Get us in your inbox

Josiah Ng

Josiah Ng

Articles (58)

Interview: Bob Hardy of Franz Ferdinand

Interview: Bob Hardy of Franz Ferdinand

More than 14 years on from their iconic self-titled debut, Scottish indie rockers Franz Ferdinand are still going strong. The band behind tracks like Take Me Out and Dark of the Matinee have stayed true to their roots throughout their career, as evidenced on this year’s Always Ascending, a record laden with the same dirty synth-pop and raw indie sensibilities as their first album.Ahead of their show at Southorn Stadium next Friday, we speak to Bob Hardy, the group’s bassist, about the new album and what he’s looking forward to when the band return sto Hong Kong for the first time in five years.So, right off the bat, we want to ask about Always Ascending. How did it come about artistically, and how was it put together?Alex, Paul and myself began writing at the very end of 2015. We gave ourselves a lot of time to play around with Alex’s synth collection that he’s been amassing over several years. We decided that we wanted to make a record that focused on the idea we’d always had of Franz Ferdinand being a live band that played dance music. We wanted to push this idea further than we had before. Where did you draw inspiration from while making the new album?As a group of people we listen to a lot of very different music and it’s difficult to name specific records or artists that directly influence what we’re working on at any one time. It’s often the case that when we’re in the studio writing and recording, we actually listen to less outside music then we would when we’re tourin

12 of the oldest schools in Hong Kong

12 of the oldest schools in Hong Kong

Hong Kong has a proud education system that continually produces some of the best students in the world, and its top schools are often its most famous and its oldest. Given our city’s rich history, it’s only natural that the oldest of our 603 secondary schools and 29 post-secondary institutions have some colourful stories in turn. Here are the most historically notable schools in Hong Kong.RECOMMENDED: Looking for more golden oldies? Try Hong Kong’s oldest restaurants.

All the acts from Clockenflap you can't miss this year

All the acts from Clockenflap you can't miss this year

It's here! Clockenflap has announced its final line-up for 2018, featuring artists from around the world and canvassing genres from indie rock, R&B, pop, EDM, jazz, hip hop and everything in between. Lauded indie titans Interpol and R&B singer Khalid are among our most anticipated artists, while we welcome returning bands such as local heroines GDJYB. Out of the 88-strong artist roster, we round up 12 of the absolute must-sees.

The Hongkongers powering the local music industry

The Hongkongers powering the local music industry

Hong Kong’s music scene is one of the most diverse and talented in the world, where mainstream stars co-exist with a vibrant underground. Yet, very rarely are the professionals who run things outside the limelight given their due. Time Out heads backstage to meet five individuals who keep our music industry alive and well. Photography by Calvin Sit

Interview: Hardwell on his China residency and Club Cubic’s sixth anniversary gig

Interview: Hardwell on his China residency and Club Cubic’s sixth anniversary gig

Big things are afoot in our sister SAR as Club Cubic prepares to celebrate its sixth anniversary this Saturday by bringing in Dutch DJ legend Hardwell. And not just for one night either but for an entire China residency.First gaining popularity in 2009 for his bootleg Show Me Love vs Be, Hardwell subsequently spent the first half of this decade playing at major festivals like Tomorrowland and Road to Ultra, most recently completing his I Am Hardwell – United We Are tour in 2016 to promote his first studio album, United We Are. Known for transitioning effortlessly from one club genre to another, Hardwell can play everything from electro house to hardstyle, a talent that has cemented him a position in the top 10 of DJ Mag’s Top 100 DJs, where he ranked number one in both 2013 and 2014. We catch up with the tastemaker before he arrives on this side of the Pacific...You had a monster year in 2016, with tons of EDM festivals and sets under your belt. Which was most memorable?2016 was such a big year for me and I played some incredible shows, but the one show that immediately springs to mind when I think of 2016 is the closing night of my I Am Hardwell – United We Are world tour. It was at the world famous Hockenheim racing circuit and it was this magical occasion that brought to a close one of the biggest and most important projects in my life so far. I loved that final show and the crowd were absolutely amazing! To be the first DJ to play Hockenheim was a surreal moment.And of co

The 45th Hong Kong Arts Festival

The 45th Hong Kong Arts Festival

Now in it's 45th year, the Hong Kong Arts Festival is taking place from February 16 to March 18 this year and the acts are as impressive as ever. We've rounded up all the must-see events for you to check out, from gripping experimental dance pieces and riveting Cantonese opera to majestic classical works and somber stage performances as well as everything in between!

Review: Yellowcard The Final World Tour

Review: Yellowcard The Final World Tour

When American pop-punk quartet Yellowcard last visited Hong Kong, it was following the release of their 2014 foray, Lift a Sail. Any buzz around town then was nonchalant at best, with many lamenting the band’s efforts since their certified-platinum album, Ocean Avenue, was released back in 2003. Critics were appreciative but were watching the clock, thinking ‘when do they check out?’Then we got the big news in June 2016 as they dropped the single Rest in Peace and announced their final album, which is self-titled, and world tour. The tour is technically here to promote that one album, but the reason fans packed the house at E-Max Music Zone on February 8 was really to say goodbye.And what a night it was. Though we personally lamented the fact that we were returning to the Music Zone instead of filling a larger venue, the house was rammed and people still rocked out hard to a setlist that can only be described as Yellowcard’s greatest hits. It had the full musical and emotional range that follows any set from the band: Paper Walls hits like Five Becomes Four and Light Up The Sky got fans on their feet, all interspersed by solo acoustic treatments like Ocean Avenue’s Empty Apartment. Arguably the highlights of the night were Sing With Me, off Southern Air, vocalist Ryan Key’s tribute to his aunt who passed away, as well as newer tracks from the new album such as lead single Rest in Peace. And of course, Yellowcard bid a tearful farewell with their final song, the one that almos

Interview: Van Chan and Nate Wong on the Nowhere Boys and their new EP

Interview: Van Chan and Nate Wong on the Nowhere Boys and their new EP

Nowhere Boys are one of the most exciting young groups in Hong Kong right now. Since their formation just 18 months ago, the rock quintet have gone from playing covers at underground events to wowing crowds at their first arena show – a jam-packed concert at MacPherson Stadium in anticipation of their sophomore EP, Welcome to Our Hyperreality. The new release is finally set to be launched at a show on April 28 at Sai Wan Ho’s The Hang Out. Their MacPherson Stadium show and new EP, their first release on new label Frenzi Music, are huge steps forward for a group that only met at the end of 2014 at Backstage Live, one of Central’s late great live music venues.  “Between our sets that night,” lead singer Vanir Chan remembers, “[Nate and I] talked a little and he said, ‘Why don’t we start a band?’ I was thrilled because I had heard of him as a great drummer. I had been a part of bands before, but I never actually thought I would be part of a band as a lead singer. Most people just look for me to play piano or guitar or sing backup vocals, never in a lead role. I had actually wanted to take on a lead role for many years now, but never thought I was quite there skill-wise.” Chan and Wong recount the first jam sessions that brought together the five-man group that includes Fisher Kan on keys and violin, Hansun Chan on bass and Kenneth Ling on lead guitar. “I didn’t have much confidence in my songwriting abilities in the beginning,” Chan admits. “I would stay up late thinking about w

Interview: Ted Lo on jazz, Herbie Hancock, and tackling Chinese music

Interview: Ted Lo on jazz, Herbie Hancock, and tackling Chinese music

Love is in the air this February and the Hong Kong Chinese Orchestra is ready to make the city swoon with a collaboration with Ted Lo entitled Romancing the Jazz. Widely known as the ‘godfather’ of jazz in Hong Kong, Lo is curating a programme of jazz originals, Chinese folk tunes and Cantopop selections all arranged for the Chinese ensemble. Fusing his jazz sensibilities, the Chinese orchestra as well as pop influences – Cantopop stars Justin Lo and Gin Lee round out the programme – Lo is promising something special.Lo studied at Berklee College of Music in the 70s, the first Hongkongers ever to do so. Shortly after that, he earned his stripes recording with jazz giants in New York during the 80s, including but not limited to pianist-composer-legend Herbie Hancock, fusion drummer Jack DeJohnette, saxophone whirlwind Michael Brecker and bossa nova crooner Astrud Gilberto. After his adventures abroad, Lo returned to Hong Kong in the 90s and continues to work nonstop across the local scene, whether jazz or pop, and has been notable for collaborating with and mentoring his nephew Cantopop singer Justin Lo. However, we start back at the beginning…Hi Ted! So, what were your first experiences with music and jazz?My musical background was pretty much from the 1960s. In Hong Kong in the 60s, there wasn’t much of a jazz scene. It was all radio music. So one day, a friend of mine turned me on to this group called Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66. The first time I heard this kind of music, w

Special feature: Seven artists not to miss at Dragonland!

Special feature: Seven artists not to miss at Dragonland!

The music festival scene in Hong Kong is just getting better by the year. Of course, there’s Clockenflap and fests like Road to Ultra and the recently announced ATLN8 that should light up our ears later in the year. But possibly the most exciting of them all hits the Central Harbourfront stage between February 24 and 26. The Dragonland Music Festival brings with it some of the most popular megastar artists from around the world. Prepare to rock out with some of the best musicians in the business.Dragonland’s three nights each sport a different musical flavour. There’s an opening concert on the Friday by Cantopop legend Leon Lai before a Saturday that’s devoted to electronic music. Legends like Steve Aoki and Zedd are expected to light up the harbour with their beats on that night. The Sunday becomes more poppy and rocky, with megastar icons including the inimitable Black Eyed Peas, whom we spoke to prior to the festival, and pop princess Carly Rae Jepsen. And that’s just a taste of the talent on the stage...Expect a fully charged festival at Dragonland. Read below for the experts’ pick of the top seven must-see acts over the weekend that you just can’t miss! For ticket information, times and details, visit dragonlandmusicfestival.com.

Interview: Yuri Ng on Cinderella and spreading the word about ballet

Interview: Yuri Ng on Cinderella and spreading the word about ballet

In the wake of this winter’s massively successful Swan Lake, Hong Kong Ballet is partnering with choreographer and Yat Po Singers director Yuri Ng to continue its Ballet Classics For Children series in the shape of Prokofiev’s Cinderella. With the composer’s score, a romantic story and stunning choreography based on choreographer David Allen’s interpretation of the production, Cinderella is the perfect introduction to ballet for young Hongkongers. Yet Ng is going above and beyond. In addition to including narration to help inform children of the story, the production includes a Japanese narration (different performances have different languages), courtesy of Hong Kong Ballet resident dancer Shunsuke Arimizu. We speak to Ng to learn more about what he has in store...   Hello Yuri! How is choreographing Cinderella different when it’s targeted at kids? The original purpose of this series and particular production was to draw people in who hadn’t had much experience with ballet before. We have a narrator who is not only talking about the story but about the different core elements of ballet, like costumes and stage changes. For example, one of the ugly stepsisters is a narrator, so it feels like there’s someone on the inside bringing people in, to point out the different types of music at the ball, like whether there’s a mazurka or a waltz playing. It’s all been meticulously planned out and timed but the rhythm is relaxed and engaging, so people can get a sense that Prokofiev’s m

Interview: Moguai on clubs, crowds and candles

Interview: Moguai on clubs, crowds and candles

There are a handful of techno DJs who’ve helped push electronic music into the mainstream over the years. And one of them, for sure, is Moguai. One of Germany’s first techno DJs, Andre Tegeler began his career shaping the country’s nightlife scene in the 1990s, hosting parties and running nightclubs before he went on to international fame. Since his start he has also expanded his repertoire to electro house, prog house and other big room genres, leading to his signing with mainstream EDM institution Spinnin’ Records. He released his hottest single to date, Mammoth, with Dimitri Vegas and Like Mike and the Spinnin’ team. In 2014, it stayed at number one on the Beatport chart for an eternity. Now, however, Moguai is set to arrive in our sister SAR to give us his signature brand of electronic music, so we grab him before the set...   So Moguai, what were your first few parties and sets like? I remember those early rave parties well. Sometimes they were illegal and we only had electricity for the music. Instead of using electric lights, we used candles. You sometimes joined a big party with many people and the only light came from the candles. Those parties were awesome! It wasn’t only about the music. It was a lifestyle! Who was your biggest influence back then? Sven Väth from Frankfurt influenced me a lot at that time because I recorded every radio show he did and I loved his versatile style. That helped me to find my own style and encouraged me to be open to all kinds of elect

Listings and reviews (11)

The Wilshire

The Wilshire

    酒吧位置挺偏遠,但這個堅尼地城的隱世秘竇絕對值得一去!寬敞的空間設有落地玻璃窗,可以眺望到爹核士街及科士街。牆上放滿酒瓶,小圓枱、軟櫈加上小小的吧枱,環境舒適別緻,中央部分還可以打桌球。不論是飲酒初哥或是閱酒無數的你,這裏的每一款雞尾酒都可滿足你。

Draft Land

Draft Land

4 out of 5 stars

Antonio Lai set drinkers across the city abuzz late last year when he announced he was helping to launch a Hong Kong branch of Draft Land. A Taiwanese bar established by Angus Zou – also in the mix here – the concept is all about providing a wide range of cocktails on tap. Yes, you read correctly. Master mixologist Antonio Lai wants you to savour pre-made cocktails.

Upon arrival, we’re immediately invited to a stone counter where the menu hangs above the bar, almost like a fast food restaurant. On offer are two beers, two mocktails and 20 craft cocktails all served without garnish. Each is labelled with ingredients and strength. Unlike almost every other of our city’s bars, guests here can sample any cocktail that takes their fancy before ordering a full one for themselves.

With so many choices, we start with the Irish Gin Fizz ($90), a concoction of gin, whiskey, honey, pandan and citrus. Light and balanced, the sweet citrus and surprisingly rich carbonation cuts through the double whammy of gin and whiskey in pleasant fashion. We follow quickly with the Rum Stout ($90) which combines dark rum, pandan, black tea and porter beer for a supple, roasted flavour with an endearingly long finish. It’s a welcome addition in a city where espresso martinis are often the only known name in caffeine-based libations.

At first glance, the décor and atmosphere aren’t exactly what one might expect when heading a bar founded by two of the most brilliant mixologists in the region. Tables a

Yellowcard

Yellowcard

4 out of 5 stars

When American pop-punk quartet Yellowcard last visited Hong Kong, it was following the release of their 2014 foray, Lift a Sail. Any buzz around town then was nonchalant at best, with many lamenting the band’s efforts since their certified-platinum album, Ocean Avenue, was released back in 2003. Critics were appreciative but were watching the clock, thinking ‘when do they check out?’Then we got the big news in June 2016 as they dropped the single Rest in Peace, and announced their final album, which is self-titled, and world tour. The tour is technically here to promote that one album, but the reason fans packed the house at E-Max Music Zone on February 8 was really to say goodbye.And what a night it was. Though we personally lamented the fact that we were returning to the Music Zone instead of filling a larger venue, the house was rammed and people still rocked out hard to a setlist that can only be described as Yellowcard’s greatest hits. It had the full musical and emotional range that follows any set from the band: Paper Walls hits like Five Becomes Four and Light Up The Sky got fans on their feet, all interspersed by solo acoustic treatments like Ocean Avenue’s Empty Apartment. Arguably the highlights of the night were Sing With Me, off Southern Air, vocalist Ryan Key’s tribute to his aunt who passed away, as well as newer tracks from the new album such as lead single Rest in Peace. And of course, Yellowcard bid a tearful farewell with their final song, the one that alm

IQ Bar

IQ Bar

3 out of 5 stars

When California Tower opened in 2015, it became clear where LKF was headed. The surrounding venues, over the following year, became sleeker, like Master House and Wolf Market. And so it goes for the new IQ Bar, with its busy industrial chic surrounds and a lighting scheme that features clashing bright pink and soft yellows. As we settle in and peruse the menu, we're piqued by the Ginseng Martini ($160), which features a London dry gin infused with ginseng. With the spectacle of using a carbon dioxide chiller, we hope we're in for a treat but, alas, the drink is incredibly dry and flat, and although the finish is aromatic and floral, it's too short to savour. With a little more trepidation, we move on to the Lost In Hong Kong ($150), which is served in a kettle-like receptacle, with small tea glasses for the party. Emphasis on the gimmick, surely, but as we take our first sips, the spirit-heavy cocktail turns out to be extremely light and fruity, vastly refreshing and interesting, and perfect for sipping with friends. A hit and a miss, then, and as we return to the now-packed D'Aguilar, we realise we don't see ourselves heading into too many other venues here for a Ginseng Martini. So, to conclude, as Hong Kong's palate becomes more discerning, even on this boozy LKF street, IQ Bar may be a smart choice after all.

Mezcalito

Mezcalito

4 out of 5 stars

Central's On Lan Street is home to some of the crown jewels of Hong Kong's gastronomic scene. Gems like Kashiwaya, Lai Bun Fu, Arcane and On Dining reside here, each boasting plenty of dedicated fans. So this sets the bar fairly high for the newest watering hole on the block, Mezcalito, which brings the spirit-du-jour, mezcal, to Hong Kong as its star player. Mexico's answer to whisky and cognac, which is made from agave plants that are native to the country, has been catching fire around the world in recent years, so we head over to the new bar to see what all the fuss is about. Mezcalito is spacious and comfortable, decked out with low-slung couches, tables and floor-to-ceiling windows that open up the 27th floor room. Bearing in mind mezcal's unique smokiness, we read the cocktail menu first, intending to ease ourselves in. We first choose the Paloma ($108), a mixture of mezcal, elderflower, agave nectar and grapefruit. The spirit's signature peatiness and smoke flavours are barely detectable as the nectar and grapefruit pair smartly, leaving the drink incredibly balanced and, thankfully, incredibly safe as an easy sip. Encouraged, we then decide to try mezcal by itself. The house selection, Alipús ($98), is the perfect initiation, especially as it's distilled in Oaxaca, Mexico, the spirit's motherland. Served in a sake glass and intended to be sipped along with a salted orange wedge, we're told that this is among the milder mezcals. It immediately reminds us of Islay whis

Don’t Let Daddy Know

Don’t Let Daddy Know

The UK has Creamfields, Belgium has Tomorrowland and America has Ultra Miami. And now Hong Kong and Macau can boast about Don’t Let Daddy Know. The one-night-only electro fest arrived in Hong Kong last year and is upping the ante with a switch to Macau for proceedings in July. This year, they’ve got an all-new lineup for us to chew on, some of the biggest names in the business and also some of the best artists that you’ve probably never heard of. Fortunately, we’ve got the scoop on who to keep your ears out for. Which is everyone, really. BourgeousIf chart hits could be worn like military honours, there’s no-one in this lineup who’d have a jacket more colourful than Bourgeous. The Floridian rose to fame in 2012 with his hit Tsunami, which was frequently misattributed to industry heavyweight Sander Van Doorn before Pete Tong confirmed the song was a collaboration between Bourgeous and Canadian duo Dvbbs. Since then Bourgeous has signed with the mecca of house, Spinnin’ Records, and collaborated with labelmates Dmitri Vegas & Like Mike. With a sound bigger than the Studio City Event Center, Borgeous is an act to not be missed. CartaCarta might not be the most well known DJ from China, but the fact he’s Spinnin’ Record’s first Chinese DJ should tell you something. Signed just this February, he’s been busy ever since. After a mini-tour that stopped by Hong Kong, he released new singles in April and June before returning to our city for another massive set. Hailing from Shanghai,

Jazz Summer Festival 2016

Jazz Summer Festival 2016

Aya Takazawa, Jun 21 (Day 1)Japanese trumpet virtuosa Aya Takazawa comes to town to perform a set of groovy jazz tunes with the big band to kick off the three-day affair. Known for an established, hip sound, she’s joined on this first evening by Hirohama’s own project, 40 Sax Swingin, an ensemble of 40 saxophones all improvising in perfect unity. Richard Sussman, Jun 22 (Day 2)Richard Sussman, hailing from the Manhattan School of Music, headlines this night as pianist-arranger. He brings a star-studded resumé, which includes gigs with Lionel Hampton and Randy Brecker. Sussman is joined by Japanese pop singing duo KK Sis, who sing classic big band tunes from their native land. Alan Chan, Jun 23 (Day 3)Alan Chan has won numerous awards for his arrangements and compositions, including an award for a composition for a 67-piece orchestra. We get to hear some of his originals with the SNJO. Joining him is Kazuo Oguro, a longtime friend of the SNJO and a multi-saxophone talent.

Fragile Beauty

Fragile Beauty

Tibetan-born contemporary dance maestro Sang Jijia directs this latest interpretive production with the City Contemporary Dance Company. Titled Fireworks and Coldness in Chinese, the piece is about environments and the ephemeral nature of humankind.

Beethoven: Missa Solemnis

Beethoven: Missa Solemnis

The Hong Kong Bach Choir brings us Beethoven's seminal mass, in D Major, the Missa Solemnis. Conducted by Jerome Hoberman, this will be the most recent of only four performances in Hong Kong, the last of which was conducted by Hoberman for the first time in 1998.

An Evening with Pat Metheny

An Evening with Pat Metheny

DownBeat Hall of Famer Pat Metheny arrives in Hong Kong with his quartet to play two nights of electrifying fusion jazz. He will be joined most notably by Antonio Sánchez, drummer and composer of the soundtrack for Oscar award-winning film Birdman. 

Jimmy Carr: Funny Business

Jimmy Carr: Funny Business

One of the hottest – and bluest – comedians on the circuit, Jimmy Carr has just announced a third Hong Kong show in September due to a huge demand for tickets. We like to keep our pages clean of profanities where possible at Time Out, just in case your gran is reading. So writing about British blue, nay frequently offensive, standup artist Jimmy Carr, without using bad language is practically impossible. But we’re going to give it a try: the really funny Jimmy Carr is coming to Hong Kong in August to tell some particularly hilarious jokes. There. That wasn’t hard. Oo-er. Innuendo alert. Carr’s take on comedy is infectious... Carr was originally slated for two shows here but, just before we went to print, a third was announced due to the tickets selling out so fast. And it’s no surprise. The cheeky-chappy-with-dark-undertones performer is hugely popular with audiences worldwide, probably down to the fact that he can deliver the most cringeworthy, offensive joke and then get away with it by flashing a quick smile and laughing like a seal with asthmatic tendencies. Expect this sort of tomfoolery when he graces the city for two gigs on September 24 and one more on September 25. One of the most striking features of the show, which is part of Carr’s Funny Business tour, is that it’s being staged at King George V School in Ho Man Tin. Yes. A school. And this is a man who’s rarely short of a paedophile pun or five. A comedian who is as much known for his smut as he is for his wit (an

News (7)

Sónar 2019 announces full lineup with MØ, Thundercat, Bonobo and others

Sónar 2019 announces full lineup with MØ, Thundercat, Bonobo and others

Sónar Hong Kong has just dropped the full lineup for its highly anticipated annual and third return to Science Park on April 13. As the first of many big festivals this year, the event looks set to deliver, with acts that are bigger and better than ever. With more than 30 acts spread over 15 hours of performances and five different stages, each with its own vibe, Sónar is bringing us a fresh batch of international acts including the likes of Danish electropop singer MØ, multi-instrumentalist – and former bassist of Suicidal Tendencies – Thundercat, Brighton-borne trip-hop maestro Bonobo, among many others.They are joined by a selection of our local and regional scene stalwarts including all-female collective Mean Gurls Club, drum-and-bass tastemakers DJ Mengzy and Fergus Heathcote, cross-genre veteran Miss Yellow, Microlounge and Technodrome founders Club Kowloon,  Mihn Club resident Youry and more.Aside from the music, the day is complete with multimedia shows, talks and workshops. Click here for full lineup and ticket details.

Clockenflap adds Erykah Badu to lineup and extends Phase 1 prices

Clockenflap adds Erykah Badu to lineup and extends Phase 1 prices

Experimental R&B singer Erykah Badu has joined this year’s Clockenflap lineup as a last minute addition, announced this past weekend. She takes the stage on Sunday joining headliners Interpol, Jarvis Cocker, David Byrne, and Amadou & Miriam.If you’re miffed that Badu’s addition to the lineup came after the Phrase 2 price hike, Clockenflap has got you sorted. Before October 31, fans can use the codes found alongside Clockenflap’s announcement to buy tickets at the slightly lower Phase 1 prices, and if you’ve already bought tickets at Phase 2 prices, the difference can be redeemed as credit to use on site.Born Erica Abi Wright, the neo-soul songstress exploded onto the scene with her 1997 album Baduizm, which has been certified three times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. However, she’s best known as a member of the Soulquarians, a collective of some 12 musicians that appeared on a string of critically acclaimed albums from 1999 to 2002, including The Roots’ Things Fall Apart, D’Angelo’s Voodoo and Badu’s own Mama’s Gun all of which are certified platinum and were nominated for Grammy Awards. Things was nominated in 1999 for rap but lost out to Eminem’s The Slim Shady LP, and Voodoo won Best R&B Album in 2000 beating out Mama’s Gun, of which Didn’t Cha Know was also nominated for Best R&B Song. Though Badu hasn’t put out a studio album since her 2010 effort New Amerykah Part Two, she has still been active, putting out two mixtapes in 2015 and also appe

HK Profile: Mok Kim-wing, founder of Fearless Dragons running club

HK Profile: Mok Kim-wing, founder of Fearless Dragons running club

Picture running 42km. For most people, the distance alone is enough to make them think twice about it. For Mok Kim-wing, founder of the Fearless Dragons running club and pioneering athlete, there’s an extra challenge in running a marathon – he’s blind.In fact, since losing his eyesight as a teenager, 50-year-old Mok has been dedicated to championing the disabled. One of the rst blind students to complete the computer studies section of the Hong Kong Certi cate of Education Examination, in 2011 the social worker launched the charity Hong Kong Network for the Promotion of Inclusive Society, to help conquer the ‘digital divide’, promoting wider use of information technology among the disabled. Mok has also spearheaded numerous initiatives to bridge the social gap that disabled people can face in society. Most prominent among these is the Fearless Dragons. Founded in 2010, the running club features both disabled and able- bodied athletes – one of the few of its kind.The team, which does group training runs several nights per week, is best-known for its groundbreaking technique of partnering blind runners with deaf guides. “We have a rope that we both hold,” Mok explains of the technique involved. “We rely on it to turn left and right. It’s like bre optics, delivering messages. While we’re running, we can’t communicate. So we develop signals. When my [running] partner pulls on the rope, I know it means there is danger ahead.”A spirit of tenacity is Mok’s driving force, and was int

Netflix acquires worldwide rights to distribute Joshua Wong documentary

Netflix acquires worldwide rights to distribute Joshua Wong documentary

Online streaming service Netflix has just announced that they've acquired the worldwide rights to distribute 2017 documentary Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower to over 93 million members in 190 different countries. The documentary, which, over the past few days, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in the USA and was directed by Joe Piscatella, centres around Hong Kong activist and local champion for democracy Joshua Wong. No release date for the documentary has been announced yet, so it could be a little while before it reaches our screens here.“Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower is a filmmaking triumph,” says Lisa Nishimura, Netflix's Vice President of Original Documentaries. “Piscatella has woven together the complex and inspirational story of an unlikely activist, whose acts of bravery and conviction need to be seen around the world. In an era where we are witnessing heightened civic participation and freedom of expression, we are pleased to offer a global platform for audiences to engage on these issues.”Though the world is clamouring to know more about Wong, a key figure in 2014's Umbrella Revolution and one of the founding members of localist political party Demosistō, the big question is how well the documentary will do with local audiences. Watch this space...

Move over Gudetama! Sanrio's new character is 100% relatable

Move over Gudetama! Sanrio's new character is 100% relatable

Sanrio is known worldwide for its cute characters - most famously Hello Kitty and Gudetama - but responses to a 2015 poll for the company's newest character showed a strong desire for a more relatable adult character. Enter Aggressive Retsuko, or Aggrestuko for short.  The lovable red panda debuted with an extensive webseries - which is currently only available outside Japan over third-party streaming services - consisting of one-minute episodes depicting every office struggle ever, from obnoxious coworkers to overbearing bosses and disappointing personal lives. The best part? When it all becomes too much, she breaks out into heavy metal. Sanrio       We're sure everyone in Hong Kong's got something in common with Retsuko, 25, who is now making her viral rounds on the internet just in time for a new year of workplace grievances...   Sanrio       Disclaimer: We at Time Out love our jobs and office life.

5 ways to win at Clockenflap

5 ways to win at Clockenflap

The biggest music festival on Hong Kong's calendar begins tonight at Central Harbourfront, kicking off a weekend of some of the best local and international talent. But as with Hong Kong, there is always too little space, too many people, too much to see and too little time to do it all, so it's important to know your way around the festival. Whether you're a diehard veteran of the musical weekend or checking it out for the first time, don't forget these five tips to make your Clockenflap weekend the best yet.Bring cash. Lots of it.We cannot emphasise this enough. One would think that the Harbourfront being so near to our city's financial district that cash points wouldn't be too hard to come by, but according to our resident team of number-crunching monkeys, the average meandering walk over skybridge back to IFC takes around 15 minutes – and that's just one way. That's a huge chunk out of your favourite band's set!   Be like Clint Eastwood. Have a fistful of dollars.   Smuggle in a hip flask (but don't say we told you so)Even with the extra cash, you can bet on long lines at the many food and drink vendors, so, including the long waits, we wouldn't be surprised if by the end of each day the festival ran a bit dry. While we're never certain how stringent security is at these events, it will be chilly this weekend, so make use of that jacket and take a cheeky bev with you. Lines in Hong Kong ruin many of our daily schedules, but this is not the weekend to let that happen!Get

Five ways Pokémon Go in Hong Kong could get awkward

Five ways Pokémon Go in Hong Kong could get awkward

Pokémon Go got a beta test run in the US, UK and Australia last week, giving young (and not-so-young) trainers the chance to catch Pokémon in the world around them. With the app, you can find the little critters hiding in someone's mailbox, in the frying pan, near dead bodies, and, when Hong Kong receives its release, near some of our memorable landmarks. But Hong Kong is also a place where even the lightest transit mishap can garner the vitriol of the teeming masses that catch you in the act, which is why we've looked into the many ways Pokémon Go can go wrong when Hong Kong receives its release of the massively addictive mobile game (and we hear it could be any day now). Braving a (black rain) stormBlack rain is more than just a weather signal – to disgruntled employees and restless schoolchildren everywhere, this signal is a blessing from the gods, a decree to stay home and laze around. But staying home is not an option for the Pokémon master-to-be. While we at Time Out Hong Kong don't advise braving gale-force winds and near-flood levels of rain for a mobile game, we know there are those insane enough to try. At least there will be water-type Pokémon. Sitting in on Legco meetingsOne of the (few) democratic things that our government ensures for us is the opportunity to sit in on general meetings held by our Legislative Council. These are generally serious matters that are integral to keeping our city running smoothly, but we bet that after Pokémon Go hits the Hong Kong ap

The best things in life are free.

Get our free newsletter – it’s great.

Loading animation
Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another?

🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!