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Neat Burger
Photograph: Courtesy of Neat Burger

This famous British plant-based burger chain is opening in NYC

The Leonardo DiCaprio-approved chain will set up shop inside of Urbanspace for six months.

Anna Rahmanan
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Anna Rahmanan
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British folks absolutely love Neat Burger, a plant-based chain that has now landed in the U.S. for the very first time, inside of the Urbanspace food hall on Park Avenue. 

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The chain comes to this side of the Atlantic with stellar references: actor Leonardo DiCaprio and racing champion Lewis Hamilton are both Neat Burger backers. The company has also won PETA's inaugural Company of the Year Award, a designation that is a clear comment on the business' dedication to sustainability. 

Although plant-based food seems to be all the rave these days—a new vegan BBQ spot has just opened in midtown and the iconic Eleven Madison Park has gone plant-based, for example—no New York outpost has yet taken over the fast-food market. Neat Burger does just that by offering vegan hot dogs, "chicken" burgers, shakes, French fries and more.

The burgers are certainly the menu's centerpiece. Standouts include the filet-no-fish, made with lettuce, tartar sauce and a crispy coated filet; the smoke smash, prepared with a double Neat meat patty smashed with onions, lettuce, jalapenos, pickles, mayo, two crispy onion rings and BBQ sauce; the Neat dog, with grilled onions, pickles, crispy onions, ketchup, mustard and mayo; and the classic Neat burger, served with cheese, grilled onions, pickles, lettuce, tomato, white onions, Neat sauce and stack sauce.

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Bowls, sides, shakes and desserts (cookies! Oreo brownies!) are on offer as well.

The arrival of Neat Burger in the city also portents the debut of a specific sort of vegan cuisine within New York's culinary canon. Up until just a few months ago, eating plant-based food at a restaurant meant giving up on certain flavors and dishes that chefs have until now only been able to create using non-vegan ingredients. Things are clearly changing—and we're here for it.

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