ArtScience Museum's permanent exhibition: 'Future World'

Who says art always needs to be deep and serious? Japanese collective teamLab invite you to let loose at their new exhibition – and we join in on the fun

Photo: Kosuke Mae'Light Ball Orchestra'

Art and technology collide in a spectacular way at Future World. The new permanent exhibition at the ArtScience Museum, on show for the next few years, features 15 installations by teamLab. Comprising over 400 members who come from backgrounds as diverse as engineering, mathematics and, of course, art, the Japanese collective are known for exploring how the natural and digital worlds interact with each other. So it goes without saying this show features more than canvases on bare white walls. The works respond and change according to movement and other forms of visitor interaction. TeamLab tell us more about five of the most eye-catching pieces at Future World.

'Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Year'
Photo: Marina Bay Sands
1/5

'Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Year'

‘This artwork is in continuous change, aligned to the passing hours of the day. Over one (simulated) year, flowers bloom and scatter. They spring up, grow, bud and blossom before their petals begin withering, and they eventually fade away. The cycle of growth and decay repeats itself in perpetuity. The interaction of viewers causes the flowers to shed their petals all at once, wither and die, or come to life and blossom again, depending on how close the viewer is to the work.’

'Crystal Universe'
Photo: teamLab
2/5

'Crystal Universe'

‘This artwork uses light points to create a sculptural body, similar to the way distinct dots of colour form an image in a pointillist painting. In “Crystal Universe”, the particles of light are digitally controlled; they change based on the viewer, who can use their smartphones to select elements that make up the piece. The result is an installation consisting of an accumulation of lights, forming a sculpture that expresses the universe. Movement of visitors also affects the light particles and effects changes in the installation.’

'Light Ball Orchestra'
Photo: teamLab
3/5

'Light Ball Orchestra'

‘Rolling the “light ball” changes its colour and sound. When a visitor touches the main sphere, the surrounding ones will be affected, changing the colour of the entire space. Combined, the light balls [are able to produce their own “song”, of sorts].’

'Media Block Chair'
Photo: teamLab
4/5

'Media Block Chair'

‘Each block has both indented and protruding faces. Fit the blocks together and information is relayed from the protruding face to the indented one, which changes the block’s colour. For example, fitting a blue block with a red block produces purple.’

'Sketch Town'
Photo: teamLab
5/5

'Sketch Town'

‘Kids can let their imagination run wild as they colour in and draw objects such as cars, buildings, UFOs and spaceships depicted in this artwork of a fictitious town, which takes reference from Singapore. It includes recognisable landmarks such as Marina Bay Sands, ArtScience Museum, the Merlion, and the Singapore Flyer. This is the first time the installation has been adapted to feature the city in which it’s displayed. These two-dimensional pictures turn animated, moving around the large screen. The artwork grows and evolves constantly as different images are added on, and the objects can also move at different speeds and in different directions when the children touch them, bringing the town to life.’

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