Restaurants & Cafés

The best restaurants and cafés in Singapore, including restaurant reviews and editors' picks

The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try
Restaurants

The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try

Welcome to the Time Out Eat List, our handpicked best of Singapore’s food scene. These are the tastiest places to eat in this city right now: the freshest, most inventive and most memorable, ranked by expert local editors. You don't have to look very far to stumble upon an amazing nosh in Singapore. The city is packed with boundary-pushing restaurants run by star-studded chefs as well as humble hawker finds that'll satiate your appetite for cheap. Narrowing down the best restaurants in town to a list of 50 is no easy feat – that's why we have separate lists for the best Japanese, French and Spanish restaurants among others – but these are the places we think are worth a visit for unbeatable food, electrifying ambiance and genial service to boot. Eaten somewhere on this list and loved it? Know of a restaurant that should be on here instead? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutEatList Find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews restaurants.

Hot new restaurants and cafés to check out in Singapore
Restaurants

Hot new restaurants and cafés to check out in Singapore

There are new restaurants and cafés opening up pretty much every day in Singapore. And creative chefs are constantly updating and improving on their menus.  This month, we have Thevar, a modern-Indian restaurant brought to you by the same people behind Michelin-starred Meta; 15 Stamford, the flagship restaurant of The Capitol Kempinski Hotel Singapore and more. Here are the new digs worth checking out in January. RECOMMENDED The 50 best restaurants in Singapore and the 50 best cafés in Singapore

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore
Restaurants

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore

If we could have our way, we'll have good food all day, everyday. But too much of a good thing can be bad. For those who dread vegetables and healthy food, you'll be pleased to know that it's more to it than just chicken breast and a mountain of mesclun. Variety is key and that's where these places excel. The next time you find yourself staring at your boring desk salad, think about all the other healthy food options available to you instead. Whether you're in the CBD or in the heartlands, these healthy restaurants all around the city help meet your #eatclean goals – without boring you. RECOMMENDED: The best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Singapore and the best vegetarian local food in Singapore

The best cheap eats in Singapore
Restaurants

The best cheap eats in Singapore

Dining out in Singapore can be expensive – but not if you know where to look. If you're looking to switch up from the usual long queues at your favourite hawker centre, these lunch spots provide a satisfying meal for under $10. From set meals to local favourites, these are the best cheap eats in the city. When it comes to choices, this city does not disappoint. Whether it is a comforting bowl of noodles you seek, or a stack of crispy and dough-y roti prata you crave, we've got all your food needs covered. Here's helping you spend less on lunch so you can splurge on the things that matter.  RECOMMENDED: The 50 best cafés in Singapore and your 24-hour Singapore food tour

The most romantic restaurants in Singapore
Restaurants

The most romantic restaurants in Singapore

It doesn't have to be a special occasion to treat your partner to a romantic meal. There's a time to dine with big groups and there's a time to go el cheapo but when the mood for love hits, it's best to take it up a notch with a proper sit-down dinner – with all the trimmings.  Whether you're planning for your first date, an anniversary or a regular date night out about town, here are our picks of the best value-for-money, romantically lit restaurants to wine and dine in Singapore. Let's get in the mood for love.  RECOMMENDED: Best sustainable dining restaurants in Singapore and the best rooftop bars in Singapore

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The best food delivery services in Singapore
Restaurants

The best food delivery services in Singapore

We've all been there. Stomach grumbling in the middle of the night, or caught in the rain and unable to leave home to get some food. Thankfully, there are plenty of food delivery services in Singapore beyond McDelivery, Deliveroo or Pizza Hut if you're looking for something new. There are those that specialise in Japanese rice bowls, Halal food and even hawker deliveries so you can spend less time in queues and more time doing what matters to you. Here are the best food delivery services you can count on in Singapore. RECOMMENDED The best catering services in Singapore and the best home dining experiences in Singapore

The best steak restaurants in Singapore
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The best steak restaurants in Singapore

Finding a restaurant that cooks a mouth-watering steak is rare, but don’t feel blue. Thanks to our well-done list of the best steak restaurants in Singapore, you’re sure to find a happy medium. We hunt down the joints with the juiciest and most marbled slabs of beef – plus chefs that know just how to prepare them. So what are you waiting for? Get a moo-ve on! RECOMMENDED: The best burgers in Singapore and The best rooftop bars with views in Singapore

The best supper spots in Singapore
Restaurants

The best supper spots in Singapore

Some calls can't go unanswered – we’re talking about those late-night stomach growls that you can’t shake with a protein bar. For something more substantial, saunter down to these 24-hour joints and restaurants that open till late for some post-OT or clubbing fuel. There's nothing worse than going to bed hangry. RECOMMENDED Check out our guide to Singapore after dark

The best chocolates in Singapore
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The best chocolates in Singapore

Chocolate. That classic, sure-to-please gift that can – depending on where you're at relationship-wise – propel you straight out of the friendzone or butter your partner up (hey, chocolate is an aphrodisiac, right?). And it doesn't just have to be just for Valentines Day, chocolates make for a tasty treat regardless of the occasion. RECOMMENDED The best dessert cafes in Singapore and the best cake shops in Singapore

The best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Singapore
Restaurants

The best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Singapore

There's more to vegan and vegetarian grub than a boring uninspiring mountain of leafy greens and raw vegetables. Whether you have dietary restrictions or just prefer to eat more greens and grains, these restaurant kitchens in Singapore are churning out wholesome meals that are completely meat-free without compromising on taste. Far from sad salads and countless carbs, these spots in town pack flavour and character into plant-based dishes. With cuisines ranging from from Korean and Peranakan to Japanese and Italian, vegans and vegetarians have tons to choose from. Time to ditch the bland salad life! RECOMMENDED:  The best vegetarian local food in Singapore and the best healthy restaurants in Singapore 

The best cafés in Singapore for brunch and coffee
Restaurants

The best cafés in Singapore for brunch and coffee

Whether you're looking for the perfect Instagram shot, a new weekend brunch hangout, or a mean cup of joe, these cafés in Singapore deliver on all those fronts and more. Need more than one cup of coffee to rev your engines? Go café hopping in Tiong Bahru or pop into the various coffee shops along Amoy Street that keep the caffeine-hungry CBD folks going. RECOMMENDED The best cafés with free Wi-Fi and the best cafés for dessert

Latest restaurant reviews

Restaurant Zén
Restaurants

Restaurant Zén

“What does $450 taste like?” – A common question I get asked about dining at Zén. After all, with articles pitting it as the most expensive restaurants in Singapore, it’s hard to look beyond the eye-watering price tag of a meal at chef Björn Frantzén first international outpost.  This is what I tell them. It tastes like snacks that have been perfected in the kitchen of Sweden’s first three-Michelin-starred restaurant. A thin tartlet holds beer-poached king crab topped with wild trout roe, a one-bite råraka with its crispy potato shell houses crème fraiche and delicate beads of vendace roe, and an intoxicating onion velouté foam hides a sweet blend of liquorice and chopped almonds. It tastes like uncommon ingredients you’d be hardpressed anywhere else in Singapore. Beautifully cooked marron interjected with puffed Koshihikari rice, Yukimuro snow-aged wagyu covered with ramson, pickled baby pine cones flown in from Russia and the most incredibly balanced dessert of sea buckthorn sorbet served paired with oolong mousse and match meringue. It tastes like the pure decadence of foie gras on rye and shaved over a semifreddo, exclusive Zén prestige caviar on a bed of venison tartare, chawanmushi with all the trimmings of uni, ikura and grilled unagi. And if that's not enough, there are slivers of white truffles that blanket a pristine piece of monkfish and a flurry of périgord black truffle black truffles atop its “grande tradition” French toast, which has been on Frantzén’s menu si

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Rizu
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Rizu

ENTER THE DARK, sexy space where black and white faces on plates line grey walls and a table for two leaves your knees brushing up against your dining partner’s – ideal for dates, not so much for business meetings. But when you’re paying $158 for eight courses and $208 for 11-courses, maybe it’s better if you’re charging the meal to a company account. First impressions are everything and the starter of cauliflower purée with caviar and uni – while extravagant – fails to excite. Next, we have a salad of five kinds of tomatoes (three from Japan, two from France, we’re told) with dull minced king crab meat. The portions are small, so we can’t help but scratch our heads and wonder, “what exactly am I paying for?”. Almost as if to answer, we’re served a head on a platter. A lobster head that’s still twitching, to be exact. Its sweet and crunchy flesh is served alongside pristine slices of halibut, seabream and tuna, but the fishiness of the mackerel lets down the otherwise decent plate. That’s how we feel about most of the other dishes too. The satisfying lobster bisque is light on cream and heavy on flavour, but the small chunks of overcooked lobster leave much to be desired. The A4 Sendai wagyu served with sesame sauce, peas and Brussels sprouts would have been superb if the beef had an even sear. And too much wasabi overwhelmed the nigiri. With small tweaks, head chef Noboru Shimohigashi could elevate Rizu to the level of his former kitchens, Michelin-starred Ryuzu in Tokyo

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Esora
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Esora

The first half of the year looked bleak for Singapore’s fine dining scene with the closure of big names like Restaurant André and Joël Robuchon. But now that we’re at the tail end of 2018, things are finally looking up. From the launch of Zen, the brainchild of Bjorn Frantzen of three-Michelin-starred Frantzen in Sweden to new fine-casual concepts like Basque Kitchen by the former head chef of Iggy’s Aitor Jeronimo Orive, a restaurant renaissance is upon us. Leading the revolution is Esora. The Lo & Behold Group’s first Japanese establishment is a treat for the senses. Even at night, the space looks washed in natural light streaming in from its cloud-like washi paper dressed skylight. It casts a warm glow on velvety smooth yellow cedar wood counter where the magic happens. There, chef-owner Shigeru Koizumi prepares kappo-style cuisine with utmost precision. Bringing together his experience cooking at three-Michelin-starred Nihonryori Ryugin in Tokyo and Singapore’s very own two-Michelin-starred Odette, he welds modern cooking techniques with an obsession over produce to create the perfect dining experience.  The menu changes almost every week, following the micro-seasonality of ingredients, so you never really know what you’re going to get. The only choice you get to make is if you want the five-course lunch menu ($128), seven-course ($218) or nine-course ($278) dinner menu, or the more premium and customisable chef’s menu ($348) and if you’d like to pair your meal with alc

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Skai
Restaurants Book online

Skai

Sky-high dining at the tippy top of Swissotel The Stamford

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
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Hawker spotlight

Hawker spotlight: Hougang Oyster Omelette & Fried Kway Teow
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Hawker spotlight: Hougang Oyster Omelette & Fried Kway Teow

Somewhere in the northeastern suburbs of Hougang, in an ordinary coffee shop, you’ll find an elderly couple toiling over giant heated woks side by side for hours on end, churning out plate after plate of fragrant and morish fried kway teow and oyster omelette. After over 30 years in the business, Lim Suan Eng and her husband Ong Lim Chong run a tight ship with ease. During service which officially starts at 11am, although they report to the shop as early as 8am, their tasks are simple: he fries up the signature oyster omelette while she handles the fried kway teow, while also taking the orders. It’s easy to work through a menu of just two items, and you can order according to how much you want on the plate, as with most orh luak stalls. The elderly couple work like clockwork. Order up and before you can even think about getting that tall glass of teh ping, your messy plate of oyster omelette or fried kway teow is done. A dollop of their home-made chilli on the side and you’re good to go. If you’re here for something healthy, you are definitely in the wrong place. Liberal in the use of lard, the oyster omelette nails the right balance of crispy and gooey, while the oysters – which they import from Korea because  – retain their plumpness and juiciness. Mr Ong also mixes in a tablespoon of hebi (dried shrimps) halfway through the frying process, of which you will experience as you make your way through the generous heap ($3/$5/$6). Suan Eng lets in that different people hav

Hawker spotlight: Inspirasi Stall
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Hawker spotlight: Inspirasi Stall

Queues form even before the stall is open for the day. After decades of serving staple Malay dishes, Inspirasi needs little introduction. Managed by second-generation hawker Rashid Bin Amat, 55 and three of his siblings, the stall’s roots can be traced back to 1970 when Amat’s late father first arrived from Indonesia and came up with Inspirasi’s recipes to make a living. “Back in the day, we used to sell satay as well,” Amat recalls. But after some experimentation, the family decided to focus on four signature items: mee soto, mee rubus, soto ayam and chicken porridge. For what it lacks in variety, it makes up for in quality. “Having fewer items on the menu gives me enough time to cook each dish with the attention it needs,” he explains. “It ensures that everything is packed with as much flavour as possible.” Order yourself a messy bowl of mee rubus ($2.50) and dig into yellow noodles that are cooked just right doused in a rich yet well-balanced gravy. Sweet potatoes, tau cheo and ikan billis are the heroes of the dish. For something a little lighter, opt for the mee soto. The chicken stock is boiled for hours in a cauldron so you don’t have to worry it being too watery. And though the mee rubus and mee soto ($2.50) are the perennial crowd pleasers, don’t miss the soto ayam ($2.50). Nasi impit and tender pieces of shredded chicken are doused in the same sweet and savoury turmeric-spiced broth to make for a hearty meal. The portions here aren’t all that generous but for the

Hawker spotlight: Yunos & Family
Restaurants

Hawker spotlight: Yunos & Family

Out at 724 Ang Mo Kio Market & Food Centre, a humble stall bears the name ‘Yunos & Family’ and this holds a lot of meaning, and history to the people behind the business. The Yunos family are a well-oiled unit. Each morning begins with 28-year old Afiq Rezza prepping and cooking for the day, with help from his father, aunt, uncle and 81-year old grandmother. Later, his brother and two cousins report for duty before they start serving customers at 11am. Yunos & Family is a legacy left by Afiq’s late grandfather, Haji Yunos Ahmad who set up the business in 1960 at Hastings Road before they moved to Ang Mo Kio in 1979. The recipes have remained unchanged through the years and so have the crowd. “I love seeing my regular customers, even those from my grandfather’s time are still returning to eat here,” Afiq says. There are four main dishes on the menu, mee rebus ($3), mee soto ($3), gado-gado ($3.50) and satay ($0.60/stick). There is also an extensive list of meats named on the menu and here is where the magic happens – it all can be added to your order of mee rebus. While stellar on its own, having a mee rebus with beef ribs ($6) and a begedil (potato patty) elevates the dish to new levels. We warn you, it’s going to be a sloppy affair sloshing around the bowl of egg noodles in the thick savoury broth. The ribs were slow-cooked, leaving the meat to fall off the bone easily. If you’re looking to really indulge, top up the experience with an order of mutton satay. The queues at

Hawker spotlight: Old School Canteen
Restaurants

Hawker spotlight: Old School Canteen

Take a step into the Singapore of the past at Changi Village. While it isn’t some seaside shanty, these parts are definitely more carefree. Fitting the nostalgic backdrop, blasting old tunes and peppered with vintage memorabilia, Old School Canteen serves plates of nasi lemak the traditional way. What exactly is old school nasi lemak? Ross Said, 58, the owner of Old School Canteen explains that the difference lies in the ingredients. The nasi lemak we know and love is rich in flavour and comes packed with an assortment of fried things and a small dollop of smooth sambal. But back in the day, according to Ross, it was a simple dish with lightly-perfumed coconut rice, a hard boiled egg, fried ikan tamban (silver-stripe round herring) as opposed to the ikan selar kuning (yellowtail scad) you see in present-day nasi lemak and even kangkong. The highlight of the dish, he says, has to be the sambal. At Old School Canteen, the sambal stands out. Ross works alone at the stall and prepares his sambal the day before as he believes it requires “resting time” for the flavours to fully mature. The rest of the ingredients are cooked on-site early in the morning before service starts at 8.30am. There are three different types of sambal to choose from: sambal with boiled egg, cuttlefish or prawns. Unlike the smooth paste you usually get with regular nasi lemak, the sambal here is thick and chunky. Ross roughly cuts the onions to add to the sambal’s texture. It’s the perfect balance between

Best restaurants in Singapore for...

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Michelin-star dining
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Peranakan