can follow her on Twitter at @AnnaRahmanan or on Instagram at @AnnaBYRahmanan.

Articles (38)

The best bike trails in the US

The best bike trails in the US

Pedaling around the city is the best way to get from point A to point B and while most cities in the US are increasing the amount of dedicated bike lanes, we still have a very long way to go. According to Forbes, San Francisco is the country's most cycle-friendly city, followed by Portland, while arguably the best bike trails in the US can be found dotted around California. But... it all depends on what kind of trail you're after: Something pleasant you pedal down while whistling Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head... or a more adrenaline-fueled adventure. Tackle one of the best (and most scenic) bike trails in the US From Wisconsin to Houston and Connecticut to Miami, the United States is packed with easy-to-medium-to-challenging trails, which boast plenty of greenery (and even some national forests) to admire along the way. Plus, these bike routes—from a 20-mile run in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains to a woodsy route in the Cascade Mountains—provide some serious payoff in the form of jaw-dropping views. Looking for more outdoor action? Check out our lists of the very best extreme outdoor adventures in America.    RECOMMENDED: The best hiking trails in the US

The best road trips in the US

The best road trips in the US

Here's the thing: The United States of America is unique in that the country can be explored so easily by car. It's the same size as Australia and it's the same size as Europe. And you'll find as many incredible locations and experiences in the USA as can be found on those other continents. And you'd be amazed at how much one country can change as you explore first one coast, then another and then head north or south on the best road trips in the US.  Road trips can be at the very heart of a holiday: Exploring new territory, taking in as much of the scenery as you can, cranking up the music to match the landscape and even fueling up on gas station snacks, should you be so inclined. Road trips have been immortalized in classic novels, essential movies and legendary songs. If you’re ready to hit the road, here are the best US road trips to take. The great thing about road trips is that they can be enjoyed at any time of year. Maybe you want to load up the car in the summer and build a trip around awesome beaches and stunning national parks, or perhaps you’re more of a winter person looking to hit the road and check out some of the country’s best skiing and snowboarding destinations.  Plan your ultimate automobile getaway by perusing our list of the very best U.S. road trips, which boast incredible views and amazing experiences. These road trips will cover a lot of ground, checking off boxes on your bucket list of adventures. So read on and hit the road like a pro. And as always

Funny things to ask Siri when you're bored

Funny things to ask Siri when you're bored

If an alien landed on a busy street in the middle of the day, it might think most humans have a best friend or personal assistant named Siri. That’s pretty much what she’s become to us iphone people. She can do anything from sending pics of our pets to giving us suggestions for where to get Italian food or where to go for a romantic vacation. If you didn’t know already, Siri can also be a source of entertainment. Ruffle her feathers and get a laugh with these funny things to ask Siri. We’re not sure how anyone figured out these funny things to ask Siri, but they sure do result in some funny answers. She has a sense of humor too. The best part about this quirky Siri feature is that she may give different answers to the same question, so you can ask again and again. Ask her on a date, she may tell you she doesn’t date humans. Or she may tell you she already has plans for the night. Ask her to tell you a joke or a story and she has a vault full. Pry into her personal life and you’ll be surprised by what she responds. You can even shout rude things at her to get a rise out of her, but be sure to apologize afterwards, she won’t hold a grudge.  The cool thing about asking Siri funny questions is that her responses are different almost every time, so she can offer hours of entertainment. Here’s a list of some of the best things to ask Siri: Siri, can you make me laugh?Siri, what’s the meaning of your name?Siri, what’s the best pick-up line?Siri, do you have a boyfriend?Siri, what’s

35 best '90s TV shows and where to stream them now

35 best '90s TV shows and where to stream them now

The ‘90s revival shows no signs of slowing down. Along with a reboot of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, now just titled Bel-Air and described as a more ‘dramatic analogue’ of the hit sitcom, the TV adaptation of ‘90s horror flick I Know What You Did Last Summer, and even HBO Max’s And Just Like That, a continuation of Sex and the City, throwbacks to the 1990s are everywhere. Crop tops, platform sandals, and scrunchies are all the rage, while musicians like Charli XCX, PinkPantheress, Rina Sawayama, and Beabadoobee are all referencing the decade’s sonic sandpit. Such nostalgia makes sense. In a time of tumultuousness, returning to a bygone era can provide comfort among all the instability. It’s why so many of us are returning to rewatch old TV shows from that period. In addition to bringing us back to when life felt just a little bit more simple, sitcoms of the ’90s delve into tackling tough topical topics, all while flaunting feathered bangs and layered crops. It’s just the right amount of calm in an increasingly anxious world, and the best excuse to crawl under a blanket and binge-watch reruns. So after plowing through the best movies on Netflix right now and the platform’s most binge-worthy series, take a walk down memory lane to revisit casts that feel like long-lost friends. Here are the best TV shows of the ‘90s, and where to stream them. You’re welcome!

The 18 best bars in DC for all types of drinkers

The 18 best bars in DC for all types of drinkers

It should come as no surprise that the best bars in DC are as vibrant and diverse as the city itself. The city is overflowing with craft beer drinkers, wine bar lovers, and cocktail joint aficionados alike — from the capital’s diplomatic drinkers to collegiate kids in search of comradery, there’s room for all sorts of establishments and patrons.The fact that DC isn’t technically a state has its perks: locals enjoy certain alcohol-related loopholes that aren't found in other parts of the country. For example, local restaurants and bars can purchase their liquor stock directly from distilleries and breweries, cutting out the wholesale middleman that functions as a distributor in other states (it’s a win for mom-and-pop breweries, to say the least).So raise your old fashioned glass, clink your beer stein, or salute with your favorite vintage as you discover the best bars in DC. RECOMMENDED: the best restaurants in Washington, DC

How to watch the 4th of July fireworks in NYC

How to watch the 4th of July fireworks in NYC

Ladies and gentlemen, we're pleased to announce that, the Macy's 4th of July Fireworks are back! Here are the details: On Monday, July 4, beginning at 9:25pm, over 65,000 shells will be launched off five different barges on the East River. The extravaganza will last 25 minutes and feature, according to Macy's itself, "dozens of colors and shapes, creating dramatic effects a mile across the river and from 1,000 feet in the air to the water's edge." RECOMMENDED: Full coverage of the 4th of July in NYC

Why immersive art experiences will be all over your feed even more in 2022

Why immersive art experiences will be all over your feed even more in 2022

The New Year usually brings new beginnings, but one thing will remain unchanged in 2022: the sheer volume of immersive art experiences that will drench our social media feeds on the daily. Although Vincent van Gogh was the focus of plenty of shows in 2021, immersive art lovers will be treated to a whole host of exhibitions dissecting Frida Kahlo, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso and Gustav Klimt, among others, in the next few months. This comes as no surprise. According to the HERE Institute’s 2020 annual report into the immersive entertainment industry, the sector was valued at more than $61.8 billion (£45.7 billion) at the beginning of 2020 – up 19 percent from 2019’s $49.7 billion (£36.7 billion). One major player in the immersive business, Meow Wolf, the New Mexico-based arts and entertainment company behind immersive shows like Santa Fe’s House of Eternal Return and Las Vegas’s Omega Mart, made a $158 million (£116.8 million) investment earlier this year to expand its footprint across other American cities. MORE 2022 TRENDS:🚆 Why train travel is going to be on your 2022 bucket list🌳 From parklets to urban forests: how cities will get a whole lot greener in 2022🧙 Why 2022 is going to be the biggest ever year for fantasy on screen Clearly people love immersive art – but what makes it different and, perhaps, more attractive than more traditional exhibitions, with sculptures plonked in the middle of rooms and paintings stuck on walls? ‘There is a role for the traditional art

22 things we're looking forward to in 2022

22 things we're looking forward to in 2022

It's hard to believe we've almost come to the end of yet another year. While that's always a time to look back on the year that's passed—from the best new restaurants of 2021 to the Best of the City—it's also a time to look forward to January in NYC and beyond. Below, Time Out New York editors share the things they're most looking forward to in the year ahead from brand-new openings to returning faves.

The best holiday gifts for 2021

The best holiday gifts for 2021

Attention, Santa’s little schleppers! Our cool-as-hell gift ideas for everyone on your “nice” list will make you so excited to shop, you’re going to need a bigger tote (or five) to carry it all. We’ve not only selected the perfect present for the very specific (and picky) New Yorkers in your life, but we managed to do the unthinkable: make holiday shopping fun. So whether you’re searching for a relaxing treatment at one of the city’s best spas for your brother that really, really needs to chill out or a special gift to cheer up your friend with the shittiest commute, we got you. If nothing here appeals to you (impossible), make sure to scope out New York’s excellent holiday markets to find that one-of-a-kind find.

The 18 best subscription boxes that are guaranteed to spark joy

The 18 best subscription boxes that are guaranteed to spark joy

People like packages because people like presents, and that’s why the best subscription boxes are like gifts that keep on giving. Every month or so, today’s subscription services deliver curated boxes straight to your doorstep that are packed with goodies ranging from clothes to coffee, wine, books, makeup, and more. There are offbeat offerings too, like hand-picked vinyl, vintage menswear, gourmet pickles, clothing specifically for women 5’4” and under, and even boxes for your pup. So go ahead and indulge in a monthly gift to yourself — it’s called self-care, and you deserve it. But even if you don’t order one for yourself, these subscriptions are wonderful presents for loved ones, like surprise gifts that spark joy over and over again. Not sure what to pick? Here are just a few of the best subscription boxes that are guaranteed to tick all the boxes.

The best things Time Out New York editors ate in 2021

The best things Time Out New York editors ate in 2021

Even when you spend most of your free time and discretionary income on eating and drinking, some things simply stand out. They may or may not be from the latest openings in town, and we've intentionally left out the best new restaurants that opened in NYC this year so we can spotlight some other great venues. These were some of our favorite things to taste over the last 12 months. These were Time Out New York's editors' favorite food and drinks this year. 

20 travel tips every first-time Rome visitor should follow

20 travel tips every first-time Rome visitor should follow

Rome can be a daunting place. It is okay to admit that, honesty is king after all, and there is something about the Italian capital that can be overwhelming. Maybe it is the weight of history, the mass of people, or maybe simply the chaos of the roads, but travel here isn’t a walk in the park. Of course, you can walk in the parks here, but that isn’t the point. Luckily for the nervous, we’ve put together an expert selection of travel tips for first-time visitors to Rome, covering everything from gelato etiquette to footwear. Yeah, it’s that sort of place, but once you settle in it is almost certainly going to become one of your favourites.

Listings and reviews (23)

For the Birds

For the Birds

"For the Birds" is a new multi-discliplinary exhibit set to take over the Brooklyn Botanic Garden from June 11 through October 23. Visitors will get to gaze at over 30 site-specific birdhouses created by artists, architects and designers and spread throughout the premise.  Among the many striking birdhouses on display is an all-white one by Olalekan Jeyifous, a bug-looking other by Misha Kahn and yet another interesting version created by Warby Parker (the company is a presenting sponsor of the installation). In order to urge folks to reflect on the connection between birds and plants and the urgent need to protect plant ecosystems, the exhibit's creative director, Randall Poster, has also developed a 20-album set of recordings titled "For the Birds: The Birdsong Project." A total of 1174 original pieces of music, more than 70 poems and 20 original album covers will be woven throguhout the installation. You'll notice listening stations and live performances all around.  Check out the exhibition map to find each birdhouse right here. 

Free summer movie series at Governors Island

Free summer movie series at Governors Island

Free outdoor film screenings are back on Governors Island for the summer! The Trust for Governors Island and Film at Lincoln Center are kicking it off with John Cameron Mitchell's Hedwig and the Angry Inch on June 3 followed by an August 5 screening of Sidney Lumet's The Wiz. As usual, you'll get to claim a spot on the Parade Ground, the expansive eight-acre lawn wide-open views of lower Manhattan that defines the island. "Free outdoor screenings in the summer are a treat for New York audiences," said Lesli Klainberg, the president of Film at Lincoln Center, in an official statement. "Film at Lincoln Center looks forward to celebrating iconic films on Governors Island, a spectacular location to gather." Both screenings are free and open to the public with pre-show entertainment kicking off at 7pm and the films beginning at dusk. Food and drinks will be available for purchase, including a beer garden by Threes Brewing along with food from Pizza Yard and additional Governors Island vendors to be announced. 

Italian Literary Fiction Festival

Italian Literary Fiction Festival

If you're a big fan of Elena Ferrante, this is your chance to discover more similar authors as the first-ever Italian Literary Fiction Festival is taking place across three different locations in New York from June 6th through June 8th. The Italian Cultural Institute, the Center for Italian Modern Art (CIMA) and Rizzoli Bookstore will play host to the celebration, which seeks to explore the major trends shaping contemporary Italian fiction. Expect a variety of special events to take center stage across the various venues, including a roundtable discussion about the promotion of Italian fiction in America moderated by, among other folks, Sarah McNally of beloved McNally Jackson fame. Read more about the program and browse through the day-by-day schedule of events right here.

Building the Bronx

Building the Bronx

"Building the Bronx" is a new small exhibit inside the New York Transit Museum's gallery at Grand Central Terminal that explores the history of the Bronx in connection to the transit development. The free installation will stay in place through October. "The Bronx [...] is the only portion of the city not on an island, the only part physically located on the North American continent and the only borough that allows—some say demands—an article in its title," an official description of the exhibit says. "The distinctiveness of the Bronx’s architecture and neighborhoods is a testament to the people who arrived in two waves of urbanization caused by developing transportation: the steam railroads that connected the area to upstate New York, Connecticut and beyond, and the expansion of the subway." Visitors will get to browse through artifacts, films, maps and photographs from the museum's archives during operating hours, which are Wednesdays through Fridays from 11:30am to 6pm. Find the gallery right off the main concourse in the Shuttle Passage, adjacent to the Station Masters' office.

Am Yisrael High: The Story of Jews and Cannabis

Am Yisrael High: The Story of Jews and Cannabis

Most New Yorkers probably don't know that the relationship between Jews and weed is a long and intricated one that spans generations. "Am Yisrael High: The Story of Jews and Cannabis" seeks to explore that history at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research inside the Center for Jewish History (15 West 16th Street). It will be on view May 5 through the end of the year. The show will take a look at the references to the plant that appear in the Bible, and other Jewish texts, while dissecting how cannabis has been used by Jews in religious rituals and for medical purposes throughout the years. On a more contemporary subject, the project will shed light on the Jews that have recently been at the forefront of scientific and medical research surrounding weed, exploring more commercial aspects of the business, including horticulture, distribution and paraphernalia. Expect a variety of medieval documents, more contemporary artifacts and even menorah bongs to be on display throughout the space. "While activity in the many realms of cannabis involves all kinds of people, not only members of the tribe, many Jews have played significant roles in a number of aspects related to cannabis and their connection warrants inquiry," said Eddy Portnoy, the academic advisor and exhibitions curator at YIVO, in an official statement. "The story of Jews and cannabis begins in ancient times and connects to religion, science, medicine and law. It's a story that continues to evolve." The exhibit is comple

Eight Ladles

Eight Ladles

Is there anything more satisfying than a warm soup with some crackers on a cold New York day? That's the kind of feeling that Eight Ladles, a new soup and cracker bar on the Upper West Side, hopes to deliver. Found inside gastropub Thyme & Tonic, the new destination at 474 Columbus Ave offers eight different types of soups alongside a slew of homemade crackers. It's also kosher, vegetarian and vegan friendly. From a classic matzah ball soup to a jamabalaya (cajun spiced tomatoes, peppers, red beans with rice and Impossible meat), a potato and corn chowder (made with vegan baacon and chive topping), a Yemenite lentil soup (turmeric and coriander spiced red lentils with vegetables) and a Moroccan split pea, the soups span all culinary genres and can be ordered in a 12oz bowl or 32oz quart. As for the homemade crackers, which might very well be the most exciting aspect of the new business, diners can order the artisan cheddar, the everything, the zaa'atar, the superseed or the olive oil, oregano and garlic cracker. Yes, they all sound crackling-ly delicious.

Aujla's

Aujla's

Aujla's is a recently relaunched Indian teahouse offering delicious food (Samosas! Daal! Fish sandwiches! Roti!) and drinks from inside of Bode Tailor Shop in the Lower East Side at 56 Hester Street. The menu is delectably simple, highlighting Indian cuisine staples that work both as snacks and meals, but it's the cardamom-infused coffee that is endemic to the South Asian country that mostly excites us. Aaron Aujla, the destination's owner and husband to Emily Bode—the owner of the above-mentioned tailor shop—inherited a coffee maker from Classic Coffee Shop, the previous tenant, which he now uses to make the Indian-style java drinks infused with ground cardamom, served both hot and cold. When asked about the inspiration behind his unique cup of coffee, Aujla references his ancestors, who immigrated from Punjab to Canada in the 1930s. "Part of assimilating to Western culture was using [the ingredients] that were available," he says, explaining that his grandmother would use Folger's instant coffee and infuse it with the spice. "The whole point of it is that it is everyday coffee but it is spiced so it reminded my grandparents of home." At Aujla's, the store owner uses a drip version of Folger's and, although the proper way to serve it would be to first heat it in a pot with milk and sugar, he offers it to patrons as-is. "People add oat milk to it and such," he says.

Anti Valentine's Day party

Anti Valentine's Day party

Lower East Side bar Mr. Purple will be hosting the ultimate anti Valentine's Day party this year, complete with all things black—including flowers, balloons and even a black heart wreath found behind the bar area—on Saturday night, February 12. Folks can bring a photo of their ex, watch the bartender shred it into small pieces and receive a nice cocktail in exchange. (A win-win, if you ask us!) Add to it all the beautiful views you'll get to admire from the 15th floor of Hotel Indigo and you've got yourself a night to remember.

Arcade pop-up

Arcade pop-up

The '90s are back at Showfields, the multi-level shop on Bond Street that bills itself as the "most interesting store in the world." Now through May between Noon and 7pm, patrons get to dive right back into their youth and play an assortment of classic arcade games for free on the store's third floor.  From Pac-Man and Street Fighter II to Mortal Kombat, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and virtual pinball machines, a visit will likely take you down a rabbit hole of nostalgia. There are also games for toddlers and tabletop options. And if you just can't get yourself to part from the arcade, you might want to consider purchasing some of the games for your own apartment—they're all on sale! Take a look at the setup right here: View this post on Instagram A post shared by Vem Pra NY! (@vemprany)

The New Eagle Creek Saloon

The New Eagle Creek Saloon

"The New Eagle Creek Saloon" is a free installation by Sadie Barnette re-imagining the first ever Black-owned gay bar in San Francisco. According to the show's official description, the original bar "offered a safe space for the multiracial queer community who [was] marginalized in other social spaces throughout the city." The installation, which is presented by nonprofit space The Kitchen in collaboration with The Studio Museum in Harlem, is also an ode to the artist's own father, Rodney Barnette, who actually operated the eponymous bar between 1990 and 1993 and was also the founder of the Compton, California chapater of the Black Panther Party. Don't expect an exact reproduction of the bar but, rather, a creative re-imagining of the space—complete with neon-lit signs, a whole lot of pink glitter and photos from the artist's personal archive.  Catch the unique show through March 6.

SVA❤️Milton: The Legacy of Milton Glaser

SVA❤️Milton: The Legacy of Milton Glaser

The School of Visual Arts and the Milton Glaser Design Study Center and Archives are currently hosting an immersive exhibition that looks at the early life and multifaceted career of Milton Glaser, the design giant behind the infamous "I ❤️NY" logo. Aptly titled "SVA❤️Milton: The Legacy of Milton Glaser," the show includes photos, audio artifacts and original works from the Glaser Archives at SVA—all on display across elaborate sets.  There's a record shop featuring over 100 of his famous album covers, a ton of subway posters, his desk (complete with the paraphernalia he used to keep on it) and a book shop with actual tomes and magazine covers in it. The prolific art master, who passed away on his 91st birthday in 2020, was a longtime faculty member and former acting chairman of the college's board. Check out the unique show at the SVA Gramercy Gallery at 209 East 23rd Street Through January 15.

Brrrritney Night with Milk the Queen

Brrrritney Night with Milk the Queen

Here's one only-in-New-York activity you likely never knew you needed: ice skating to Britney Spears music. You'll get to scratch that itch tonight at Brrrritney Night with Milk at Bryant Park's Winter Village. During the one-night-only extravaganza, ice skating drag queen Milk, of RuPaul's Drag Race fame, will be dancing on ice to Spears' top tunes alongside guest performer Cherry Jaymes. After the show, you'll get to migle with Milk.  But that's not all: In addition to the two scheduled performances (one at 7pm and the other at 8:35pm), the night will include skate sessions featuring the pop star's own music. You'll find us sliding to "Stronger," of course. 

News (2007)

Here's the full line-up of Bryant Park's beloved free movie nights

Here's the full line-up of Bryant Park's beloved free movie nights

One of the city's most popular summertime pursuits, free Bryant Park Movie Nights, is officially back for the season—and this year's lineup is looking stellar. Kicking off on June 13, the beloved outdoor screenings will take place every Monday for 10 weeks. The lawn opens at 5pm but the films won't start until 8pm. This year's presentations will focus on the beauty of movie sequels, so do expect a lot of "part twos" in the schedule, which we reproduce below: June 13th: Indiana Jones and the Last CrusadeJune 20th: Creed IIJune 27th: HairsprayJuly 4th: Mission: Impossible — Rogue NationJuly 11th: Wayne’s World 2July 18th: Scream 2July 25th: Beverly Hills Cop IIAugust 1st: Star Trek: First ContactAugust 8th: Grease 2 As is the case every year, you're encouraged to bring your own blanket, but you can also buy one at the park directly. There are no dogs allowed in the area and neither are chairs or tables. It will just be you under the beautiful New York City skyline, watching a great flick and snacking on food you bought from a selection of vendors curated by Hester Street Fair. As mentioned earlier, these are very popular events—so do plan to get there early and expect a lot of people to be there as well. With the announcement of the lineup, we can officially say that summer in New York as begun!

This famous British plant-based burger chain is opening in NYC

This famous British plant-based burger chain is opening in NYC

British folks absolutely love Neat Burger, a plant-based chain that has now landed in the U.S. for the very first time, inside of the Urbanspace food hall on Park Avenue.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Neat Burger (@neat.burger) The chain comes to this side of the Atlantic with stellar references: actor Leonardo DiCaprio and racing champion Lewis Hamilton are both Neat Burger backers. The company has also won PETA's inaugural Company of the Year Award, a designation that is a clear comment on the business' dedication to sustainability.  Although plant-based food seems to be all the rave these days—a new vegan BBQ spot has just opened in midtown and the iconic Eleven Madison Park has gone plant-based, for example—no New York outpost has yet taken over the fast-food market. Neat Burger does just that by offering vegan hot dogs, "chicken" burgers, shakes, French fries and more. The burgers are certainly the menu's centerpiece. Standouts include the filet-no-fish, made with lettuce, tartar sauce and a crispy coated filet; the smoke smash, prepared with a double Neat meat patty smashed with onions, lettuce, jalapenos, pickles, mayo, two crispy onion rings and BBQ sauce; the Neat dog, with grilled onions, pickles, crispy onions, ketchup, mustard and mayo; and the classic Neat burger, served with cheese, grilled onions, pickles, lettuce, tomato, white onions, Neat sauce and stack sauce. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Neat

Eat all the vegan barbecue you want at this new spot in midtown

Eat all the vegan barbecue you want at this new spot in midtown

We thought we reached the peak of all things vegan with the plant-based omakase restaurant that opened in NoMad last month. We were wrong: Pure Grit BBQ is a new destination that just opened at 36 Lexington Avenue at 24th Street that turns what is likely the meatiest cuisine of all into a vegan concept. Photograph: Sara Luckey The new restaurant hopes to deliver barbecue flavors sans the meat, offering New Yorkers plant-based dishes that are also gluten free like the smoked main plate served with half a waffle plus your choice of coleslaw, baked beans, potato salad, charred broccoli salad, fried sweet potato bites or French fries. There's a pulled jackfruit dish that calls for attention in addition to a pulled eggplant sandwich, a fried Daring chicken sandwich, a baked bean burger and more.  The stars of the menu, though, are the cornbread waffles that come with every barbecue plate but can also be ordered as stand-alone sides.  What's more: everything looks like traditional barbecue fare would, likely thanks to the cookshack smoker that's used on-premise. "Our mission is to create a homey dining experience that brings everyone to the table, no matter their dietary philosophy," said Kerry Fitzmaurice, the founder of the outpost, in an official statement. Fitzmaurice enlisted the help of vegan chef Nikki King Bennett (of Netflix's Bad Vegan fame) to come up with the ideal side dishes and pitmaster Daniel Jacobellis to "ensure the authenticity of barbecue in every dish." Pho

The New York Public Library is urging New Yorkers to read these 10 banned books

The New York Public Library is urging New Yorkers to read these 10 banned books

Just a month after announcing its decision to offer free digital library cards to people across the U.S. in response to book bans, the city's three public library systems have launched a new Banned Books Challenge that seeks to stand against the practice of censorship.  Expert librarians from the New York Public Library, the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Public Library have selected ten banned or challenged books they recommend New Yorkers borrow and read.  Here are the highlighted titles: The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Levithan Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen by Jazz Jennings All Boys Aren't Blue by George M. Johnson Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malinda Lo The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison 1984 by George Orwell Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope PÊrez This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki To kick things off, the library has announced that one of the selected books, Malinda Lo's Last Night at the Telegraph Club, will be made available for free via e-reader apps from now through June 26 (when the challenge officially ends). That means you won't even have to wait to get your hands on it.  Some library branches are also going to host book club discussions about the picks, those will likely be targeted at teens since many banned titles are YA novels and the demographic has been mostly impacted by the n

This local bakery officially sells the best baguette in New York

This local bakery officially sells the best baguette in New York

Did you know the Consulate General of France hosts a competition each year to determine who bakes the very best baguette in New York? True story. Following a stiff battle between finalists chosen by readers of media company French Morning and Frenchly, this year's jury—comprised of well-known chefs Alain Allegretti, Jacques Torres and Laurent Tourondel—awarded the best baguette award to our very own Breads Bakery. Congratulations! The winner beat out the likes of Bourke Street Bakery, an Australian transplant that calls midtown Manhattan its New York home; Chocopain, founded by Frenchwoman and former pharma veteran Clémence Danko in 2012; New Jersey-based Liv Breads; and Francois' Bakery, among others.  The competition has been going on for six years all across the U.S. and Canada and past winners include the likes of Maison Kayser. The Breads Bakery baguette, which is actually one of the most popular items at the shop, is sourdough and it's shaped to come to such a sharp point that it effectively toasts during the baking process, giving rise to two crispy little ends to the bread. Needless to say, those are some people's favorite portions of the food.  "Baguettes have a very short life," explains Gadi Peleg, the owner of Breads Bakery. "They are really great when they come out of the oven. After 24 hours, they are hardly edible. To capture this brief moment to ensure our guests can enjoy our baguettes at their prime, Breads Bakery's baguettes are baked in small batches thro

Beloved Angel's Share will re-open at this new location for the time being

Beloved Angel's Share will re-open at this new location for the time being

New Yorkers are still mourning the closure of legendary Japanese-style cocktail bar Angel's Share, which unexpectedly shuttered its Astor Place location back in April. Alas, there's a reason to rejoice: the speakeasy will open a pop-up inside Hotel Eventi at Sixth Avenue and 30th Street starting June 1 through the end of summer. "We are thrilled to partner with Hotel Eventi, our temporary new home for Angel’s Share," said Erina Yoshida, owner of Angel’s Share, in an official statement. "We look forward to welcoming all to our intimate space where we can showcase our craft and hospitality." Expect the same sorts of high-caliber cocktails that have defined the destination since it first opened in 1993, including the ice program that the speakeasy has always been so proud of. The space will actually be retrofitted with specific equipment tailored to the Angel's Share team, a list that features custom freezers as well. As usual, parties larger than four won't be allowed in and entry will be on a first-come, first-served basis. What won't, however, make a comeback is the instantly recognizable mural of cherubs that used to hang above the original bar. According to an official press release, there will, though, be an homage to the iconic painting in place in the form of a high-resolution image of it broken up into several frames to make a collage. "The mural will be highly recognizable from afar and guests will discover details in individual frames up close," reads the press releas

Giant new works of public art have just invaded Brooklyn Bridge Park

Giant new works of public art have just invaded Brooklyn Bridge Park

"Black Atlantic" is a new outdoor public art exhibit that has just taken residence across three piers at Brooklyn Bridge Park and explores the concept of Black identity in the United States of today. Nicholas Knight, Courtesy of Public Art Fund, NY On view through November 27, the show is comprised of five giant sculptures installed throughout the park. "'Black Atlantic' will illustrate a counterpoint to a monolithic perception of Blackness, and is reflective of the multitude of ways in which individuals can create a new vision within the context of American culture that is expansive, malleable and open to all," said artist and co-curator Hugh Hayden in an official statement about the exhibit. Hayden's work, dubbed The Gulf Stream, is a rowboat that looks washed ashore but actually contains a "sculptural carcass." On Elbows, by Dozie Kanu, on the other hand, is a concrete chaise lounge that sits on Texas Wire Wheels and is meant to resemble a slab car. You'll also notice a container filled with dark liquid next to it. Said material "pulsates to the rhythm of a heartbeat, suggesting the processes of the unconscious." Nicholas Knight, Courtesy of Public Art Fund, NY On display is also a piece by Leilah Babirye dubbed Agali Awamu (Togetherness) and consisting of two groups of totemic sculptures made of hollowed three trunks decorated with welded metal and objects that look like jewelry. According to the press release, "these monumental totemic figures come together to repres

You can ride the MTA's beloved Nostalgia Trains this summer

You can ride the MTA's beloved Nostalgia Trains this summer

One of the funnest transit-based activities in New York is back after a COVID-19-fueled, two-year-long hiatus: the Transit Museum's Nostalgia Trains! The museum has been running the beloved rides—which look, feel and sound exactly as they did back in the early 20th century—since 1976. Keep in mind that, in addition to boasting those old-looking straps (a good thing), the trains do not have air conditioning—so it's going to get pretty hot down there (a not-so-good thing). "The vintage cars aren't replicas," said Transit Museum spokesperson Chelsea Newburg to Gothamist. "So, similar to an automobile, keeping our train cars rail-worthy actually requires moving the fleet. So the museum's Nostalgia Rides are a bit of a win-win: it gives the Transit Museum the opportunity to get those vintage train cars moving and out on the rails, and it also gives New Yorkers a chance to take a ride on the same cars that they would have rode more than a century ago." This summer, you'll have a total of three chances to ride the awesome machines. You can find more details about each one below: June 4: Catch the IRT From Old South Ferry Station There will be two rides today, one at 9:30am and the other at 2pm. Each one kicks off from the decommissioned Old South Ferry Loop (it opened back in 1905 and closed to the public in 2017), so here's your chance to glance at that portion of the city as well. The 1916-1925 IRT "Lo-V" car will travel on the 2 line all through Manhattan to the Bronx before turn

Here are all the performances coming to Little Island this summer

Here are all the performances coming to Little Island this summer

The summer season line-up at Little Island is looking awesome.  Back for a second year, the program includes a variety of spectacles, all performed inside The Amph, the public park's theater. Things kick off with The Big Mix, a three-week extravaganza that will run from June 16 through July 3. Each week, guests will experience a unique show that centers around and celebrates one of three summer holidays: Juneteenth, LGBTQIA+ Pride and Independence Day.  Our Second Annual Music and Dance Festival will take over the space from July 20 through July 31. "Each day will feature multiple free performances throughout the park and be anchored by nightly ticketed [shows] in The Amph," reads an official press release about the happening. Other exciting standouts include an innovative spin on contemporary circus (Robot Infidèle), Our Second Annual Storytelling Festival and Island Music Week. You can find the entire schedule of events right here. To note: the staff at Little Island will once again host free weekly performances in The Glad and The Play Ground areas on Wednesdays through Sundays. Each night's shows will focus on a different theme, including kids and family programming, comedy, slam poetry, trivia, drag bingo, cabaret, sing-alongs and more. If you haven't yet visited the relatively new Little Island, make sure you do so immediately. It is a glorious addition to the New York City cultural (and green!) landscape and an architectural gem. 

This new speakeasy is hidden behind a secret door of chocolate bars

This new speakeasy is hidden behind a secret door of chocolate bars

The speakeasy trend that has recently invaded New York continues strong with PS (short for Pacific Standard), a new bar hidden inside just-opened specialty provisions retail shop Pine & Polk at 300 Spring Street by Hudson Street. Photograph: Ashley Sears Curious New Yorkers will find the secret destination behind a shelved wall filled with chocolate bars within Pine & Polk. Inside of PS, patrons will get to order from a roster of 12 signature cocktails and six renamed classics with kitschy names (the traditional "Death in the Afternoon" is here referred to as the "PS." It's a Champagne Cocktail, for example). The food here is also carefully presented, with five different savory grazing boards (read: charcuterie boards) forming the bulk of the menu. The Salt and Sea option is filled with potatoes and roe, grilled shrimp, tinned small scallops, hot sauce, tomato horseradish aioli and saltines, for example. The Nibble and Nosh, on the other hand, features house popcorn, pretzels, horseradish mustard, za'atar spiced nuts, hot honey chickpea mix, pimento cheese and saltines. There are also dessert-focused boards to choose from! The venue, nestled inside the 250-square-foot retail space, fits a total of 39 people at once. Photograph: Ashley Sears What's perhaps most exciting about the dual-concept destination is its effort to showcase women- and minority-owned food businesses all throughout. According to owners Lindsay Weiss and Alyssa Golub, best friends turned business partne

11 interesting works to catch at Frieze Art Fair this weekend

11 interesting works to catch at Frieze Art Fair this weekend

Walking through a pretty massive art fair and trying to point out the most interesting works is an arduous and very personal task. Art, after all, is a subjective craft.  Which is all to say: every single piece at Frieze Art Fair, the festival of contemporary art that this year has taken over The Shed in Hudson Yards through May 22, is worth gazing at. From eclectic sculptures to more traditional paintings and exciting—and pretty massive!—installations, the space is filled with beautiful works from a variety of artists and galleries. Below are some of our (subjectively, personal) favorites: 1. "Fantasia #2" by Anthony Akinbola Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 2. "Drinking Fountains, Mobile, Alabama" by Gordon Parks Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 3. "Don't be mad UPS is hiring: The storm" by Alvaro Barrington Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 4. "Who's Whoggenheim Whoseum?" by Simon Fujiwara Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 5. "It's Me" by Paola Pivi Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 6. "Écorché" by Marsha Pels Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 7. "The Garden of Desolation" by Homa Delvaray Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 8. "Untitled" by Rodney Graham Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 9. "Study for the Assist" by Ernie Barnes Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 10. "Fragmented star (typographical)" by Carlos Amorales Photograph: Anna Rahmanan 11. "Untitled" by Raymond Saunders Photograph: Anna Rahmanan

Beloved Japanese store Daiso is opening its first-ever Manhattan location

Beloved Japanese store Daiso is opening its first-ever Manhattan location

Japanese discount store Daiso already operates locations in Queens and Brooklyn—but it's now time for it to invade Manhattan as well.  The beloved chain is slated to open its 4,800-square-foot space at 220 East 57th Street by Third Avenue this July. The store will officially be the largest one of its kind in town—even bigger than the one that opened in Industry City to much fanfare this past February. (The other New York location opened at the Shops at Skyview Center in Flushing back in 2019.) If you're unfamiliar with the shop, you might want to peruse its cute Instagram account. Shoppers will get to browse through delicious Japanese snacks, items for the home, inexpensive toys, affordable cosmetics, useful baking and arts-and-crafts tools, tableware, stationery, organizing products and more much. You'll basically leave with a ton of stuff that you never thought you needed but can't wait to use around your home. The best part? The prices: most items average out at around $1.99.  Given the fact that Daiso operates 3,620 stores in Japan, plus 2,272 others around the world (including 80 in the United States), you can rest assured that the company knows exactly what it is doing. Word to the wise: Daiso store grand openings are known to be fairly popular occurrences—so be sure to set a lot of time aside if you're planning on visiting on launch day (we'll share details on specific dates when we have them!). Love doing stuff in your city? Tell us all about it in our annual, global