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Jessica Davey-Quantick

Jessica Davey-Quantick

Articles (5)

The 26 best things to do in Toronto

The 26 best things to do in Toronto

Go Leafs! Okay, we still can’t get out of the first round, but we’re getting closer, right? Come on Papi, we believe in you. Of course, there is more to The Six than hockey. Much more, in fact, and this city within a park (or so they say) will sweep you off your feet. Canada’s largest city might be its most exciting, with fabulous bars and gorgeous restaurants around every corner.The best things to do in Toronto offer a great introduction to life in the world’s second-largest country, with its immensely diverse population, curious history and seemingly endless collection of green spaces. Toronto is infectious, to say the least.

The 10 best museums in Toronto

The 10 best museums in Toronto

The best museums in Toronto are among the best museums in Canada. There, we said it, now get out there and feed on all that culture. Whether you want to know Canadian history or stroke that chin while considering avant-garde exhibitions, you’ll find it here. You can even check out the home of Toronto’s first mayor while trying to seek out his ghost, a pained poltergeist that supposedly wanders the halls at night. The Six is where Canadian culture comes alive, giving visitors plenty to chew on before heading to the excellent restaurants for some more literal mastication. The museums of Toronto cover everything from the niche (textile arts, anyone?) to the mainstream (Go Leafs Go [please]), and they are ready for you. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in Toronto  

The best things to do in Toronto with kids and families

The best things to do in Toronto with kids and families

Curious about the best things to do in Toronto with kids? No weekend out (or family getaway) would be complete without a visit to each item on this epic list. We certainly hope you're ready to keep up with the youngest members of the clan! Whether it's taking in a new perspective of the city from the best attractions in Toronto or catching a glimpse of the exhibits opening at the best museums of Toronto, our picks will be a hit for all ages.  After catching a Blue Jays game or a play at Young People's Theatre, book a reservation at one of the best restaurants in Toronto so you can refuel with a delicious dish. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in Toronto

The best shopping in Toronto

The best shopping in Toronto

Start your shopping spree at St Lawrence Market. Spread between two buildings, the market has a little bit of everything, from antiques to a weekly farmer’s market that has been named one of the world’s best by National Geographic. Also swing by the city’s largest mall, the Toronto Eaton Centre. The vast shopping centre includes a range of stylish shops, including higher-end retailers such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Michael Kors and Nordstrom. If you thirst for vinyl, look no further than Rotate This, which stocks vinyl both new and old, as well as slinging tickets for most major concert promoters in town. Sticking to the retro vibe, you can then head over to The Monkey’s Paw, an antiquarian shop specialising in uncommon books and assorted printed weirdness. Still looking for something to read? Toronto’s independent bookstores are going strong, even in the age of the Kindle. Sleuth of Baker Street specialises in mysteries, crime novels, detective fiction and thrillers, while Bakka Phoenix Books, Canada’s oldest science fiction and fantasy bookstore, is the spot to go for dystopian futures and post-apocalyptic zombie tales. But if you’re looking for a sweet souvenir, check out Kitten and the Bear, a bespoke jam and scone shop (sconery? Jamtique?). Whatever you call it, it’s like a sticky winery, with a tasting room and retail boutique. It offers up all-butter scones made from naturally cultured buttermilk from Quebec, as well as handmade jams, jellies and marmalades using local, he

Sports and ice skating in Toronto

Sports and ice skating in Toronto

Despite Canada’s reputation for fierce winters, Canadians love the great outdoors, and there’s lots to do out and about in Toronto, year round. Winter brings the arrival of around 50 outdoor ice rinks around Toronto, including Nathan Philip Square, where the large water fountain turns into a giant outdoor rink every winter. Lacrosse might be Canada’s official sport, but hockey is a national obsession, and pick-up games of shinny occupy many rinks. If watching is more your thing, a trip to the Hockey Hall of Fame to bask in the warm glow of the Stanley Cup should do the trick. You’ll need that warm-and-fuzzy feeling if your next stop is the Air Canada Centre to watch the Toronto Maple Leafs. One of the original six National Hockey League members, they’ve won thirteen Stanley Cup championships, beaten for the record only by the Montreal Canadians, who’ve won twenty-four. Unfortunately, the last time they won was 1967. Even after a half-century-long dry spell (the longest in the NHL), their fans remain die-hard. Those of you who have time to spare for sports other than hockey (what are you, American?) can always catch a Toronto Blue Jays baseball game at the Rogers Centre. Formerly known as the Sky Dome, it’s conveniently located next to the CN Tower. Sports venue details The Air Canada Centre 50 Bay St, Suite 500. 416 815 5500.Hockey Hall of Fame Brookfield Place 30 Yonge St. 416 360 7765.Rogers Centre One Blue Jays Way. 416 341 3000.

Listings and reviews (15)

Novotel Toronto Centre

Novotel Toronto Centre

3 out of 5 stars

This is a budget hotel with big dreams. Ideal for those visiting for a weekend, it is just a five-minute walk from Union Station and down the street from the St. Lawrence Market and the Eaton Centre. Its 262 spacious rooms are outfitted with surprisingly lush bedding while the rest of the structure boasts crisp interiors and fixtures like an indoor heated pool. Despite its busy central location, the hotel itself is a quiet space, perfect for relaxing between jaunts around town. From 184.44 per night

Hotel Victoria

Hotel Victoria

3 out of 5 stars

Walk past Hotel Victoria and you just might miss the Grande Dame of Yonge Street, a tucked-away reminder of what used to be. First opened in 1909, it was built after Toronto's Great Fire of 1904 and was originally designed by Canadian architect J.P. Hynes as the first fireproof building in Toronto. Initially named Hotel, the hotel was an emergency hospital during the 1918 flu pandemic, was renamed Hotel Victoria when it sold in 1927 after Prohibition-era liquor restrictions slammed its bottom line. As a reward for surviving it all, Hotel Victoria had its original innards ripped out in the 1980s when the lobby was transformed into an airy atrium of steel and glass. Purchased in 1997 by the Silver Hotel Group, the lobby and guestrooms were totally renovated in 2011, preserving the charm of its original marble pillars and crown molding next to a new, sleek urban design. Each of the 56 rooms run a bit small but the building’s location and historical past simply can’t be beat. Found near Union Station in the Financial District, it's just around the corner from tourist attractions like the Hockey Hall of Fame. Starting at $174 per night

Gladstone Hotel

Gladstone Hotel

4 out of 5 stars

Toronto’s longest operating hotel has come a long way from the days the Royal Winter Fair touted it “the only safe place for one's great aunt to stay alone.” Built in 1889, the west Toronto landmark went from skid row to arts and music hotspot after a renovation in 2008. Each one of the hotel’s 37 rooms has been designed by a different artist, a nod to creativity that is also reflected in the three gallery spaces on premise that host a revolving door of exhibitions. The hotel has hung on hard to its roots, preserving the original Victorian floor plans and interior architecture. There’s even an antique elevator, although the stairs often prove faster. The Melody Bar hosts a variety of events, live music acts and karaoke sessions weekly. Food wise, the popular Harvest Wednesdays brings together menus inspired by Ontario’s growing season, featuring local meats, cheese, wines and beers. From $229 per night.

SoHo Metropolitan Hotel

SoHo Metropolitan Hotel

3 out of 5 stars

Owned by Metropolitan Hotels, which also manages the Hazelton, the SoHo is halfway between a boutique hotel and a luxury spot. The standout feature? Really big rooms: the 72 rooms and 18 suites are oversized and the penthouse suite occupies a sweeping three storeys, loft-style. The hotel also offers complimentary luxury sedan service to help you get around, making this a swank choice if your main goal is to experience everything there is to do in Toronto. To ensure the best stay possible, check out the myriad of offers, deals, packages and upgrade options before booking a room. From $300 per night

InterContinental Toronto Centre

InterContinental Toronto Centre

3 out of 5 stars

This one makes the list for its views alone. Beyond that, the InterContinental Toronto Centre is a great pick if you’re traveling with kids, as it offers several family-oriented packages as well as a pool that will keep the kiddos thoroughly entertained. Flying solo? The on-site restaurant, Azure Restaurant & Bar, will keep you busy with its glass canopy, breathtaking views and “progressive” cuisine. Originally opening in 1984, the property was rebranded as an InterContinental property in 2003 and now features 586 rooms over 25 storeys.  From $249 per night

Sheraton Centre Toronto

Sheraton Centre Toronto

3 out of 5 stars

When it first opened in 1972, the Sheraton was the second largest hotel in Toronto, and it's still going strong. The venerable concrete behemoth is located right across the street from City Hall, making it ground zero for tourists and families. Inside, the 1372 recently renovated guest rooms are large and well-decorated. Being the 33rd tallest building in the city has its perks, of course: spectacular city views to be gazed at from the Sheraton Club Lounge on the 43rd floor. But what really sets the structure apart is the rooftop garden and one of the city’s best hotel pools. The huge indoor/outdoor heated pool comes complete with a poolside bar, tons of lounge space and offers day passes for non-guests to take advantage of Toronto's steamy summers. From $237 per night

The Windsor Arms Hotel

The Windsor Arms Hotel

3 out of 5 stars

Located deep in the heart of Yorkville, the Windsor Arms has been holding court since 1927 and is a true Toronto landmark—sort of.  It was designed by architect Kirk Hyslop and has been listed as a historic property by the city since 1983, but the hotel isn't just part of the city’s architectural past: the Toronto International Film Festival was founded at the Windsor Arms in 1976 and the hotel still offers a private screening room. Over the years, it's been frequented by the likes of Katharine Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, Woody Allen and more, as well as being featured in several movies. Eventually closing in 1991, the structure was then purchased, and demolished, in 1995. Sol Wassermuhl of Page + Steele was brought in to rebuild it, preserving many of the original characteristics like the stained glass window facing St. Thomas Street and the stone vestibule at the entrance. The new hotel, opened in 1999, included a new condo tower. Today, the Windsor Arms offers 28 unique suites from 500 to 1,500 square feet, all done in custom mahogany based on 1920s French styles. It's held on to its historic, discreet celeb-hideaway vibe, and you can still catch a whiff of its historical grandeur, even if it's only by sipping tea by the original 1927 fireplace in the hotel’s tea room. From $440 per night

The Omni King Edward Hotel

The Omni King Edward Hotel

3 out of 5 stars

In its heyday, the King Edward was the hottest spot in town—originally opened in 1903, Everyone from Mark Twain to Louis Armstrong, Elvis Presley, Earnest Hemingway and Britney Spears has slid beneath its very fluffy sheets. Back in 1964, 3,000 screaming fans caused a riot after discovering that The Beatles were staying in the royal suite. That same year, rioters were back at it, this time causing a ruckus after finding out that Liz Taylor and Richard Burton shared a suite with each other instead of their respective spouses. The Eddie is gearing up for another riot this year, following the announcement that that legendary Crystal Ballroom will reopen I early 2017 after a $6.5 million renovation (on top of the $40 million renovation that the hotel’s 301 oversized rooms have undergone). If you’re seeking true, celebrity-like Toronto elegance, this is the place for you. From $279 per night

The Hazelton Hotel

The Hazelton Hotel

3 out of 5 stars

Billing itself as Toronto's premier luxury hotel, The Hazelton was also one of the first to go green.  Opened in 2007, the building was one of the first in the city to install a green roof, complete with high reflectivity systems to manage storm water and help control the temperature all year round while reducing the the structure’s overall carbon footprint and energy consumption—which means you can feel good about indulging in all the hotel has to offer, whether it's a stay in one of the 62 rooms or 15 suites, complete with luxe leather-clad beds, or a trip to the spa. But what really sets the Hazelton apart is its restaurant, ONE, spearheaded by chef Mark McEwan. Mixing classic French and Italian flavors with local produce, much of it organic, the restaurant offers something to tempt everyone's palette. This is the spot for those looking to be in the midst of an eclectic Toronto neighborhood while overindulging on all things luxurious. From $509 per night

One King West Hotel & Residence

One King West Hotel & Residence

3 out of 5 stars

If you can’t rob a bank, you can at least stay in one—and even eat in the vault. Today, One King West is a hotel featuring 500 suites and a two-story penthouse, but it started life as Toronto’s Dominion Bank Building, itself a heritage skyscraper built in the late 1800s. Modern day updates include a new tower, the Grand Banking Hall’s new meeting room function with a bar complete with Corinthian columns and imposing windows and the basement bank vault now used for private meetings or meals (and Instagramming wedding pcictures, of course). The suites in both the historic and modern towers are done in a crisp modern style that renders them ideal locations to plot high finance. Best of all: The hotel knows its clientele, employing a staff expert at making business travel as seamless as possible. Connected to the PATH and mere steps away from the subway, the hotel’s location is just minutes from downtown. From $209 per night

Shangri-La Toronto

Shangri-La Toronto

4 out of 5 stars

Look way up and you may find Toronto’s favorite haunt for hot-to-trot 20-somethings. Located in one of the ten tallest buildings in Toronto, the Shangri La Hotel is right out of an episode of Mad Men, channeling a time when paneling was dark wood, scotch was on the rocks and everyone was in business-casual (for real, even the hotel bar has a dress code). Designed by James K.M. Cheng, the hotel is run by Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts and located just west of the Financial District since 2012. It’s all posh sleekness with an Asian twist at the Shangri-la, from the in-room iPads connecting guests to room service and the concierge to the toiletries from L’Occitane. That Asian influence extends to Bosk, the hotel’s signature restaurant. But don’t get distracted on your way in: the hotel’s lobby is also home to a tea room with 68 hand-picked teas on offer (plus a five-volume book of cocktails, wine and beer… because Mad Men aren’t made with tea alone). From $500 per night

The Ivy at Verity

The Ivy at Verity

4 out of 5 stars

A converted 1850s chocolate factory, this tiny boutique hotel boasts just four rooms—but they’re well worth the effort of getting a booking. Sharing space with George, a five star restaurant, the women-only Sweetgrass spa and Verity, Toronto’s premier women’s club, this is a step back in time plus several leaps up the social ladder. Each one of the rooms is complete with marble bathrooms, handcrafted beds and balconies overlooking private courtyards. Located in the Queen Street East district, this European retreat is just steps from the Theatre District, Distillery District and the Saint Lawrence Market. Owned and operated by the Aitken-Gundy family, the hotel’s exceptionalism derives from its staff, which takes extra care of its guests, constantly making them feel pampered. From $399 per night