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Photo: Keisuke TanigawaSpa Laqua

Always open: 16 best all-night, 24-hour restaurants and attractions in Tokyo

Where to find food, entertainment and things to do whatever the time in Tokyo's most popular districts

Emma Steen
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The hustle and bustle of Tokyo doesn't clock out. Whether it's the bright light of day or the quiet, flickering neon of night, there's always something to do. Many of the city's top spots don't stop at sundown. Instead, they stay lively and inviting all night long, letting you squeeze the most out of your Tokyo experience.

You can revel in the day, and if the sun sets before you're ready, no problem these places keep the fun rolling right through the night. From dance clubs to tranquil spas and gaming centres to gourmet hotspots, the city is teeming with 24-hour establishments ready to entertain, cater and satisfy. So if you're not one to let a good time be constrained by the clock, read on. These are Tokyo's best all-day, all-night venues, where the only curfew is your own energy limit.

RECOMMENDED: If you only do three things in Tokyo… as recommended by Time Out Tokyo editors

Midnight diners

  • Ramen
  • Shinjuku
  • price 1 of 4

Ramen Nagi must be doing something right. When it opened in 2004, it operated out of a rented space in a bar in Shinjuku’s Golden Gai district. Today, it has outlets in Taiwan and the Philippines, while its flagship branch is still in Shinjuku’s drinking quarter.

Key to its wild success is its incomparable broth, made by simmering over 20 varieties of small dried fish for more than half the day. The deep, complex broth is then perfectly paired with thick, curly noodles. Come here after bar-hopping in Golden Gai, or if there’s a long queue at the main restaurant, head to the nearby annex outlet, which is also open 24 hours a day.

  • Chinese
  • Roppongi
  • price 1 of 4

The expansion of this mini-chain is a boon for the city’s night owls – its six Tokyo outlets (there’s also one in Osaka) are all open 24 hours. This Roppongi branch, with its striking interior design and convenient location next to the Grand Hyatt, does a roaring trade in the wee hours, which is hardly surprising considering the abundance of nightlife options nearby.

For a rejuvenating post-clubbing feed, you’d do well to order the Peking duck, which is roasted whole in an iron pot, then cut and served at your table. While you tuck into the crispy skin, the chef will turn the bones and remaining meat into a soup and a stir-fry. It’s one duck, three ways.

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  • Shibuya
  • price 1 of 4
Sushi Zanmai
Sushi Zanmai

Few experiences can make you feel more like a genuine Tokyoite than tucking into a feast of raw fish at three in the morning. This dependable chain gets surprisingly busy with sushi fans in the middle of the night. If you’re after some serious post-nightlife nourishment, a surefire bet is the sumptuous Sushi Zanmai selection, a vast bowl of rice with 13 toppings including tuna, sea urchin and salmon roe. Get it with a side order of grilled fish and chawanmushi (a savoury egg custard dish) and it’ll keep you going till lunchtime.

  • Roppongi
  • price 1 of 4
Tsurutontan Roppongi
Tsurutontan Roppongi

This branch of hip noodle chain Tsurutontan is busiest at lunch, dinner and 5am, when club-goers sit down for a wholesome meal to close the night before straggling home, and no wonder. The chain offers an extensive variety of dishes perfect for post-dancing calories. Menu items range from the simple kitsune (fried tofu) udon and classic curry udon with slices of beef to carbonara udon that might just pass for breakfast with its toppings of egg and bacon. You can decide on the amount of noodles you want: choose one bundle for the standard serving or up to double the noodles for no extra charge.

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  • Shinjuku

While we’d never judge anyone for their dietary habits, we’re slightly surprised to learn that at half four in the morning on any day of the week, a bunch of people will be sitting in a Shinjuku restaurant tucking into all-you-can-eat barbecued meat. This spacious and mercifully well ventilated Shinjuku restaurant offers charcoal-grilled yakiniku all day and all night – there are more than 70 items to choose from including top-notch meat and bibimbap.

While we’re at peace with pre-dawn meat feasts, we’re less convinced by Gen Chan’s gendered pricing policy – women pay ¥3,480 while men pay ¥3,980. The lunch menu is simpler and cheaper, of course, with the Kalbi set meal and Skirt Steak set meal priced at a mere ¥950 and ¥850 respectively

  • Things to do
  • Shinjuku

This expansive food hall at the newly opened Tokyu Kabukicho Tower is spread over a 1,000sqm area and can cater up to 1,300 people between 6am and 5am daily. Stroll through the lantern-lit alleyway and explore the ten eateries serving an array of Japanese food, including Hiroshima-style okonomiyaki, Okinawa soba noodles, and Hamamatsu-style gyoza.

Sure, it's a little over the top, but isn't that part of the fun? From DJ booths to LED screens, plus traditional Japanese performances on Fridays, this place serves up food, fun, and a whole lot of spectacle. 

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  • Roppongi
  • price 1 of 4

Late-night dessert bars are hard to come by in a city that tends to prefer hot bowls of ramen for after-dark munchies, but Yelo is a gem for those looking to satisfy their sweet tooth after a late dinner. Tiramisu, matcha and mango milk are only a few of the basic flavours on the kakigori menu, along with more unusual combinations like avocado mascarpone and hojicha kinako (roasted green tea with soybean powder).

At first, the enormous mountain of fluffy shaved ice might look big enough for two or three people to finish, but it’s so exquisite you’ll find yourself easily demolishing the whole thing. Customise your snowy mound with toppings such as Oreo, shiratama (mochi dumplings) and extra milk sauce if you’re feeling extravagant. There are also boozy kakigori options, like the mint-chocolate-flavoured Grasshopper that comes served in a martini glass.

On Fridays and Saturdays, the shop is open from 12noon until 5am the following day. 

  • Cafés
  • Shinjuku-Sanchome
  • price 2 of 4

A 24-hour coffee shop is perhaps the perfect business model – caffeine-fuelled customers can stay up all night long ordering cup after cup, while stragglers stumbling home from a hard night’s clubbing can start the process of sobering up. If your 1am craving is for a cup of Joe rather than a midnight feast, then head to Edinburgh. Perched on the outskirts of Kabukicho, it offers as many as 20 varieties of coffee, including high-end brews such as ‘Hawaii Kona’ and ‘Royal Blend’ (a snip at ¥3,000). Servings are generous and you can squeeze two cups out of a pot, while they also have free wi-fi. 

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  • Korean
  • Akasaka
  • price 2 of 4

A well-known stop for K-pop junkies, Hyungboo attracts a seemingly constant stream of customers, who dine amid walls plastered with the photos and autographs of Korean and Japanese celebrities. If you’re not there for the stars, go for the food – the restaurant offers an overwhelming selection of Korean fare, including hotpot favourites gamjatang and budae jjigae, keranchimu (Korean-style steamed custard egg), jijim and yakiniku, as well as an excellent set menu consisting of more than a dozen different dishes.

Things to do

  • Things to do
  • Shibuya

If you find yourself roaming Tokyo's streets after dark or at the crack of dawn, Hailey'5 Cafe in Shibuya Beam stands ready to welcome you. This isn't your standard cafe. Sure, it offers you the opportunity to retreat into a private booth to lose yourself in manga or online games but it goes far beyond that.

Night owl or early bird, you can reserve a room equipped with a PC, or perhaps a private darts room for a bit of playful competition. And if you fancy a movie marathon, their mini theatre, complete with a flat-screen and superior sound system, beats the solitude of your hotel room.

And here's the sweetest part: the DIY soft-serve ice cream bar stands ready to indulge your sugar cravings, regardless of the hour. Construct your ultimate sundae, lavish it with toppings and sauces, and savour it while you enjoy your chosen activity. Starting at just ¥660 for an hour (with a one-time registration fee of ¥300), Hailey'5 Cafe is a 24-hour haven for those seeking entertainment, comfort, and a midnight (or midday) snack.

  • Health and beauty
  • Spas
  • Suidobashi

If you're yearning for a rejuvenating retreat, Spa LaQua is your oasis in Tokyo. Open 22 hours a day, this deluxe hot spring facility offers various baths, relaxation spaces, and top-notch dining options. Sink into a soothing natural spring bath under the night sky, or enjoy a blissful massage before the break of dawn.

Upon check-in, you’re provided with a set of comfy loungewear for your stay, allowing you to unwind between sessions in co-ed areas such as the new low-temperature sauna, bedrock baths, or dining spots. Alongside your bathing experience, LaQua offers a selection of beauty treatments including  Thai and massages, aromatherapy head spa treatments and Korean body scrubs. And in case that’s not enticing enough, a recent revamp introduced an outdoor cocktail lounge complete with a foot pool, offering an impressive view of Tokyo Dome City.

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  • Health and beauty
  • Spas
  • Shinjuku

This 24-hour bathhouse offers a sublime respite from the surrounding chaos of Shinjuku. Indoor and open-air baths filled daily with mineral-rich water from Izu, and a variety of wellness services ensure you leave feeling invigorated and refreshed, no matter the hour.

If you don’t fancy getting your hair wet, try a unique Japanese sauna experience in one of the stone rooms. The ganbanyoku stone saunas are set between 40°C and 50°C. Depending on what type of stone you’re lying on, benefits are said to range from improved metabolism to better blood circulation. It’s hard to vouch how effective one session will beat improving your overall well-being, but at the very least your muscles will become less tense from the heating effects of the stones beneath you.

  • Attractions
  • Shibuya

A saving grace for fans of indoor recreation, EST Shibuya is a playground of ping pong tables, billiards and bowling alleys. There are four floors reserved for bowling alleys alone, where if you’re hungry you can order a snack from the touch panels available at every lane. Games start at ¥550 plus ¥350 for shoe rental.

If knocking down pins isn’t your thing, you can test your hand-eye coordination at the arcade on the first floor. There are a number of claw machines, plus photo booths that give you the chance to take home some memorabilia from your spontaneous all-nighter.

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  • Hotels
  • Shinjuku

Book and Bed can be credited with kicking off Japan’s ‘book hotel’ mini-boom, and has also replicated its concept in Osaka's Shinsaibashi neighbourhood. More than simply ‘sleeping with books’, as is the concept at other book hotels, Book and Bed’s niche is almost like ‘sleeping as a book’: one-person sleeping compartments are built into the bookshelves, with the upper tiers accessed via a ladder.

Book and Bed’s owners stress that their accommodation is geared more towards a night of blissful sleep brought about by bedtime reading, rather than by comfort, but it makes for a memorable one-night experience before staying elsewhere for the rest of your trip. It’s also possible to simply hang out in the spacious lounge during the day, flipping through the library of over 2,500 titles curated by hipster-friendly bookstore Shibuya Publishing & Booksellers (though Book and Bed is billed as an ‘accommodation bookstore’, these aren’t for sale). Day use starts at just ¥700 per hour and you can extend for however long you wish to stay.

This Shinjuku location also houses a café offering coffee, tea, juice and soda for just ¥200. If you're hungry, you can make it a set by adding a sandwich.

  • Things to do
  • Shinjuku
Oslo Batting Centre
Oslo Batting Centre

Open from 10am to 4am daily, this fully-automated baseball batting practice facility offers an effective way to unwind in the heart of Kabukicho. A floodlit hive of activity every evening (you can hear the ceaseless smack of bats on balls from afar), here ¥1,000 gets you a session comprising between one and three games (dependent upon the pitching speed you select).

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  • Shopping

Affectionately known as Donki, this labyrinth-like store is a staple of Japanese life. Open 24/7, Don Quijote in Shibuya offers an astonishing range of products, from bizarre novelties and tasty snacks to high-end electronics and beauty products. Donki is a quintessential Tokyo experience that you must add to your nighttime exploration.

More nighttime fun

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