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Rheanna O’Neil Bellomo

Rheanna O’Neil Bellomo

Rheanna is the Food & Drink assistant editor at Time Out New York. She loves all things Ryan Gosling—that is, except for Eva Mendes. Follow her on Twitter at @rheannabellomo

Articles (23)

The best Christmas gifts for him

The best Christmas gifts for him

Boxers are boring, socks are stuffy and with more of us working from home, neckties are not all that useful. So what are you going to get him for Christmas this year? We’ve got you covered. The best Christmas gifts for him are unique, fun and useful. We’ve rounded up NYC-themed gifts to rep the city, one-of-a-kind gifts from NYC makers and experiential gifts for the adventurous dudes in your life. Don’t miss the best holiday markets in NYC either, where you can browse hundreds of gifts of all kinds. Gift cards are a great option too, so check out the best NYC restaurants and see what they have to offer. Read on for some more unique gift ideas for him that will surely please. Surely the guy in your life has a passion or strong interest that will help you pinpoint the perfect gift. Cocktail enthusiast? How about a DIY infusion kit. Fashion conscious? A lovely watch might be just the thing. Bookworm? There’s a book of the month club for that. Sometimes you just need a good list of things to get your brain firing. You’re sure to find something here to get him for Christmas. Then once you’re done shopping you can focus on getting into the holiday spirit, whether it’s Christmas caroling, holiday lights, or ice skating. RECOMMENDED: The full holiday gift guide

The best afternoon tea NYC has to offer

The best afternoon tea NYC has to offer

Afternoon tea in NYC is for those who fancy a scone or crumpet alongside a piping hot kettle of tea as a midday pick-me-up. It may be old hat to chase the yawns away with iced coffee and hot java at the best coffee shops in NYC, but the luxury of tea o’clock serves the same function while making you feel like the Queen of England herself. From hotel restaurants to proper teahouses, here’s where to go for the best afternoon tea NYC’s got to offer. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The 10 best tourist-trap restaurants in NYC

The 10 best tourist-trap restaurants in NYC

Some people equate tourist-trap restaurants to overrated hypebeasts, but this crop of crowd-pleasing eateries is here to disprove that notion. Sure, out-of-towners may show up at Katz’s looking to recreate that infamous When Harry Met Sally moment, but that doesn’t mean it’s not one of the best New York delis of all time. From the city’s best steakhouses to trendy bakeries to classic New York pizza, here are the tourist-baiting restaurants that are good enough for us locals. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The best cookie delivery services in NYC

The best cookie delivery services in NYC

Got sweets on the brain? When cupcake delivery won't cut it, New York's best bakeries will satisfy any cookie craving—and then some—by delivering everything from crunchy chocolate chip to fudgy double chocolate chunk to gooey edible cookie dough. After all, cookies are arguably the best dessert of all time. So what are you waiting for? Start ordering from these sweet shops for the best cookie delivery in NYC.  RECOMMENDED: See the full list of best restaurants in NYC

The best NYC Restaurant Week® Summer 2018 restaurants in Manhattan

The best NYC Restaurant Week® Summer 2018 restaurants in Manhattan

It’s summer in New York, which not only means beachy days and balmy nights but the return of NYC Restaurant Week. The twice-a-year culinary blowout offers $26 two-course lunches and $42 three-course dinners between July 23 and August 17 at more than 380 restaurants throughout NYC, including fine dining destinations, Michelin-starred restaurants, and some of the city’s best Italian restaurants and steakhouses. These are top spots in Manhattan where you should snag a reservation ASAP for NYC Restaurant Week Summer 2018. For more information (menu items are subject to change), check out the full list of participants for NYC Restaurant Week.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The best Brooklyn restaurants to book for NYC Restaurant Week® Summer 2018

The best Brooklyn restaurants to book for NYC Restaurant Week® Summer 2018

What better way is there to celebrate some of the best restaurants in Brooklyn than by eating your way through them during NYC Restaurant Week® Summer 2018? Between July 23 and August 17, you can enjoy a three-course lunch ($26) and dinner ($42) at top-notch eateries across the borough, from hotel restaurants in Williamsburg to a hidden gem in Carroll Gardens serving the best brunch in Brooklyn. Here are reservation-worthy Brooklyn restaurants you’ll want to book during NYC Restaurant Week Summer 2018. For more information (menu items are subject to change), check out the full list of participants for NYC Restaurant Week.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The best bakeries to order cupcake delivery in NYC

The best bakeries to order cupcake delivery in NYC

Cupcakes have long jockeyed with macarons, ice cream and pastry hybrids like the Cronut for the throne of best dessert in New York. But even when they're not the viral confection of the moment, we still crave single-serving cupcakes crowned with all kinds of decadent frosting and sweet garnishes. As soon as one of those craving hits, you can order some of the best cupcakes in NYC for delivery to your door. RECOMMENDED: The best bakeries in NYC

The best sports bars in the East Village

The best sports bars in the East Village

Bar hopping is easy in the East Village, where drinkeries run the gamut from buttoned-up cocktail lounges and swank speakeasies to rowdy pubs and gritty dive bars. But when you want to settle in and watch a game, you need a locale with quality brews and even better bar food, plus space to sprawl out and maybe even go wild with your fellow fans. So the next time your team's playing, head to one of the best sports bars in the East Village. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best bars in NYC

The best wine bars in the East Village

The best wine bars in the East Village

Sure, the plethora of cocktail clubs and dive bars have made the bar-studded East Village a hub for boozing 20-somethings for decades. But the lively downtown nabe is also loaded with top-notch vino dens for all different types of wine drinkers, from serious swirl-and-sniffers to fun-loving bottle poppers. When you want a quality glass, sip your way through the best wine bars in the East Village.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best bars in NYC

The best bars in Greenwich Village

The best bars in Greenwich Village

In Greenwich Village, there is so much more than cheap bars and karaoke dens that cater to the NYU crowd. You'll also find sophisticated wine bars, first-rate cocktail haunts, and cozy beer bars in the city's bohemian and beatnik hub. When you want to toss a few back in good company, head to one of the best bars in Greenwich Village. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best bars in NYC

The best bars and restaurants in Coney Island

The best bars and restaurants in Coney Island

Planning the perfect day at Coney Island—one of the best beaches in NYC—is one of our favorite things to do in the summer. And, of all the colorful things to do at the beachy Brooklyn destination, eating tops the list. From world-famous hot dogs to New York pizza icons and funky dives, these are the best bars and restaurants in Coney Island that you should scope out on the boardwalk and beyond. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Coney Island in NY

The best 24-hour restaurants in NYC

The best 24-hour restaurants in NYC

New York is the city that never sleeps, it's no surprise that the same goes for its food-and-drink scene. But we’re not talking about greasy, nasty, only-when-you're-drunk eats but sit-down spots offering comfort-food dishes at the best Chelsea restaurants, French fare in the West Village and the best pastrami in NYC. We've even thrown in some of the best diners in NYC that make the mark. So whether you're looking for a late-night snack or a full on feast, there’s always something to curb your appetite, no matter what time it is. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

Listings and reviews (28)

Kitchen 21

Kitchen 21

This expansive food hall is home to a clam bar, fast-causal café, craft beer pub, and rooftop wine bar—all inside a landmark Spanish revival building on the boardwalk. Run by the same hospitality groups behind the culinary programs at Yankee Stadium and restaurants like David Burke Kitchen, the massive eatery sits adjacent to the 5,000-seat Ford Ampitheather, making it an ideal pit-stop before a live show, or refuel after a full day on the beach.

Grand Banks

Grand Banks

3 out of 5 stars

If you're looking for an elegant seaside experience that rivals a day in the Hamptons, step aboard Grand Banks, the historic schooner turned oyster bar docked at Tribeca Piers. The waitstaff runs like a well-groomed crew, delivering top-notch naughtical plates (raw oysters, soft shell crab) like clockwork to the throng of tables on deck. If you'd prefer to simply sip and watch the sunset, two brass-tapped bars flank the bow and mizzen-mast, offering prime seating even without reservations. Though docked at amenity-rich Pier 25, the Sherman Zwicker sits just enough below deck for an out-to-sea feel, but with the glittering World Trade Center and spotlighted Statue of Liberty still in sight.  

Pig Beach

Pig Beach

3 out of 5 stars

Pig Beach slings delightful, succulent meats dressed to the nines in exquisite sauces to hordes of 'cue-craving Brooklynites in an expansive backyard patio and sprawling, 7,000-square foot warehouse. Outside, the smoke pit rotates rib racks, turkey breasts, whole chickens, and — of course — hulking slabs of hog until tender and falling off the bone. Drizzle your meaty order in one of the kitchen’s glossy sauces (brown sugar-honey, hatch vinegar bbq) and pair it with fellow comfort foods like mac and cheese covered in crushed Goldfish crackers and house-made sweet and sour pickles. On weekends you may need to stake out space at one of the communal picnic tables, and wade through dog- and stroller-wielding families, but the grub is well worth it. Did we mention you can also score decadent, cheese-smothered burgers and buffalo-doused wings off the grill? But the deciding factor might be the bar’s spiked slushes (frosé, blue Hawaiian, lemon shandy) and boozy milkshake lineup.

Dear Irving

Dear Irving

3 out of 5 stars

It’s a scene straight out of Midnight in Paris—or maybe Back to the Future—all golden-age yearning and space-time shuffling. This dapper Gramercy lounge, from Raines Law Room operators Alberto Benenati and Yves Jadot, is a railroad space divided into period-piece quarters, including a tufted Victorian parlor and an ashtray-dotted hooch den worthy of Don Draper. Spend an hour at this luxe oasis and you’ll completely lose track of time—no DeLorean required. ORDER THIS: The cocktail menu, created by Raines’ booze maven Meaghan Dorman, features tried-and-true classics (Gibson, Paloma) and house creations like the Hero of Little Venice, an elevated rum-spiked root-beer float capped with fluffy egg whites and a sprinkling of nutmeg. The well-balanced Whiskey Business highlights rye’s spicy bite with smoky ancho chile, tempered with bright lemon, while the baking-spice backbeat of the lime-and-hibiscus Santa Rosa—garnished flamboyantly with mint sprigs and a cherry—imparts a bitter, earthy finish. GOOD FOR: Feeding your nostalgic whims. The era hopping begins with black-leather club chairs and vintage glamour shots in the meticulous mid-20th-century room, flowing back into a Gatsby-esque display of decadence—crystal curtains veil banquettes, and art deco splashes everything from the gold-striped floor to the glittering tin ceiling; beyond that, a rococo, gold-leaf-kissed salon that would make Marie Antoinette swoon. Fittingly, the tunes run the gamut of Parisian accordion riffs, big

The Honeywell

The Honeywell

At this sly, effortlessly cool '70s-styled cocktail den, bartenders torch cocoa butter atop the frothy, rum-and-whole egg Disco Inferno; stir a pisco-tinged concotion and red wine ice cubes into a glowing, off-menu lava lamp tipple; and pour sips of wine directly into patrons' mouths from traditonal Spanish porrons. Retro funk beats and amber lighting might at first remind you of your grandparents' basement—as do the wood paneling, beaded curtains, and cheese ball appetizers—but the quaffs and the service are far from out of style.

Pod 39 Rooftop

Pod 39 Rooftop

This sky-high bar atop the Pod 39 hotel offers prime views of the Empire State and Chrysler buildings but it's the ivy-clad brick archways, glowy string lights, and Mexican tile-topped tables that create this watering hole's vibrant piazza feel. April Bloomfield's formidable Salvation Taco dispatches inventive tortillas (short rib in coconut curry, chicken tinga) from the first-floor restaurant while the bar slings frozen margaritas, agave-leaning craft cocktails, and imported beers.    

West-bourne

West-bourne

Inspired by 1960s Los Angeles, this California cool café in SoHo boasts a flavor-packed, health-driven menu that won’t leave you feeling guilty or lethargic. That said, the plates—named for neighborhoods and institutions around L.A.—don’t follow any strict nutritional rules, but rather a general ethos of wellness lead by owner and Golden State native Camilla Marcus. The healthful additions from the open kitchen are smart and subtle, like buckwheat in vanilla crème-fraîche–topped Malibu waffles, a pair of Echo Tacos loaded with potato-pepper hash and crisp romaine, and, of course, a chia pudding tinged with coconut and decorated with toasted almonds and fresh raspberries. If nothing else, the donation from every purchase to the poverty-fighting Robin Hood Foundation will leave you feeling pretty damn full.

Le Petit Café

Le Petit Café

The unassuming storefront seems at first to live up to its name, but step beyond the grab-and-go counter through stone archways to a sprawling, though enclosed, back patio where the flourishing outdoors are brought inside. Replete hanging planters cascading greenery overhead, floor-to-ceiling windows and a skylight drenching the reclaimed wood tables with sunlight, the French country restaurant feels more like a greenhouse than a dining room. Outdoor eaters will love the year-round availability and whimsical allure of glowing string lights, rustic brick walls, and charming menu of dainty tea cakes and fresh, flaky croissants.

Brooklyn Heights Social Club

Brooklyn Heights Social Club

Offering arguably the most dazzling panoramic views of the Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan skyline, this cocktail club with floor-to-ceilling windows is perched atop the Hotel Brooklyn Bridge. The unique, eye-level perspective definitely draws a crowd, as does the extensive champagne docket and craft cocktails made with offbeat elixirs like wormwood and bison grass by Albert Trummer (Apothéke). If you can snag one, settle into one of the sleek leather couches to watch the sweeping, 180-degree sunset. 

Mess Hall

Mess Hall

4 out of 5 stars

Too often, a New York beer hall means a vast room overpopulated with rowdy, brew-slamming bros and a staff who, understandably, can’t keep up with the demand for pints and pretzels. Narrowing that craft-beer concept into a small-scale operation, this Harlem tavern cherry-picks the best parts of biergarten-ing without all the red-faced fuss, serving craft beers and bourbon in an easygoing, lodgelike space, decked out in flea-market finds like mountain-landscape paintings, hunter-green wainscoting and even a taxidermy boar. It’s an outdoorsy, all-American spot that almost feels like summer camp—this time with good booze. ORDER THIS: Pints hop across the country, from local drafts like Blue Point Lager ($6) and Ommegang Witte ($6) to Midwestern options like Bell’s Two Hearted IPA out of Michigan ($7) and Colorado’s Left Hand Nitro Milk Stout ($8). Not a hops-head? Bourbon flights ($25–$30) are quaintly served in vintage muffin tins—just pick any three on the list, ranging from woodsy Knob Creek Smoked Maple to small-batch Elijah Craig 12-year. Or venture to the wide-ranging cocktails ($12), like a hickory-smoked Campfire Manhattan laced with maple-infused bourbon and bobbing with house-made beef jerky, and a jalapeño-cranberry Dante’s Punch ramped up with tequila and a fiery chile-salt rim. For lighter sips, the Garden Party, a tart-and-tangy vodka refresher, is muddled with basil and lime, while the Messy Lady whirls together herbal elderflower liquor with bright juniper-forwar

Mace

Mace

4 out of 5 stars

Getting maced in the East Village might sound like a New York nightmare, but not at Greg Boehm and Nico de Soto’s cocktail club (named after the nutmeglike spice, not the eye-burning pepper spray). The barmen (Boilermaker and Experimental Cocktail Club, respectively) center the booze menu on international flavors from their collective time abroad, with each cocktail titled for a spice used in it. Those imported seasonings are showcased in mason jars around the spice-market–inspired space, and also turn up in the bar snacks from Maharlika chef Miguel Trinidad. The goods here are bold, sure, but with just enough temperance to leave you wanting more. ORDER THIS: Don’t shy from the namesake coup ($13), a tangy-sweet candied-beet number that’s misted with earthy mace at the table. The soft green-colored Grass ($13), laced with white-tea–infused shochu and grass cordial, is served in a Japanese teacup and hints at summertime, as does the hay-fat–washed cognac Chamomile ($16), cut with zesty lemon and a bit of bubbly. The vodka-based Cardamom ($13) pairs pistachio with nutty cold-brew coffee and just enough of the baking spice to warm up the froth-topped mug. GOOD FOR: Heating up your next date. The exotic menu means you’ll have to be a bit daring, sipping strange spices such as Filipino pandan and Indian ambrette. The cozy, golden-glowy space is virtually made for close encounters, sparsely decorated with a zinc-topped bar and tiny two-top tables that give you just enough room for

Porchlight

Porchlight

4 out of 5 stars

With 30 years and 13 restaurants under his belt, Danny Meyer has built one of the most recognizable gastro empires in New York. The latest project to join his ranks, a partnership with Blue Smoke lieutenants Mark Maynard-Parisi and Jean-Paul Bourgeois, is a Southern-twanged cocktail lounge that puts the restaurateur onto the drinks scene for the first time in his decades-long career. The sleek Chelsea drinkery is decked out with homey touches (the back game room is filled with retro boards including Life and Yahtzee) and a rustic, reclaimed-wood bar helmed by Nicholas Bennett (Booker and Dax), turning out first-rate down-home sips that don’t mimic the real deal but instead redefine ’em. ORDER THIS: Stiff drinks ($14) like a house-bottled whiskey-and-cola, cracked open and poured tableside. Kissed with herbal amaro, it’s potent enough to sip slowly throughout the night. Equally hefty are the orange-spiced rye-Cardamaro Flagg Day and the supremely smoky Gun Metal Blue, just barely splashed with curaçao and peach brandy. Bennett’s New York Sour gets a welcome froth from sudsy egg white, while his riff on the Hurricane, dubbed the Storm’s Brewin’, whirls the grenadine-rum pairing with apple, lemon and passion fruit. GOOD FOR: Laidback Gothamites and homesick down-South transplants. The cozy country vibes come courtesy of lived-in leather booths, vintage ceramic plates scrolled with grandma-style florals and even a “porch” stage for bluegrass and jazz musicians. But the rural touc

News (195)

Here's your perfect Day of the Dead weekend

Here's your perfect Day of the Dead weekend

Mexican cuisine is definitely having a moment: In the last few weeks, highly anticipated cocinas like Cosme, Empellón al Pastor and Tijuana Picnic have cropped up across the city. To celebrate Dia de los Muertos—the centuries-old Latin American tradition of commemorating the spirits of the departed—this weekend, many of Gotham's best Mexican restaurants will be slinging tequila, hosting day-long happy hours, leading cooking demonstrations and serving holiday menus with tons of tacos. Here’s a day-by-day guide to the essentials:  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Day of the Dead celebrations FRIDAY Sons of EssexThe old New York-style restaurant is transforming into a haunted cantina on Halloween, offering Mexican plates like carnitas with pico de gallo and creamy queso fresco and loaded Nachos Locos. One-time-only cocktails include Jack the Tippler (Jack Daniels, pumpkin puree, maple syrup) and the Harvest Spiced Cider (rum, apple cider, pumpkin puree). Get bonus points—and a free shot of tequila—if you dress up in themed garb like calaveras (sugar skull) masks.   SATURDAYCafé el PresidenteGet your hands on the buzzy book, Mexico: The Cookbook and meet author Margarita Carillo Arronte during this tasting event at the Mexican-style market. From 7–10pm, nosh on small plates created by Arronte and Tacombi chef Jason DeBriere, throw back Casa Noble tequila cocktails and Negra Modelo suds and listen to live jazz performances by Cristina Kaminis. Tickets are $60, which includes a copy of t

4 events you can't miss at the Feast of San Gennaro

4 events you can't miss at the Feast of San Gennaro

Now in its 88th year, the Feast of San Gennaro—a celebration of the patron saint of Naples—will fill the streets of Little Italy with carnival games, a cannoli-eating contest and marching-band parades tomorrow through Sunday, Sept. 21. Mulberry Street eateries like Balaboosta will serve street snacks like tomato-basil falafel and roasted cauliflower with tahini from booths outside their front doors, while the Parm team will unleash brand-new bites from their forthcoming bagel shop. Here are the four events you can't miss this year:  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Feast of San GennaroDrool over the World’s Largest CannoliWe’ve all had one—that classic Sicilian pastry oozing with sweet cream and chocolate chips, surrounded by a crisp, light shell. At this year’s festival, Ferrara Bakery and Café  will debut what they hope to be the world’s largest cannoli. Weighing in at 350 pounds, the 12-foot titan of a dessert will be unveiled in front of the bakery on Saturday, Sept. 20 at 3pm as onlookers munch on 2-inch mini cannoli. After fried in the bakery's New Jersey factory, the larger-than-life pastry shell will be delivered to Little Italy via truck and then filled with massive amounts of ricotta. The current record-holding cannoli from the Cake Bin Bakery in Newburgh, New York weighed in at 123 pounds and took a slot in the Guinness World Records in 2010. The folks at Ferrara are more than doubling the dessert and this is your chance to see what they're, er, it's really made of. 195

Vendy Plaza brings NYC's best food trucks to Harlem

Vendy Plaza brings NYC's best food trucks to Harlem

Argentine empanada at NuchasPhoto: Caroline Voagen Nelson Remember when we said uptown is the new downtown? Well the Vendy Awards are following suit and heading to Harlem. Every Sunday through Nov 23, the street-eats organization will bring some of the city's best food trucks to an open-air market, offering some of the best grab-and-go bites from vendors like Nuchas, Wafels & Dinges and Zha Pan Asian.  From noon–6pm, you can walk through Vendy Plaza at La Marqueta (1590 Park Ave at E 115 St) to fill up on Snowday’s maple-syrup–drizzled snacks (think maple-cheddar grilled cheese), Ice & Vice’s floats (tea-infused ice cream and hot chai-spiced pear cider) and ice cream sandwiches (toasted milk ice cream between chocolate-chip brownies) and Khao Man Gai’s signature Thai-spiced chicken and rice. There’ll also be a beer bar manned by Brooklyn Brewery and live music by Latin-Jazz fusion band Trombeatz. After stuffing yourself silly, explore the nabe: We found the best activities in Harlem. La MarquetaPhoto: Courtesy of La Marqueta

The best street eats and food trucks at the 10th annual Vendy Awards

The best street eats and food trucks at the 10th annual Vendy Awards

Food trucks have become part of New Yorkers' everyday lives much like bodega coffee and subway rides. The Vendy Awards kick things up a notch by celebrating the city's best kitchens-on-wheels with a day-long feast and awards ceremony. On Saturday, more than 2,500 foodies flocked to Governors Island to eat from and vote for the best mobile eats in Gotham. At the competition, 25 food trucks and street carts vied for the coveted Vendy Cup, People's Choice, Best Dessert and Rookie of the Year awards. This year, the brand-new Master's Cup category pinned past Vendy Cup winners against each other in a smackdown judged by Iron Chef's Alex Guarnaschelli (Butter), Food Network's Adam Richman and City Grit's Sarah Simmons (Birds & Bubbles). Check out our photos from the day, including this year's winners and their best street eats.   RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the Vendy Awards Chipotle pork quesadilla, Baja fish taco and plaintain chips from Calexico Hibiscus, passionfruit and dulce le leche doughnuts from Dough Pulled pork slider and homemade passionfruit and hibiscus sodas from Bolivian Llama Party Solber Pupusa Farmer Boy sundae from Ice and Vice Maple-drizzled grilled cheese from Snowday Alex Guarnaschelli, Adam Richman and Sarah Simmons at the judges' table Calexico won the Master's Cup Nuchas won the People's Choice Award Cinnamon Snail won the Vendy Cup

Watch the U.S. Open and play table tennis at the Refinery Hotel

Watch the U.S. Open and play table tennis at the Refinery Hotel

If you can’t get to the U.S. Open to nosh on Mario Carbone’s sandwiches or peruse the restaurants near the stadium—and you’d rather not crowd into a sports bar with loudspeaker-level audio—head to the Garment District. (Yep, you read that right.) Next week, the Hatbox, a new gallery and pop-up bar at the Refinery Hotel, will screen the tourney on a projector, shake specialty cocktails and challenge guests to rounds of table tennis.   Starting at 5pm every day from September 2–8, tennis will take over the bar with $12 vodka quaffs including the Honey Deuce (Chambord, lemonade, honeydew melon), the Fleur de Lis (St. Germaine, lemon, honey, prosecco, blueberry-pomegranate juice) and The Ludlow (pear, cucumber, pineapple juice). Bring a group of friends for sets of table tennis or, depending on how competitive you are, start your own championship bracket. If your backswing is killer and your Ping-Pong ego gets big enough, there’ll also be a swanky Grey Goose-sponsored players’ lounge. MVP, baby. RECOMMENDED: Full coverage of the U.S. Open in New York

Parm’s Mario Carbone will serve sandwiches at the U.S. Open

Parm’s Mario Carbone will serve sandwiches at the U.S. Open

Mario Carbone and Jeff Zalaznick—two-thirds of the trailblazing team behind the red-sauced Parm and Carbone, plus the gritty cocktail lounge Lobby Bar and forthcoming Dirty French—are pressing specialty sandwiches during the U.S. Open beginning Monday, August 25. “This is one of the greatest New York events of the calendar year and we’re grateful to be part of it,” Carbone says. Originally from Queens, he grew up with the event, attending for the first time as a teenager. “We were immediately drawn to taking part,” he says. The panini are made in the Torrisi team's classic Italian style, one of which is a rare treat available exclusively for the tennis tournament. “We only break out The Godfather for the finest events,” Zalaznick says, adding that the garlic-bread–meets–grilled cheese number was originally created for The Feast of San Gennaro, the annual street fair in Little Italy celebrating the patron saint of Naples, Italy. But, he says, the Zesty Italian Combo—a hero stuffed with pepperoni, sopressata, salami, ham, mortadella and provolone cheese—is a favorite from the Parm menu. “We chose these options because they pair well with beer,” Carbone says. “We're treating this like street food, and when you grab a sandwich on the go, the thing you want to wash it down with most is beer—it cuts the spice in the vinaigrette-laden Italian combo and the richness of the garlic bread grilled cheese.” RECOMMENDED: Full coverage of the U.S. Open in New York Find the duo at the event

Tickets to the Todd English-catered Dîner en Blanc on sale today

Tickets to the Todd English-catered Dîner en Blanc on sale today

The flash-mob style dinner that hit Bryant Park last year is returning for its fourth edition on August 25. Tickets for Dîner en Blanc, which originated in Paris, go on sale today at 2pm for $30 at newyork.dinerenblanc.info. The secret pop-up picnic brings hundreds of New Yorkers to a surprise location in the city—revealed just a few hours in advance—for an elegant outdoor meal. Participants can only wear white and must bring their own tables, chairs, china and food. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Dîner en Blanc  This year, however, guests can order a dinner for two prepared by celebrity chef Todd English (Ça Va, The Plaza Food Hall), who’s cooking up four Mediterranean-inspired meals for two. The picnic baskets, priced from $70 to $90, pair salmon with chicken and steak with shrimp, but also offer vegetarian and antipasti options. “When I go out to eat, I order everything on the menu,” English says. “So when I was creating these baskets, I wanted to do the same—give people plenty of options.” Suggested wine pairings for the dinner, are—yep, you guessed it—white. Sauvignon Blanc, German Reisling and Austrian Grüner are recommended by English as they stand up well to bold flavors. “You need something that’s strong and full-bodied, with crisp tart and floral notes or acidic apple tones and citrus zing,” the celebutoque says. With Korean-style steak, chicken Milanese and grilled duck sausage on the menu, it's tough to decide on a winner. But the antipasti package might be the obviou

Dominique Ansel will run an ice cream truck in the Hamptons this weekend

Dominique Ansel will run an ice cream truck in the Hamptons this weekend

Dominique Ansel, the madcap pastry chef behind the cronut craze and insane desserts like frozen s’mores, will dole out canned sundaes from his pop-up ice cream parlor in the Hamptons on Saturday, August 2. The $15 Warhol-inspired tab-top soup cans are first lined with chocolate sauce, then filled with scoops of root beer ice cream and whipped mascarpone semifreddo, topped with macerated cherries, honey-toasted marshmallows and mini meringues, then finally sealed and frozen. After ordering, you’ll have to crack the top and peel back the lid. The hefty price tag (okay, so it’s not Hamptons-hefty, but still) benefits City Harvest, which will receive 20 percent of the mobile sweet shop's proceeds. Find the truck on Ocean Ave at Main Beach from noon to 1pm and then in front of fashion designer Lisa Perry’s boutique on Main Street at 2pm. If you want in on the hype, head to the Hamptons now—because we bet there’s already a line. Otherwise, hit up one of the city’s new scoop shops. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the Hamptons in NY

Pay 1934 prices for pastries at Rudy’s Bakery in Ridgewood

Pay 1934 prices for pastries at Rudy’s Bakery in Ridgewood

Rudy's Bakery and Café is the oldest German bakery in Ridgewood and, to commemorate its upcoming 80th birthday, the Queens landmark will be hawking pastries at 1934 prices (much like Veselka’s hit ‘50s celebration) during the Seneca Avenue Oktoberfest Stroll on October 25 from noon to 5pm. That means you can gorge on miniature versions of the bakery’s best—including jelly doughnuts, Linzer tarts, Black Forest chocolate cake and cherry-cheese strudels—for 80 cents each. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Ridgewood, Queens There will also be complimentary tastings of each sweet treat on the hour, so you can sample before you buy at the bargain price. The bakery's full menu will be on offer, including former MoMA café pastry chef Cristina Nastasi’s trademark marshmallow-filled oatmeal cookie sandwiches and salted caramel cake, plus gelato and homemade dark hot chocolate. When you're through filling up on desserts, check out the rest of the Deutschland-inspired street fair taking over Seneca Avenue, where you'll find stalls hosting cheese tastings, a beer tent pouring Finback brews, a kiosk doling out German pretzels, a pop-up library and a pumpkin-painting station. Take a break from your feasting to watch German bands and dancers putting on live performances throughout the nabe and, thus, stretch your Oktoberfest fun through the end of the month. Rudy's Bakery and Café, 905 Seneca Ave between Catalpa and Myrtle Aves, Ridgewood, Queens (718-821-5890, rudysbakeryandcafe.com) 

Eat all day, everyday at UrbanSpace's outdoor food market in the Garment District

Eat all day, everyday at UrbanSpace's outdoor food market in the Garment District

Outdoor food market UrbanSpace (Madison Square Eats, Broadway Bites) is setting up shop in the Garment District so you can grab alfresco eats now through October 17. Find vendor vets like Mighty Balls, who'll dish out spicy Italian beef meatballs with mozzarella and tomato, Mayhem & Stout and their short rib and brisket sandwich, and Black Iron Burger flipping double-decker patties with melted Swiss, applewood-smoked bacon and a fried egg. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to things to do outside in NYC The month-long food fest lines Broadway between 39th and 41st Streets through the pedestrian thoroughfares. Open from 11am–9pm everyday, it’s an equally smart pit stop for a walk-around brunch, quick lunch-hour bite and casual dinner date with friends—just snag one of the outdoor folding tables and chairs. Newcomers to UrbanSpace including Brooklyn Wok Shop will offer pastrami dumplings topped with sauerkraut and whole-grain dijon, while Frittering Away will pour ginger lemonade either hot or cold to satiate both summertime or autumn moods. Here’s the full lineup of vendors:Amali, The Baking Bean, Barraca, Batter & Cream, Billy’s Bakery, Black Iron Burger, Bluestone Lane, Brooklyn Wok Shop, Café Patoro, Carnaval, Charlito’s Cocina, Fredia’s Favorites, Frittering Away Lemonade, Gelato Ti Amo, Go! Go! Curry!, Kicky’s Kitchen Caketails, La Sonrisa Empanadas, Mayhem & Stout, Mighty Balls, Mimi and Coco, mmmm Enfes, Onigiri by Tampopo, Palenque Colombian Food, The Poffertjes Man, Red Hook Lo

Dinner and drinks to premiere at Prospect Heights diner Tom's Restaurant

Dinner and drinks to premiere at Prospect Heights diner Tom's Restaurant

After 80 years of morning and afternoon service, beloved breakfast spot Tom's Restaurant is adding dinner, and, more importantly, liquor to its lineup. On Monday night the Prospect Heights diner received approval for a full liquor license, which means it'll soon be open past 4pm and offer an additional 50 seats in its backyard space—you know, for all the extra booze hounds banging down the door for mimosas with their banana-walnut pancakes.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Prospect Heights, Brooklyn Run by the Vlahavas family since opening in 1936, the corner spot on Washington Ave is known for its steady stream of weekend brunchers waiting for tables and munching on complimentary cookies doled out by friendly staff members. Oh, and those cherry-lime rickeys—just imagine the spiked soda-fountain possibilities! 

Baked by Melissa says goodbye to its SoHo window with free cupcakes

Baked by Melissa says goodbye to its SoHo window with free cupcakes

After the news of Crumbs closing finally died down, we thought we were through with sad cupcake stories for a while. We were wrong. On Monday, July 21, mini-cupcake empire Baked by Melissa will shutter its original location, the little SoHo window where its bite-sized sweets were first sold five years ago. To bid farewell to her first shop, Melissa Bushell herself will hand out free cupcakes on the location's last day from 9am–2pm.  But don't fret, there are still 13 other outposts to find the tiny treats, including the East Village, Grand Central and Midtown West locations.

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