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Unbelievable Airbnbs you'll only find in New York

Unbelievable Airbnbs you'll only find in New York

NYC is the city of dreams—and the hustlers working hard to make those dreams happen. We all need a little extra cash here and there, and the owners of these Airbnbs are making their abodes (or in one case, cars) work for them. Whether you're traveling into New York or staycationing, have Miley Cyrus-levels of cash or barely any, there's something on this list that will peek your curiosity. Here are some, ahem, unique Airbnbs you're likely to find only in New York—some good, some bad, and some ugly—that are (mostly) less than you'll pay for a night at a nice hotel.

New York City Yellow Taxi Cab in Long Island City, $69 per nightSure, we've fallen asleep in cabs loads of times, but usually not on purpose. But now you can stretch out in the back of a yellow taxi cab with a view of the Empire State Building in the distance (through a fence topped with barbed wire). This ol' gal was working the streets, servicing thousands of rushed New Yorkers since 2002, but now she's yours to enjoy with pillows, blankets and a wireless A/C if you so desire. 

Airbnb

 

An apartment in the famed Essex House building with a gorgeous view of Central Park, $1500 per night
Yes, it's that Essex House, the NYC landmark with the big red sign you can see from Central Park. It's got two bedrooms, 2 and a half bathrooms, 180-degree views of the park, and access to all of the JW Marriott's amenities, like concierge, room service and a spa. Is this the kind of place Lindsay Lohan would camp out nowadays?

Airbnb

 

An art collector's apartment in Tribeca, $1000 a nightMost of us are happy to have a nicely framed image from IKEA on our walls, so this incredibly chic apartment would be a trip for any art lover. With all of the paintings, sculptures and modern furniture throughout the house, the incredible view of the river might be the last thing on your mind.

 

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Bunk beds for four (female-only) strangers in Sunnyside, Queens, $35 a night
"Hey honey, we have this open room. Let's stick four strangers in bunk beds in it and see how it goes!" the owners of this Sunnyside abode said to each other. Well, the rest of the house looks nice, and maybe it's better—and cheaper—than a hostel?

 

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A loft in a converted church in Williamsburg, $150 per night
You'll get the whole bottom floor of a two-story loft, plus access to TWO terraces, built into a 19th-century church, with the stained glass windows still intact! The pointed steeples on the outside are just as gorgeous as the interior—there's even exposed brick in the shower!

 

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A "comfy" sofa in the Bronx, $22 per night
Yep, that's all you get. Hey, what's a couch good for if it's not making money for you? It's just sitting there! 

 

 

Airbnb

 

A "budget" room in Williamsburg, $50 per night
Looks like whoever actually lives in this room is the real one with the budget. This is the sort of makeshift bedroom that fits only a bed and absolutely nothing else, increasingly found in trendy Brooklyn neighborhoods. Looks like every piece of furniture is made of plywood. Literally.

Airbnb

 

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Comments

1 comments
Briana P

Interesting and informative piece Jillian.  I do want to point out that of the three homophones peak, peek and pique, the one that would be correct in your first paragraph is 'pique' - meaning to stimulate, as in 'stimulate one's curiosity', rather than 'peek', which is the one you used. 'Peek' means to take a quick look at something, often with the implication of sneaking a look.   Like all good homophones, the three words sound identical but have different meanings and are spelled differently, and they are quite commonly misused.   I'm not trying to be critical here.   I thought that as a professional writer you would want to know this so you will use it correctly in the future.