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James Manning

James Manning

Travel Editor

James Manning is Time Out’s travel editor. He’s been a full-time Time Outer since 2013.

He writes about fun, food and all things cool and weird in cities around the world. Born and bred in London, he’s been writing about the city and its culture since his mid-teens and is also a voracious traveller. He plays bass guitar badly and is an absolute fiend for tapas.

Follow him on Twitter: @jamestcmanning

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Articles (166)

The 23 best things to do in the world in 2023

The 23 best things to do in the world in 2023

Almost three years since the you-know-what put all our plans on hold, it’s set to be a pretty big year for getting out and doing things. 2023 has come through with an absolutely loaded cultural calendar – we’re talking the biggest summer for live music since 2019, a bunch of new museums, some pretty epic outdoor adventures, and much, much more. Plus, with all the new high-speed and overnight trains launching this year, you can get around and do the things you want to do much more sustainably than ever before.  So get your booking fingers at the ready. From music festivals and new museums to massive shops and the real-life Mushroom Kingdom, this is your definitive guide to the coolest new things to do in the world in 2023. RECOMMENDED:  🖼️ The best museums and galleries in the world🚂 The most incredible train journeys around the world🌊 The cities that could be underwater by 2030🌹 The most romantic places in the world 🍸 The coolest bars in the world right now🤿 The best beaches in the world

The 12 best places to visit in France

The 12 best places to visit in France

France is one of the most visited places on the planet – and you better believe that it lives up to every bit of the hype. This famous country has been at the cultural heart of western Europe for millennia, and you can see signs of its complex and fascinating past all over the place. But it’s not all grand old châteaux: France is also blessed with some exceptionally beautiful natural wonders and some of Europe’s coolest city-break destinations. So, from heavenly beach destinations and picturesque rural villages to grand old cities like Paris, Lyon and Marseille, these are the best places to visit in France – and some of the world’s most essential destinations. Discover France: 📍 The best things to do in France🌳 The prettiest villages in France🏖 The best beaches in France🏰 Spectacular French châteaux you can rent😋 The best restaurants in France

Les 20 meilleures villes au monde en 2019

Les 20 meilleures villes au monde en 2019

Quelle est la meilleure ville du monde ? S’il y a autant de villes que de réponses possibles – bon on abuse un peu, personne de sérieux ne voterait pour Sochaux – on s’est lancé le défi, chez Time Out, d’établir un classement. THE classement. Quel ne fut pas notre casse-tête ! Casse-tête car on est parti d’un constat simple : chaque citadin aspire à un mood différent. Il y a ceux (les gros gourmands) qui vont privilégier l’offre culinaire pour se faire un avis sur une ville. D’autres qui miseront sur les activités nocturnes et les bars (on ne se refait pas). Quand d’autres, enfin, favoriseront des critères variés comme le pouvoir d’achat, la qualité des transports publics ou l’hospitalité des voisins (on est mal barré à ce niveau-là sur Paris). Bref, on peut continuer la liste pendant longtemps mais vous manquez d’aspirine, et nous de café. La bonne nouvelle c’est que chez Time Out, on a trouvé la solution la plus simple pour établir un ordre digne de ce nom : en vous interrogeant directement vous, citoyens du monde. En partenariat avec Tapestry Research, nous avons interrogé près de 34 000 personnes anonymes - de Melbourne à Madrid, en passant par Chicago, le Cap, Tel Aviv et Tokyo – sur la gastronomie, les bars, la culture, la vie nocturne, le bonheur, la beauté de leur ville... Ensuite, nous avons posé la même série de questions à tous les rédacteurs en chef Time Out : des experts qui connaissent leur ville comme personne d'autre. Enfin, nous avons croisé les chiffres pour

The 18 best things to do in Florence

The 18 best things to do in Florence

It’s true what they say: Florence really is the city of lurrve. And not just because it’s got a whole host of romantic things to do with your partner (or bestie), but because you’re guaranteed to fall in love with the city itself. Florence is one of those Italian cities that has it all, and it’s pretty big too, so you’re going to need a plan in place to get it all in.  Firstly, it’s well known that Florence is home to some of the best art going, from Renaissance pieces at the Uffizi to Michelangelo’s marble. But peppered between its most well-known sights are quaint cafés, food markets and brilliant restaurants for pasta and more. Plus old ancient buildings to get lost in, best enjoyed with a slice of pizza in hand. Ready for your love affair to begin? Here’s 18 things to do in Florence that you just can’t miss.  RECOMMENDED:🛍 A complete guide to shopping in Florence🍦 Here's where to eat the best gelato in Florence🏡 The best Airbnbs in Florence🏨 The best hotels in Florence

10 of Spain’s most underrated destinations to visit this year

10 of Spain’s most underrated destinations to visit this year

Spain is never a bad idea. With its incredible food, landscapes of almost surreal beauty and many of Europe’s best beaches, it’s a guaranteed winner – hence the 84 million tourists who visited in 2019. But sun, sea and sangria are just the start. If you want to dive deeper into the culture of Spain (which, trust us, you do), you need to get off the beach and follow the locals to the Spanish holiday destinations you won’t have seen on Instagram. Of course, we love Spain’s thriving cities and sunsplashed Costas. But here, our Time Out editors in Madrid and Barcelona have picked ten Spanish holiday ideas that’ll help you escape the crowds and explore a side of Spain that only locals see. On the itinerary: history, hiking, art and nightlife – from mountainous landscapes to medieval spa towns, and from the shores of Asturias to the lakes of Extremadura – plus plenty of wine and tapas. (We’re not skipping any of the good stuff.) So forget Torremolinos, Magaluf and Lanzarote. Read on for the holidays in Spain you never knew existed, and start planning your next adventure.

The world’s most spectacular ocean pools

The world’s most spectacular ocean pools

When it comes to taking a dip, swimming in the open sea is as good as it gets. With no chlorine, no sweaty changing rooms, and a natural conveyor belt of incredible views, the world’s most spectacular ocean pools represent the very pinnacle when it comes to swimming, and these are the best of the best. From the Pacific coast of Mexico to the Atlantic islands of Madeira and Tenerife, these ocean pools offer safe water and gorgeous vistas ready for a good time. Water a little cold? Don’t worry, actual scientists have proven that chilly swims are good for your health. Without further ado, let's get dipping. RECOMMENDED: 🏖 The best beaches in the world🤐 The best secret beaches in the U.S.

Digital nomad visas: the countries where you can live and work remotely

Digital nomad visas: the countries where you can live and work remotely

Of all the many things that the last few years have upended, office life is one of the biggest. Tools like email and video chat apps have (at least in theory) untethered many of us from the workplace, meaning there may be very little need for many restless workers to stay rooted in one place. And that makes moving somewhere sunnier, cheaper or just more fun sound incredibly tempting. As nations around the world have reopened their borders to travellers, many popular destinations have emphasised longer-term stays over short-term breaks. And at the very extreme end, some are even trying to sell themselves as idyllic remote-working spots, with new ‘digital nomad’ visas that would allow you to live and work there for up to a year – or sometimes even longer. Here’s a guide to the countries offering digital nomad visas right now, and how you can qualify. And here’s what it’s actually like to be a digital nomad – and how to become one yourself.

Sri Lankan fruits you need to try

Sri Lankan fruits you need to try

You’ve probably eaten a few mangoes and pineapples before. If you’ve been to one of the fancier worldwide supermarkets you might have even found a star-fruit. These are staple Sri Lankan exports, but the country has a whole host of fruits that are still relatively unknown. Some of these fruits grow in unlikely places, others are inedible without the right know-how; most of them are pretty special. RECOMMENDED: 📍 The best things to do in Sri Lanka

The 65 best Christmas songs of all time

The 65 best Christmas songs of all time

Love them, hate them, or just accept them as a sort of immutable fact of life, Christmas songs are a thing, and as December 25 gets inexorably closer and closer they’re a thing that becomes increasingly inescapable. And although there’s been a fair amount of disposable novelty rubbish written over the years, the reality is that a lot of Christmas songs are bangers. There are plenty of keepers from the ‘40s-‘70s heyday of the Christmas record as an art form. But even more cynical later generations of pop have produced plenty of gold. There is, of course, something of a Christmas canon: ‘All I Want for Christmas is You’ and ‘Fairytale of New York’ are great songs… which is good, as inevitably you’re going to hear them about a million times this holidays. But festive cheer has found its way into pop, hip-hop, R&B, metal, punk, indie… you name it. And as a gift for you, we’ve assembled 65 Christmas songs so incredibly catchy, you just might want to listen all year round. Good luck finding the nog in August though. RECOMMENDED: 🎁  The best Christmas markets to visit in Europe and worldwide🎅  The best places to go for Christmas🎄  The six best Christmas towns to visit around the world🎉  The best party songs🎤  The best karaoke songs🕺  The best pop songs of all time🎸  The best classic rock songs😊  The best happy songs

The 51 coolest neighbourhoods in the world

The 51 coolest neighbourhoods in the world

It’s been a rough few years for the world at large – but in many ways, a fantastic one for neighbourhoods. Although we haven’t been able to travel the world as freely as we once did, billions of us have been spending more time than ever closer to home. And in many of the world’s greatest cities, the result has been a full-blown neighbourhood renaissance. It’s true that much-loved local shops, restaurants, bars and creative spaces have, sadly, shuttered for good. But there’s also been a whole wave of new businesses opening, driven not just by increased footfall outside city centres, but also by the ‘great resignation’. City-dwellers have quit their corporate jobs to finally follow their joy, whether it’s opening that corner café or much-needed local LGBTQ+ bar, or just spending more time living slowly and spending more time (and money) in their local area. At the same time, local officials the world over have been re-establishing their neighbourhoods as places for people. In some cases that’s meant overhauling street space: less driving, more walking, cycling and hanging out. In others, it’s meant tackling problems like overtourism, inequality and air pollution. All of this has led to districts looking very different than they did just a few years ago – and becoming better places for locals and travellers alike. RECOMMENDED: The 33 coolest streets in the world Every year, we canvas thousands of city-dwellers around the world in our Time Out Index survey. As always, this year

The best restaurants in Italy

The best restaurants in Italy

We know the idea of “best restaurants” is relative, and controversial. It’s nearly impossible to settle on the best restaurants in a single city, let alone the best restaurants in an entire country! But we’re up for a challenge, and after eating our way through Italy, we have some favorites that we promise you are very, very good. Located up and down the boot, these eateries serve exceptionally well-executed regional cuisine in beautiful, unique settings. From mountain lodges and seaside bistros to fine-dining and casual trattorias, here are the 20 best restaurants in Italy.

The 33 coolest streets in the world

The 33 coolest streets in the world

Street life: it’s the only life we know. Seriously, streets are where most of us spend our lives – hanging out, eating, drinking, working, sleeping and occasionally pulling some embarrassing dance moves. If parks are the lungs of the city, streets are its veins, carrying urbanites around each day like stressed-but-happy little blood cells. Street life is what makes the places we live feel alive. Which makes streets kind of a big deal. Why are we telling you this? Because every year, we quiz thousands of city-dwellers around the world for our Time Out Index survey. And this year, we asked more than 20,000 people the question: what’s the coolest street in your city? We wanted to know about the places that locals love – the very coolest bits of the coolest neighbourhoods in the world. Once we had our shortlist of the vibiest streets in each city we surveyed, we took it to the experts. Our local Time Out editors and contributors, people who know the city like no one else, narrowed down the selection. Behold the results: our 2022 ranking of the coolest streets on the planet right now. Since our inaugural street hotlist last year, the world has crept further back towards normality. Many places still face ongoing health restrictions as well as rising living costs. But at this moment, more people are getting out and about in their hometowns – and travelling to visit the world’s greatest cities – than at any time since the start of 2020. So consider this ranking a really, really speci

Listings and reviews (49)

Vinegar Yard

Vinegar Yard

Lovers of good eating and good times, here’s yet another good reason to go south of the river. A new hangout has popped up around the back of London Bridge station. Sitting exactly halfway between Borough Market and Maltby Street Market, this former car park is due to be totally redeveloped over the coming years. But for now it has been taken over by Benj Scrimgeour, founder of nearby Flat Iron Square and long-lost nightclub The Arches. Vinegar Yard is an urban garden open seven days a week, with food stalls (including Indian-inspired burgers from Baba G’s), vintage clothing and antiques traders, and a bar pulling local beers. There’s even a bonkers installation by artist-in-residence Joe Rush, famous for his scrap-metal sculptures at Glasto. Ignore the name: this place won’t leave a sour taste.

‘Dracula’ review

‘Dracula’ review

3 out of 5 stars

Horror’s coming home, it’s coming home, it’s coming – back to the very library where Bram Stoker researched ‘Dracula’ between 1890 and 1897. Oxford company Creation Theatre has pulled off two impressive feats here: firstly by persuading the members-only London Library to host a production in its historic Reading Room (where Stoker almost certainly boned up on Eastern Europe and the occult) and secondly by devising a version of the vampire story in which no one plays the title role. In fact, Creation’s site-specific ‘Dracula’ features just two actors, Sophie Greenham and Bart Lambert, playing Mina and Jonathan Harker in a sexually repressed post-war setting. Solicitor Jonathan hasn’t been the same since his business trip to Romania, and a stay in Whitby to sort through the possessions of Mina’s late friend Lucy Westenra isn’t helping – especially when the weather turns, claustrophobia sets in and Jonathan’s Transylvanian flashbacks start to get very real. Projected visuals help collapse huge chunks of backstory into effective, supernatural fever dreams, and there are even a few laughs in some original scenes by writer/adapter Kate Kerrow, as the recently hitched Harkers fail to seal the deal on the chaise longue in Lucy’s library. The weaker bits of Creation’s production are when the plot strays from the Jonathan-and-Mina psychodrama, with Greenham and Lambert donning some iffy accessories and voices to play other characters from the novel. (As dodgy ‘Dracula’ accents go, Lam

A Home Away from Home: The India Club

A Home Away from Home: The India Club

The India Club is one of the city’s most fascinating post-colonial relics: a bar, lounge and Indian restaurant (one of the UK’s oldest) that’s hardly changed in 65 years. Last summer it was saved from redevelopment, and this week the National Trust opens an on-site exhibition which explores its history and celebrates the survival of a London institution. Opened on this site in 1964 by the India League, which had campaigned for the former British colony’s independence, the India Club became a first port of call for new arrivals from the subcontinent and a hub for the capital’s burgeoning Asian community. ‘A Home Away from Home: The India Club’ is an immersive oral history consisting of interviews with club regulars over the decades plus archive photos and documents. You can book in for a series of themed supperclubs and cooking classes too – because history is always better with snacks.

Circle Collective

Circle Collective

Here’s a sobering fact for you: young people from a BAME background are less likely to have a job than any other Briton. Being unemployed between 18 and 25 can have a major impact on later life chances, and the biggest barrier to work is lack of experience. So a big hand for Circle Collective: a social enterprise that helps young Londoners get jobs – and runs a very cool streetwear shop in Dalston (there’s another branch in Lewisham). Since 2012, the charity has helped more than 350 disadvantaged young people into work by providing them with CV advice, mentoring, training and, crucially, experience working in retail. For nearly half of Circle Collective participants, it’s their first time in the workplace. Want to help? Just pop along to one of Circle Collective’s outlets next time you need to buy someone a present (there’s an online shop too). They stock independent designers alongside the big labels, all profits are reinvested in the charity, and you’ll be helping young locals perfect their sales technique.

OnBlackheath

OnBlackheath

There’s plenty of history on Blackheath – former hotspot for highway men and an urban oasis – but it wasn’t until 2014 that this expanse of common ground in south-east London hosted its first proper music festival. OnBlackheath returns this September for a fifth year, once again bringing together the worlds of music and food for some end-of-the-season festival action. On the music front, there'll be the likes of Squeeze, Paloma Faith, Billy Bragg, Corinne Bailey Rae, De La Soul, Lightening Seeds and London Afrobeat Orchestra (performing Talking Heads) on the line up.  Beyond the live acts, they'll be a food village where you can see pro cooks in action, and there'll be family fun of all varieties to get involved in. Find out more here.

Bohemia Place

Bohemia Place

Thought you knew every nook and cranny of Hackney? Here’s a bit you’ve probably never even heard of. Tucked between a railway line and a bus depot opposite Hackney Central Overground, Bohemia Place was once a tram shed. Until last year, you would only have gone down there to get your car fixed. But now, like other arch-lined streets across the city, Bohemia Place is getting a makeover. Pressure Drop (based here since 2012) has shacked up with Verdant Brewing Company to turn its former brewery into a joint taproom. Another brewery tap, St John at Hackney, has just opened its doors, as has a new cocktails-and-food spot from party stalwarts Night Tales. Zero-waste grocery shop Bulk Market and madcap cocktail crew ABQ are moving in this summer too, and in the long term, there are grand plans for a ‘creative maker yard’. Hackneyed? Not yet it isn’t.

TT Liquor

TT Liquor

4 out of 5 stars

Ever got drunk in the Tardis? From the Kingsland Road pavement, this bar on the Shoreditch/Hoxton border doesn’t look like much more than a cute little bottle shop. But wander on in and you’ll discover there’s a whole world of bevvying to be had inside this converted police station. Past the front-room ‘liquor store’, stacked high with beers, wines, spirits and mixological gear, you’ll find a wood-panelled drinking parlour. And in a further space upstairs, TT also hosts supper clubs and pairs cocktails with cult movie screenings: think ‘The Big Lebowski’ with white russians. And then there’s the main event: a speakeasy-style bar tucked away in the cellar, its brick walls lined with caged bottles and the obligatory old-school filament bulbs. This is the former cop-shop lock-up, now a drunk tank of a much more upscale variety. The cocktail menu references different eras of barmanship with a lean towards gin, though the staff are more than happy to go off-road. Adding jasmine tea and soda, the Groglet spun out the classic gimlet into something longer and more laid back, while the Rosetta came over like a short and floral margarita. Service is affable and unshowy, drinks are gimmick-free and the crowd is refreshingly short on the kind of wankers you might expect to find in a basement bar on the Kingsland Road. If you’re acquainted with the two bars that TT’s founders also helped set up, Discount Suit Company or the Sun Tavern, you’ll recognise the stripped-back vibe – but this se

Newcomer Wines Dalston

Newcomer Wines Dalston

3 out of 5 stars

Austrian wine: it’s a thing. Although it’s no titan of viniculture, Austria still produces plenty of the stuff – 470 times more than the UK each year, in fact. The 1985 ‘antifreeze scandal’ didn’t do the country’s vinous reputation any favours, but Austrian winemakers have staged a comeback by concentrating on quality over quantity, and an aptly named new arrival on Dalston Lane aims to showcase their very best. By day a bottle shop, by night a fairly chichi wine bar, Newcomer claims (and we’ve no reason to doubt it) to stock the biggest selection of Austrian wine and beer in London. The bar at the front pours a daily selection (£6.50 for a small glass), and the walls are lined with an absolutely enormous selection of bottles, all available to drink on or off the premises. Bottles tend to hover between £40 and £50, with only a couple below the £20 mark. With prices like that, it’s clear that Newcomer isn’t exactly pitching itself at the wider population of Hackney. But Dalston hasn’t (yet) turned into Islington: it’s a long way from wine bar saturation point, and Newcomer definitely has a niche as a cute love letter to its co-founders’ homeland. I’ll confess that I’m not big on the dry white wines that are Austria’s speciality, but my Jurtschitsch pinot noir was a minor revelation, with a light mineral come-on that segued into unexpected depths. If you don’t care what accent your wine speaks with, it’s a little hard to be bothered about Newcomer’s alleinstellungsmerkmal (that

Dracula review

Dracula review

4 out of 5 stars

'No red liquids inside the house,' says the sign on the bar at this site-specific promenade play – which you'd think would be a bit of a problem for any company looking to stage the vampire story, but makes sense when you remember the venue is a wood-panelled Tudor manor house meticulously looked after by the National Trust. Despite sitting on the traffic-choked A102, Sutton House is pretty much the most atmospheric venue in Hackney, and it turns Tea Break Theatre's 'Dracula' from an entertaining evening to something that's often genuinely chilling. Whether via Bram Stoker or Francis Ford Coppola, you're probably familiar with the basics of the 'Dracula' story, but Tea Break's time-travelling, site-specific twist (complete with what might be a reference to season five of 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer') should ensure that even dedicated gothic-lit fans won't see the ending coming. Showers of insects, sudden blackouts and things going bump in the night notwithstanding, there isn't much to trouble the seriously immersive theatre-phobic: most of the audience gets to stay behind the fourth wall, although my SO did get a one-on-one psychiatric appointment with Dr Seward. The racier undercurrents of Stoker's original manifest themselves as gender switches and a bit of supernatural homoerotic hanky-panky, and lapses into blank verse, local history and Latin suggest that writer-director Katharine Armitage has done quite a bit of homework. The conclusion is a tad confusing, and an unnecess

Treves & Hyde

Treves & Hyde

3 out of 5 stars

It’s all go in Aldgate, where new towers are springing up like expensive mushrooms and boring old office blocks are transmogrifying into co-working spaces and photography galleries. This place is at the sharp end of London’s contradictions: swanky flats versus strip clubs, chicken shops versus shiny wine bars, builders’ caffs versus aspirational/casual restaurant/bar/cafés like Treves & Hyde. It’s a bit of a fine-dining blackspot round here, and in that respect this modern European kitchen is a welcome arrival. But like the neighbourhood itself, T&H is suffering a bit of an identity crisis. Downstairs it’s a coffee shop; upstairs a restaurant and cocktail bar. And it’s full of weird dichotomies. The flashy presentation (stacks and streaks everywhere) belies the solid, reliable flavours: a small-but-mighty wodge of pork belly, a salty, buttery, fresh prawn pasta. The house red was from super-classy vintners Berry Bros & Rudd, but the coconut panna cotta came pre-refrigerated in a jar. Confused? I was. The restaurant is too relaxed and reasonably priced for a fancy treat, but too upmarket to become a bargainous neighbourhood stalwart. Though there’s plenty that’s impressive here (even delicious), the lasting feeling is confusion: not so much Treves & Hyde as Jekyll & Hyde.

The Whitechapel Refectory

The Whitechapel Refectory

Please note, The Whitechapel Refectory is now closed. It has been replaced by a new restaurant, called Townsend, on the same site. Time Out Food editors, March 2020. As part of the changing of the culinary guard at the Whitechapel Gallery, the old café has been taken over by Luke Wilson and Cameron Emirali, founders of 8 Hoxton Square and 10 Greek Street. Not only that, but they’ve gone for the double and split the existing business in two: in the evenings, the wood-panelled café space is a pretty great wine and charcuterie joint called After Hours. During the day it’s a gallery café called The Whitechapel Refectory. Though the civilised gallery café atmosphere hasn’t changed much under the new regime, the daytime rebrand isn’t cosmetic. There’s a new approach to the food, too, with a varied menu that changes daily. The kitchen was closed when I dropped in at around 4pm, meaning no hot food for late lunchers. But the cold selection was lovely: a big wholemeal salt beef sandwich (nodding to nearby Brick Lane); a strong aubergine salad with sweet potato, roasted garlic and unexpected cumin and fennel; and, to finish, a delicious prune and almond frangipane. Granola bars, breakfast pastries and other good-looking baked bits are also available, and the coffee’s lovely. There’s nothing really cutting-edge about the Refectory – it’s more William Morris than Eduardo Paolozzi. But for hungry art lovers it’s a nifty new pit-stop.

After Hours

After Hours

4 out of 5 stars

The old café at the Whitechapel Gallery was a good place for a coffee, but it didn’t have the buzz to match the world-class art. At the end of last year it was taken over by the people who run 10 Greek Street and 8 Hoxton Square and reincarnated as two separate enterprises sharing the same space: a new café called The Whitechapel Refectory and a wine bar named After Hours. Both of the new spots are winners, but it’s After Hours that makes this place worth dropping by even if there’s no art on the agenda. Open till 11pm on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings only, it takes up the same wood-panelled space as the old café did, sprawled across the foyer. The wine list, arranged from light to heavy, is wide-ranging and decently-priced – our bottle of red was a delightfully sweet Italian primitivo at £24. There’s a rotating cheese and charcuterie selection for sophisticated stomach-lining: fiery ’nduja, a nicely savoury yarg and a heavenly serrano were the real masterpieces on display. As for the vibe, it’s chic but relaxed with pleasantly unstarchy, clued-up service. There are special events – DJ sets, wine tastings and so forth – on two Saturdays each month. There are also lots of dates to eavesdrop on and the location draws a predictably arty crowd. But you’ll find a warm welcome here even if you thought the Turner Prize was named after Anthea.

News (668)

タイムアウトマーケットがバルセロナに出店

タイムアウトマーケットがバルセロナに出店

ポルトガルの首都の「ベスト」を提供するタイムアウトマーケットの1号店がリスボンに登場したのは、2014年。その後マイアミ、ニューヨーク、ボストン、モントリオール、シカゴ、ドバイに次々とオープンしているが、また大きな(そして、おいしい)ニュースを伝えることができる。 タイムアウトマーケットが、バルセロナに出店することが決定したのだ。オープンは2024年前半の予定となっている。 タイムアウトマーケットは、地元の編集者や専門家がその街における最高の食事や文化をキュレーションし、それらを全て一つの活気あるスペースに集結させたフードマーケット。もちろんバルセロナでも、このシンプルなコンセプトが体験できる。 タイムアウトマーケットバルセロナが入るのは、複合商業施設「Maremagnum」の最上階。同施設はバルセロナのウォーターフロントであるポートベルの水上に位置し、街のメインストリートであるラ・ランブラ通りとは水上橋で結ばれている。 マーケット内には14のキッチン(と共同テーブル)とフルサービスのレストランが設けられ、タイムアウトバルセロナチームが厳選した街で最高の料理が提供される。2008年以来、毎週取材を続け、ほかの誰よりもバルセロナを知り尽くしている、彼らならではのキュレーションに期待してほしい。 屋内には2つ、屋外もさらに2つのバーが造られる。言うまでもなく、バルセロナの壮大な景色を見渡せる素晴らしい眺望も魅力だ。午後にベルモットを飲むのに、ちょうどいい場所となるだろう。さらに、バルセロナのカルチャーシーンを定期的に紹介する、イベントスペースとスタジオも見逃せない。 2024年前半、バルセロナへの旅を計画してみてはどうだろうか。 タイムアウトマーケットは、すでに大阪をはじめ、ポルト、ケープタウン、プラハ、バンクーバー、アブダビ、リヤドへの出店が決定している。 関連記事 『Time Out Market is coming to Barcelona(原文)』 『アジア初進出、世界で話題のタイムアウトマーケットが大阪に上陸』 『「大阪で食べるべきものリスト」がアツい、タイムアウトマーケットのCEO来日』 『タイムアウトマーケットは「ひとつ屋根の下で街のベストが集まる場所」』 『タイムアウトマーケットについて知るべき5のこと』 『タイムアウトマーケット、南ア・ケープタウンに2023年末オープン』 東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら  

Time Out Market is coming to Barcelona

Time Out Market is coming to Barcelona

First came Time Out Market Lisbon, serving up the best of the Portuguese capital since 2014. Then came Miami, New York, Boston, Montreal, Chicago and Dubai. Now we’ve got some big (and delicious) news: Time Out Market is coming to… Barcelona! The Time Out Market concept is simple. Our local editors and experts pick the greatest eats, drinks and cultural goings-on that the city has to offer. Then we bring them all together in one vibey space. In Barcelona, that space will be in Maremagnum: the shopping and fun complex that sits out in the waters of the city’s Port Vell, linked to La Rambla by a floating bridge. Time Out Market Barcelona will take up residence on the top floor of Maremagnum, with 14 kitchens (plus communal tables to eat at) and a full-on restaurant – all slinging the city’s best dishes, and all hand-picked by our local Time Out Barcelona team. They’ve been covering the city week in, week out since 2008, so they know the city like nobody else. Photograph: ShutterstockTime Out Market Lisbon There will also be two bars indoors, and an outdoor space with two more bars. (Plus, it should go without saying, amazing views over the spectacular Barcelona skyline.) Just the place for an afternoon vermut. And it’s not all about eating and drinking: an events space and studio will bring the best of Barcelona’s culture scene through the doors on a regular basis. So when can you plan your visit? Sooner than you think: Time Out Market Barcelona is expected to open in the fir

Spain is launching a digital nomad visa for remote workers

Spain is launching a digital nomad visa for remote workers

Fancy packing up your laptop, filling a few suitcases and heading over to sunny Spain to do exactly the same job you’re doing now, but in a far nicer setting? Well, if you’ve got the kind of job where you can actually do that, you’re in luck. The Spanish government has just announced plans for a ‘digital nomad’ visa which would let foreign remote workers live and work in the country for up to a year. Spain’s new scheme is specifically targeted at freelancers, people who are fully employed but work remotely, and those who make at least 80 percent of their income from companies outside of Spain. Perhaps the best part of the new visa scheme is that it applies to the entirety of Spain. Which means that while some people might be tempted to move to bustling, cultural-packed metropolises like Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia or Bilbao, you could also head to beachy Ibiza or even the all-round sun trap that is the Canary Islands. Spain is also generally a cheaper place to live than many other western European countries, so you should end up with enough spare cash for copious tapas. The draft law states that foreign nationals will be able to work remotely for non-Spanish companies while living in Spain without a full work visa for between six and 12 months. It could then be extended up to two times. The new Spanish law is part of the country’s recent Startup Act. It’s been on the cards since the start of 2022, but was finally approved in November and looks set to finally become law somet

How to save money, beat the crowds and travel better in 2023

How to save money, beat the crowds and travel better in 2023

It seems like everything costs more in 2023, and travelling is no exception. But going places is part of who we are, and it’s going to take more than a global economic downturn to stop us wanting to get out and see new things. The world’s borders are open in time for a new year of exploration, and we’ve got some ideas to help you squeeze the most out of it. Over the past couple of months, we’ve delved into the latest travel-industry trends and intel, quizzed experts and regular travellers, crunched the data and done a fair bit of gazing into our crystal balls. Here are the results: our six key tips to help you cut your costs, swerve the tourist hordes and make your travels smarter and greener in 2023. Go somewhere you’ve never heard of Ditch flying for good Never travel in summer Embrace the package trip Learn to love the homestay And finally… get organised! If you’re looking to spend a lot less, feel less stressed and get the very best out of 2023, then read through our tips, trends, predictions and prognostications before you get planning. Here’s to a year of travelling better. Stay in the loop: sign up to our free Time Out Travel newsletter for the latest travel news and the best stuff happening across the world.

Spain’s new high-speed train links Barcelona and Madrid for just €18

Spain’s new high-speed train links Barcelona and Madrid for just €18

Fans of European rail travel are having an absolute bonanza this autumn. First France announced new high-speed trains, which will zoom from Paris to the Riviera in four-and-a-half hours. And now there’s news from Spain too: a new high-speed train service has launched that links the country’s two greatest cities – Barcelona and Madrid – for the unbelievably low price of €18 (£16, €18). The new service comes courtesy of new Spanish train operator Iryo, which is part-owned by Italy’s Trenitalia. Every day 16 trains now run each way between Madrid and Barcelona, with a service at least every hour. The trains will also stop in Zaragoza. Two other operators already run trains on the Madrid-Barcelona high-speed rail route: the state-owned network Renfe (operating as Avlo) and recent newcomer Ouigo. All that competition means that tickets are almost unbelievably affordable. Tickets with Renfe and Ouigo can cost as little as €7 and €9 respectively, while the cheapest fares on Iryo will start at €18. While Iryo may not be the cheapest on the market, that’s still incredibly good value for the 314-mile journey. It’s also worth knowing that Iryo is running all-new trains, which it claims are the fastest and quietest in Europe – and the most sustainable, powered by renewable energy and made almost entirely from recyclable materials. The company is aiming its services at business travellers, and each train has a fancy restaurant car, good wi-fi and a dedicated workspace in the third carriag

Europe’s last Covid travel restrictions have just been dropped

Europe’s last Covid travel restrictions have just been dropped

For two and a half years, travelling abroad has meant a lot of admin. Checking where you can actually travel; queuing up for official PCR tests; printing off your proof of vaccination along with your boarding pass; filling in endless forms… it’s become a way of life, a tedious but necessary bit of extra cost and hassle on any overseas trip. But now it looks as though that ‘new normal’ may be old news. Over the last few months, most countries have ditched their requirements for tests and vaccines. And as of today, you can now travel throughout the whole of Europe without any Covid-related border restrictions. On the travel front, at least, things are officially back to normal. Can I get an ‘amen’? The final European country to require Covid tests or vaccinations was Spain. Until literally yesterday, all arrivals had to present proof of full vaccination, a recent negative test or recovery from Covid. But at midnight last night, those final restrictions were dropped, bringing Spain in line with every other European country. That’s right: you no longer need to have been vaccinated, tested negative or recently recovered from Covid to travel to Spain – or anywhere else in Europe. Which feels like a bit of a moment. Some Covid restrictions for travellers remain in place elsewhere in the world, though: The USA requires anyone aged 18 and over to be fully vaccinated against Covid. Under Hong Kong’s latest ‘0+3’ entry rules, travellers must be fully vaccinated and take a test to pass

Hong Kong will pay for your plane ticket to visit in 2023

Hong Kong will pay for your plane ticket to visit in 2023

Hot on the heels of Japan reopening to travel, another Asian travel hotspot has started welcoming visitors again – and it’s got a very tempting scheme to get you to visit. The Hong Kong tourist board plans to give away half a million free plane tickets to encourage tourism in 2023. The Hong Kong Tourism Board has already bought the tickets – it purchased them in 2020 from carriers including Hong Kong Airlines, Hong Kong Express and Cathay Pacific as part of the government support package for the aviation sector. A one-way flight to Hong Kong would normally cost upwards of £500 from London or $1,000 from the west coast of the USA, and in total, it’s estimated the giveaway scheme will cost the Hong Kong government HK$2 billion to run. But that’s clearly worth it for a destination that has seen its tourist industry more or less completely collapse over the past few years – first due to the civil unrest of 2019, then the pandemic and one of the world’s strictest travel lockdowns. The Hong Kong Tourism Board says that it will announce more details of the free plane tickets once all remaining local health restrictions are lifted, aiming to launch the campaign in early 2023. Initially, the giveaway would target south-east Asian countries. There are still significant barriers to rebooting HK’s tourist industry, including the closure of Russian airspace and ongoing restrictions in mainland China. But  so a free trip to check out Hong Kong’s incredible restaurants, best-in-class bars,

It’s official: Japan is open to travel!

It’s official: Japan is open to travel!

For two-and-a-half years, travel to Japan has been pretty tough. Few countries around the world have been so cautious about reopening their borders to tourism after the cataclysmic shutdowns of 2020. But we’re over the moon to announce that travel to Japan has now returned to something that looks a lot like the old normal. Here’s what you need to know. What are the latest Japan travel restrictions? Following Japan’s decision last month to drop pre-departure testing, the Japanese government is now allowing travellers to visit Japan without booking a guided tour or using a travel agency.   In other words, a free-roaming backpacking trip around Japan is now on the cards! The country has also dropped its daily cap of 50,000 arrivals and its list of permitted countries, with visitors from all countries and regions now being accepted. Here’s a full list of all the countries and regions eligible for visa-free travel to Japan.  Visa-free travel has also been reinstated for travellers from dozens of countries (see which ones here), though there are still several border measures in place. If you’ve received three vaccine doses, you don’t need to take a pre-travel Covid test. However, if you’ve received any fewer jabs than three, you’ll need to show a negative test taken within 72 hours of departure for Japan.  The Japanese government is now looking to capitalise on huge demand from travellers to visit without booking through an agency, especially as the weak yen means that travel to Ja

Time Out Market is coming to Cape Town!

Time Out Market is coming to Cape Town!

Big news for anyone who cares about eating great food in amazing places: we’re opening a Time Out Market in Cape Town. And it’s due to open… really soon! If you don’t know about Time Out Market, here’s the idea. We pick out the best chefs, bartenders and cultural goings-on from one of the world’s greatest cities. Then we bring them all together under one roof to create an IRL tasting menu of the very best stuff the city has to offer. We started with Time Out Market Lisbon in 2014, and since then we’ve opened in Miami, New York, Boston, Montreal, Chicago and Dubai (with Porto, Prague, Abu Dhabi, Osaka and some other very cool cities in the pipeline). Next up is Cape Town, and the location is pretty unbeatable. Time Out Market is coming to the V&A Waterfront, a historic harbour on the edge of the vibey City Bowl district that’s already one of South Africa’s most popular spots. It’ll have 14 kitchens, all run by different top Cape Town chefs, and four bars with drinks co-curated by the city’s best bars. There’ll also be a stage for live performances. And of course there’ll be room for guests: 750 seats in total, including quayside tables with jaw-dropping Table Mountain views. Time Out Market Cape Town will be the first Time Out Market to open in Africa, and a big thumbs-up to one of the continent’s most exciting cities – and the people and independent businesses that make it great. And here’s possibly the best bit: opening is set for late 2023. That’s not much more than a year

バルセロナとマドリード間、新格安高速列車「Iryo」が登場

バルセロナとマドリード間、新格安高速列車「Iryo」が登場

この秋、スペインの2大都市であるバルセロナとマドリードを18ユーロ(約2,580円)で結ぶ新しい格安高速列車サービス「Iryo(イリヨ)」が登場する。 このサービスは、スペインの航空会社であるエア・ノストラムとイタリアの鉄道会社であるトレニタリアが合弁で設立した鉄道会社、ILSAが運営するもの。同社では、2022年11月25日(金)から、毎日16本を少なくとも1時間に1本の間隔で運行する予定。また列車は、サラゴサにも停車するという。 マドリードとバルセロナ間ではすでに、「Avlo」(アブロ、スペイン国鉄のレンフェ傘下)と、最近参入した「Ouigo」(ウィゴー、フランス国鉄のSNCF傘下)という2つの格安高速列車が運行されている。 これにイリヨが加わることで、さらに競争が生まれ、この2都市間の料金は信じられないほど手頃になっている。例えばAvloは7ユーロ(約1,000円)、Ouigoは9ユーロ(約1,290円)からと、Iryoよりさらに安く利用できる時もある。 競合に比べ、Iryoの料金は安いとはいえないかもしれないが、それでも314マイル(約500キロメートル)の移動をこの料金でできることには、信じられないほどの価値がある。さらに、同サービスの新型車両は注目するべきかもしれない。 ILSAは、Iryoがヨーロッパで最も速く、静かで、再生可能エネルギーとリサイクル可能な材料で作られた、最も持続可能な列車で運行されるとアピールしている。また、ターゲットのビジネス旅行者に合わせ、各列車には豪華なレストラン車両、充実したWi-Fiサービス、3両目には専用のワークスペースが導入される予定だという。 Iryoは今後、12月にマドリードとバレンシア間、2023年3月にマドリードからセビリア、マラガ間、6月にマドリードからアリカンテ間でサービスを開始する計画を立てている(AvloとOuigoは、すでにマドリードからバレンシア、セビリア、アリカンテ路線に参入済み)。 マドリードとバルセロナ間のIryoのチケットは、9月18日から公式ウェブサイトで発売されている。標準料金の18ユーロよりもさらに低く設定された、プロモーション価格もあるようようだ。では、スペインでよい鉄道の旅を。 関連記事 『Spain’s new high-speed train will link Barcelona and Madrid for just €18(原文)』 『JR東日本、新幹線を含む全列車が乗り放題になる乗車券を販売』 『世界初、ドイツで水素だけで動く「エコな」旅客列車が運行開始』 『2022年世界のトレンド:鉄道の「第2次黄金時代」が到来』 『東京、走らない列車レストラン5選』 『東京、世界の料理が楽しめるレストラン10選』 東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら  

More than 1,000 flights are cancelled due to French air traffic control strikes

More than 1,000 flights are cancelled due to French air traffic control strikes

Just when you thought the worst of 2022’s air travel strikes were behind us, France’s air traffic controllers have gone and thrown European airports into disarray again. In a dispute over pay, members of France’s National Syndicate of Air Traffic Controllers walked out at 6am this morning for a 24-hour strike. It affects not only flights departing and arriving at French airports, but also any planes crossing through French airspace on their way to somewhere else. More than 1,000 flights have been cancelled so far as a result, including 420 by Ryanair. The airline says that 80,000 passengers have been affected, according to The Independent. Other airlines to have cancelled flights due to the French air traffic control strike include British Airways, easyJet and Air France, which aims to run fewer than half of its planned short- and medium-haul flights. However, other operators such as Aer Lingus, Jet2 and TUI said on Thursday that they expected no disruption as a result of the strikes. Travel disruption is also predicted in the UK over the weekend following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, including flight cancellations during the monarch’s state funeral on Monday September 19. The French air traffic control strike is due to end at 6am French time on Saturday September 17. Delays and last-minute cancellations are likely throughout Friday and into Saturday morning, so if you’ve got a flight planned – especially if it goes anywhere near France – make sure to check its status bef

How the world is paying tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

How the world is paying tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II yesterday at the age of 96, people around the world have been paying tribute to the woman who ruled 32 countries and visited 117 in her 70-year reign. Her passing was marked by newspaper front pages on every continent, and even some high-profile republicans paid personal tributes. Here are some of the reactions from around the world so far. Australia is one of the 15 countries to have called Elizabeth II queen at the time of her death. Her image was projected onto the Sydney Opera House and landmarks in Perth were illuminated in purple, while prime minister Anthony Albanese said her passing was ‘a deep loss for Australians’. New Zealand’s prime minister Jacinda Ardern also paid a heartfelt tribute to the Queen. The Queen visited Canada more times than any other nation, and prime minister Justin Trudeau commented that she had been one of his favourite people. The president of the USA, Joe Biden, visited the British Embassy in Washington, DC to offer his condolences, and declared that official US flags around the world would be flown at half-mast until the Queen’s funeral. Tributes were also paid at US baseball and tennis matches. In New York, the Queen’s image appeared on the billboards at Times Square and the Empire State Building was illuminated in purple and silver. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Empire State Building (@empirestatebldg) In Belgium, the European Commission and the Nato headquar

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