Restaurants & Cafés

The best restaurants and cafés in Singapore, including restaurant reviews and editors' picks

The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try
Restaurants

The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try

Welcome to the Time Out Eat List, our handpicked best of Singapore’s food scene. These are the tastiest places to eat in this city right now: the freshest, most inventive and most memorable, ranked by expert local editors. You don't have to look very far to stumble upon an amazing nosh in Singapore. The city is packed with boundary-pushing restaurants run by star-studded chefs as well as humble hawker finds that'll satiate your appetite for cheap. Narrowing down the best restaurants in town to a list of 50 is no easy feat – that's why we have separate lists for the best Japanese, French and Spanish restaurants among others – but these are the places we think are worth a visit for unbeatable food, electrifying ambiance and genial service to boot. Eaten somewhere on this list and loved it? Know of a restaurant that should be on here instead? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutEatList Find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews restaurants.

Mademoiselle Tang Noodle
Restaurants

Mademoiselle Tang Noodle

Founded by a former hiking guide in Tibet who learnt the traditional recipe from Mengzi, Yunnan province, Mademoiselle Tang Noodle is one of the few places in Singapore where you can sample authentic cross-bridge noodles. The rice noodle soup dish is to Yunnan cuisine what chicken rice is to Singapore – simple everyday food that's beloved by all. But unlike chicken rice, cross-bridge noodles are healthy, so you can have it time and time again without worrying about packing the pounds. Mademoiselle Tang Noodle's Signature Rice Noodle ($12.90) comes with 12 types of ingredients including fresh prawns, fish, pork, chicken and vegetables served on a special jiu gong ge tray, the most traditional way to enjoy cross-bridge noodles. Alternatively, go all out and customise your own bowl. Pick your soup base that's been boiled for over six hours – there's clear pork ribs soup, spicy pickled cabbage soup and mala pork rib soup, and throw in a wide range of ingredients that catch your fancy. If you're up for something spicy, get the glass noodles with hot and sour sauce, a speciality from Sichuan that will leave you sweating. It also serves other delicacies from Yunnan like tofu pudding rice noodles ($6.80) hot and sour dumplings ($6.50) and the handmade bing fen – made from the seeds of broadleaf plantains – is a must-try dessert. PROMOTION Present this listing at Mademoiselle Tang Noodle to enjoy a bowl of bing fen at $0.10. Spend more than $20 and get one item free during your next

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore
Restaurants

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore

If we could have our way, we'll have good food all day, everyday. But too much of a good thing can be bad. For those who dread vegetables and healthy food, you'll be pleased to know that it's more to it than just chicken breast and a mountain of mesclun. Variety is key and that's where these places excel. The next time you find yourself staring at your boring desk salad, think about all the other healthy food options available to you instead. Whether you're in the CBD or in the heartlands, these healthy restaurants all around the city help meet your #eatclean goals – without boring you. RECOMMENDED: The best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Singapore and the best vegetarian local food in Singapore

Gourmet grocers in Singapore
Restaurants

Gourmet grocers in Singapore

When your neighbourhood supermarket isn’t cutting it anymore, head to these specialty grocers instead

The best dim sum in Singapore
Restaurants

The best dim sum in Singapore

From old-school joints to modern restaurants experimenting with new flavours, here’s where you can find the best dim sum in the city

Latest stories

The best restaurants to celebrate Chinese New Year in Singapore
Restaurants

The best restaurants to celebrate Chinese New Year in Singapore

Mum too swamped to cook up reunion dinner for the family this Chinese New Year? Have no fear, pen cai-loving people. We've rounded up eight Lunar New Year feasts from traditional Chinese at old school joints to modern Asian dishes at hip joints putting their own spin on that classics. Here's where to go to celebrate Chinese New Year with friends and family to start the year of the pig on the right note – huat ah! RECOMMENDED: The ultimate guide to Chinese New Year in Singapore and the best Chinese New Year events in Singapore

The best cafés in Singapore for brunch and coffee
Restaurants

The best cafés in Singapore for brunch and coffee

Whether you're looking for the perfect Instagram shot, a new weekend brunch hangout, or a mean cup of joe, these cafés in Singapore deliver on all those fronts and more. Need more than one cup of coffee to rev your engines? Go café hopping in Tiong Bahru or pop into the various coffee shops along Amoy Street that keep the caffeine-hungry CBD folks going. RECOMMENDED The best cafés with free Wi-Fi and the best cafés for dessert

The best food delivery services in Singapore
Restaurants

The best food delivery services in Singapore

We've all been there. Stomach grumbling in the middle of the night, or caught in the rain and unable to leave home to get some food. Thankfully, there are plenty of food delivery services in Singapore beyond McDelivery, Deliveroo or Pizza Hut if you're looking for something new. There are those that specialise in Japanese rice bowls, Halal food and even hawker deliveries so you can spend less time in queues and more time doing what matters to you. Here are the best food delivery services you can count on in Singapore. RECOMMENDED The best catering services in Singapore and the best home dining experiences in Singapore

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore
Restaurants

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore

If we could have our way, we'll have good food all day, everyday. But too much of a good thing can be bad. For those who dread vegetables and healthy food, you'll be pleased to know that it's more to it than just chicken breast and a mountain of mesclun. Variety is key and that's where these places excel. The next time you find yourself staring at your boring desk salad, think about all the other healthy food options available to you instead. Whether you're in the CBD or in the heartlands, these healthy restaurants all around the city help meet your #eatclean goals – without boring you. RECOMMENDED: The best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Singapore and the best vegetarian local food in Singapore

The best Indian restaurants in Singapore
Restaurants

The best Indian restaurants in Singapore

Can you handle the heat? You have to, if you're living in Singapore where almost every dish packs some heat. One of our favourite go-to cuisine for something spicy is Indian food. You can never get enough of the array of curries, naans, chaats and more we have here. Spice up your life (and diet) by eating your way through these Indian restaurants in Singapore. Featuring north Indian cuisine to Bengali dishes, we scour the city to bring you a delicious roundup of the best Indian eateries and curry houses in town.  RECOMMENDED: The best Indonesian restaurants in Singapore and the best nasi padang restaurants in Singapore

The best supper spots in Singapore
Restaurants

The best supper spots in Singapore

Some calls can't go unanswered – we’re talking about those late-night stomach growls that you can’t shake with a protein bar. For something more substantial, saunter down to these 24-hour joints and restaurants that open till late for some post-OT or clubbing fuel. There's nothing worse than going to bed hangry. RECOMMENDED Check out our guide to Singapore after dark

Latest restaurant reviews

Skai
Restaurants Book online

Skai

Sky-high dining at the tippy top of Swissotel The Stamford

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
Papi's Tacos
Restaurants

Papi's Tacos

A hole-in-the-wall taqueria where you can watch the taco making magic live with an extra large margarita

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars
Restaurant Ibid
Restaurants

Restaurant Ibid

MasterChef Asia's first winner Woo Wai Leong's first restaurant is worth the wait

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Panamericana
Restaurants Book online

Panamericana

A hot new restaurant with an unbeatable view

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
See more restaurant reviews

Hawker spotlight

Hawker spotlight: Inspirasi Stall
Restaurants

Hawker spotlight: Inspirasi Stall

Queues form even before the stall is open for the day. After decades of serving staple Malay dishes, Inspirasi needs little introduction. Managed by second-generation hawker Rashid Bin Amat, 55 and three of his siblings, the stall’s roots can be traced back to 1970 when Amat’s late father first arrived from Indonesia and came up with Inspirasi’s recipes to make a living. “Back in the day, we used to sell satay as well,” Amat recalls. But after some experimentation, the family decided to focus on four signature items: mee soto, mee rubus, soto ayam and chicken porridge. For what it lacks in variety, it makes up for in quality. “Having fewer items on the menu gives me enough time to cook each dish with the attention it needs,” he explains. “It ensures that everything is packed with as much flavour as possible.” Order yourself a messy bowl of mee rubus ($2.50) and dig into yellow noodles that are cooked just right doused in a rich yet well-balanced gravy. Sweet potatoes, tau cheo and ikan billis are the heroes of the dish. For something a little lighter, opt for the mee soto. The chicken stock is boiled for hours in a cauldron so you don’t have to worry it being too watery. And though the mee rubus and mee soto ($2.50) are the perennial crowd pleasers, don’t miss the soto ayam ($2.50). Nasi impit and tender pieces of shredded chicken are doused in the same sweet and savoury turmeric-spiced broth to make for a hearty meal. The portions here aren’t all that generous but for the

Hawker spotlight: Yunos & Family
Restaurants

Hawker spotlight: Yunos & Family

Out at 724 Ang Mo Kio Market & Food Centre, a humble stall bears the name ‘Yunos & Family’ and this holds a lot of meaning, and history to the people behind the business. The Yunos family are a well-oiled unit. Each morning begins with 28-year old Afiq Rezza prepping and cooking for the day, with help from his father, aunt, uncle and 81-year old grandmother. Later, his brother and two cousins report for duty before they start serving customers at 11am. Yunos & Family is a legacy left by Afiq’s late grandfather, Haji Yunos Ahmad who set up the business in 1960 at Hastings Road before they moved to Ang Mo Kio in 1979. The recipes have remained unchanged through the years and so have the crowd. “I love seeing my regular customers, even those from my grandfather’s time are still returning to eat here,” Afiq says. There are four main dishes on the menu, mee rebus ($3), mee soto ($3), gado-gado ($3.50) and satay ($0.60/stick). There is also an extensive list of meats named on the menu and here is where the magic happens – it all can be added to your order of mee rebus. While stellar on its own, having a mee rebus with beef ribs ($6) and a begedil (potato patty) elevates the dish to new levels. We warn you, it’s going to be a sloppy affair sloshing around the bowl of egg noodles in the thick savoury broth. The ribs were slow-cooked, leaving the meat to fall off the bone easily. If you’re looking to really indulge, top up the experience with an order of mutton satay. The queues at

Hawker spotlight: Old School Canteen
Restaurants

Hawker spotlight: Old School Canteen

Take a step into the Singapore of the past at Changi Village. While it isn’t some seaside shanty, these parts are definitely more carefree. Fitting the nostalgic backdrop, blasting old tunes and peppered with vintage memorabilia, Old School Canteen serves plates of nasi lemak the traditional way. What exactly is old school nasi lemak? Ross Said, 58, the owner of Old School Canteen explains that the difference lies in the ingredients. The nasi lemak we know and love is rich in flavour and comes packed with an assortment of fried things and a small dollop of smooth sambal. But back in the day, according to Ross, it was a simple dish with lightly-perfumed coconut rice, a hard boiled egg, fried ikan tamban (silver-stripe round herring) as opposed to the ikan selar kuning (yellowtail scad) you see in present-day nasi lemak and even kangkong. The highlight of the dish, he says, has to be the sambal. At Old School Canteen, the sambal stands out. Ross works alone at the stall and prepares his sambal the day before as he believes it requires “resting time” for the flavours to fully mature. The rest of the ingredients are cooked on-site early in the morning before service starts at 8.30am. There are three different types of sambal to choose from: sambal with boiled egg, cuttlefish or prawns. Unlike the smooth paste you usually get with regular nasi lemak, the sambal here is thick and chunky. Ross roughly cuts the onions to add to the sambal’s texture. It’s the perfect balance between

Hawker spotlight: 46 Holland Drive Coffee Shop
Restaurants

Hawker spotlight: 46 Holland Drive Coffee Shop

You're lucky if your neighbourhood coffee shop has a few decent stalls for a convenientmeal. But a kopitiam where everything’s good? That’s unheard of – until now. These stalls at 46 Holland Drive Coffee Shop offer a local feast worth braving the heat and long queues for. RECOMMENDED Read more hawker spotlight features here

Best restaurants in Singapore for...

Japanese
Restaurants

Japanese

Italian
Restaurants

Italian

Halal
Restaurants

Halal

Modern Singaporean
Restaurants

Modern Singaporean

Michelin-star dining
Restaurants

Michelin-star dining

Peranakan
Restaurants

Peranakan