Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right Little Tong

Little Tong

Restaurants, Chinese East Village
4 out of 5 stars
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
1/7
Photograph: Cayla ZahoranLittle Tong Noodle Shop
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
2/7
Photograph: Cayla ZahoranGrandma chicken mixian at Little Tong Noodle Shop
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
3/7
Photograph: Cayla ZahoranBeef tartare at Little Tong Noodle Shop
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
4/7
Photograph: Cayla ZahoranLittle pot mixian at Little Tong Noodle Shop
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
5/7
Photograph: Cayla ZahoranPork wontons at Little Tong Noodle Shop
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
6/7
Photograph: Cayla Zahoran Little Tong Noodle Shop
 (Photograph: Cayla Zahoran)
7/7
Photograph: Cayla Zahoran Little Tong Noodle Shop

Time Out says

4 out of 5 stars

New York Knows its noodles, from the thinnest ramen to the thickest udon and every soba, somen and cellophane strand in between. But mixian—the Yunnan-born rice noodle that goes down like the love child of Chinese vermicelli and Italian spaghetti—has proven more elusive than its starchy brethren, found predominantly in outer-borough holes-in-the-wall like Yun Nan Flavour Garden in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Wd~50 alum Simone Tong zooms in on the Yunnanese specialty in the city’s densest thicket of noodle houses at Little Tong, her blond-wood, 28-seat East Village canteen with restaurateur Simon Xi (SakaMai, Bar Moga).

Tong is of Szechuan descent but largely trades that region’s peppercorn tingle for Yunnan’s fermented tang: The slight acidity of her soft, springy noodles are best showcased in the little pot mixian ($15), a porky potage laced with pickled mustard seeds and chili vinaigrette, and the grandma chicken mixian ($15), which livens up chicken broth and shredded bird with the sharp funk of pickled daikon radish, black sesame garlic oil and a savory tea egg. In comparison, the Banna shrimp mixian ($15) is curiously subdued, a sweet, chilled bowl of tomato-shellfish broth enriched with coconut milk that displays little of the promised smokiness.

Punchier are the menu’s “Little Eats,” spunky small plates like salted cucumber with a nutty tahini-sesame “bang bang” sauce ($4); a tartare of beef and chopped carrot, served with a slick of Szechuan butter and some pulled roti ($13); and a fresh, fragrant ghost chicken salad, tossed with fermented chilies, pickled red onions and herbs by the fistful ($7). Little Tong may be small in stature, but it’s big where it counts.

By: Christina Izzo

Posted:

Details

Address: 177 First Ave
New York
10003
Cross street: between E 10th and E 11th Sts
Price: Average noodle soup: $15
Contact:
Opening hours: Tue–Sun 5:30–11pm
Do you own this business?

Users say