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Soho Rep

  • Theater
  • Tribeca
  • price 2 of 4
  • Recommended
Uncle Vanya at Soho Rep
Photograph: Julieta CervantesUncle Vanya at Soho Rep
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Time Out Says

A couple of years ago, this Off-Off mainstay moved to an Off Broadway contract, but tickets for most shows are still cheap for Off Broadway. Artistic director Sarah Benson’s programming is diverse and adventurous: recent productions include works by Young Jean Lee, Sarah Kane and the Nature Theater of Oklahoma.

Details

Address:
46 Walker St
New York
Cross street:
between Broadway and Church St
Transport:
Subway: A, C, E, J, Z, N, Q, R, 6 to Canal St; 1 to Franklin St
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What's On

while you were partying

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Comedy

Theater review by Adam Feldman If you have a heart for downtown experimental theater, while you were partying may be the defibrillator you need. Soho Rep’s first production since the shutdown is a short, sharp shock of a play: an unsettling, creepily funny 50-minute exploration of anger, created by writer-director-performers Julia Mounsey and Peter Mills Weiss in collaboration with comedian Brian Fiddyment. Divided into three parts, this ball of fury is sometimes contained and sometimes flares to outrageous size, but all of it burns.  Mounsey begins the play by playing a recording of herself telling a story while she sits mutely in a chair onstage, watching us as we watch her. Her story, which she calls “The Angriest I’ve Ever Been,” involves visiting a friend from high school named Brian while he recovers from a failed suicide attempt; she loses her temper and says hurtful things, which she feels guilty about. This anecdote serves as an introduction to the staged-reading-within-a-play that follows—the work-in-progress draft, she says, of a comedy she has written by way of apology to Brian. But there’s nothing conciliatory about it: It’s a savage portrait of a pathetic man-baby monster named Brian who exists in a perpetual state of tantrum. (“I want to be a Weapon of Healing,” Mounsey explains later. “But that’s not what weapons do.”)    This version of Brian is a relentless tornado of entitlement, panic and desperation, and Fiddyment plays him with a sustained intensity that

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