Worldwide icon-chevron-right Where can you travel right now? Here are all the countries that have reopened
A beach in Thailand
Photograph: Wallpaperflare

Where can you travel right now? Here are all the countries that have reopened

Want to know where you can go on holiday? These are all the countries that have already reopened their borders – plus all those planning to soon

By Huw Oliver
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Thankfully for weary, housebound globetrotters, countries around the world are now in the ‘de-escalation’ phase of lockdown. That means shops and restaurants are reopening, internal travel is getting up and running again, and politicians are reopening borders – and in doing so, rebooting their struggling tourism industries.

But when exactly will we be able to travel again? Well – for quite a lot of us – right now in fact. Governments across the world may still be advising their citizens to stay put, but many countries are already opening up in an effort draw visitors over the summer.

Nations across the Mediterranean were among the first to welcome tourists again in May and early June, while destinations across the Caribbean and Asia have also confirmed they will reopen borders, lift travel restrictions and allow commercial flights to resume at fuller service through July and August. In other words: we’re thrilled to say that sun-splashed getaway may well be on the cards this summer.

Want to know where you can travel and go on holiday right now? Here’s the lowdown on all the countries that have already reopened – and all those are that are planning to soon.

Remember, many countries are still warning against all non-essential travel and some are quarantining all overseas arrivals, including their own returning citizens. Check all the relevant restrictions before you think about travelling.

Where can you travel right now?

Velebit mountain, Croatia, Zavizan
Velebit mountain, Croatia, Zavizan
Photograph: scimmery

Croatia

When did it reopen? May 9

Who’s allowed in? All arrivals except those from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Kosovo and North Macedonia, who are now subject to a 14-day self-isolation period.

FYI: Travellers should fill out this form and provide an accommodation booking on arrival.

8 Lisbon and Porto: Sintra
8 Lisbon and Porto: Sintra
Photograph: Shutterstock

Portugal

When did it reopen? May 22

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from EU and Schengen travel zone countries (except Italy). The UK and Portugal are yet to agree an ‘air bridge’ or ‘travel corridor’ arrangement.

FYI: Visitors to the Azores must bring a negative test result from within the past 72 hours, or take a test and wait 48 hours in self-isolation. Same goes for Madeira, but test results take 12 hours.

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siem reap
siem reap
Photograph: Shutterstock

Cambodia

When did it reopen? Late May

Who’s allowed in? There are no restrictions on where you can travel from. However, as of June 11, all travellers will have to pay a $3,000 (£2,420, A$4,340) deposit that covers a mandatory Covid-19 test ($165, to be deducted from the total) and any other treatment costs incurred while on holiday.

FYI: The government has published a comprehensive list of other fees and treatment costs visitors may incur. It should be noted that if just one person on a flight tests positive, all other passengers will have to quarantine for 14 days at a cost of $1,280 (£1,030, A$1,850) per head.

Views over Vilnius (with hot air balloons) in Lithuania
Views over Vilnius (with hot air balloons) in Lithuania
Photograph: Shutterstock

Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

When did they reopen? June 1

Who’s allowed in? All three countries have officially opened their borders to EU and Schengen-area nations, as well as the UK. However, tourists coming from countries with high transmission rates will be asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

FYI: The list of nationalities not subject to quarantine will be revised weekly, and will change depending on which countries have 15 or fewer citizens per 100,000 inhabitants infected.

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Cyprus
Cyprus
Photograph: Shutterstock

Cyprus

When did it reopen? June 1

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from two sets of countries. Set A includes: Austria, Australia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, New Zealand, Norway, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, and Switzerland. Set B includes: Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Bulgaria, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania and Spain. Travellers from Set B must provide a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival.

FYI: The Cypriot government is reevaluating the two lists on a weekly basis.

US Virgin Islands
US Virgin Islands
Photograph: Shutterstock

US Virgin Islands

When did it reopen? June 1

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: The US territory is still under an official ‘state of emergency’ until July 11. 

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Ischia, Campania
Ischia, Campania
Photograph: Shutterstock

Italy

When did it reopen? June 3

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from EU countries, the UK and the Schengen travel zone. From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and 11 other countries outside Europe are also allowed in.

FYI: The EU is revising its list of ‘safe’ countries on a weekly basis.

Gros Piton in St Lucia
Gros Piton in St Lucia
Photograph: Shutterstock

St. Lucia and Antigua

When did they reopen? June 4

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: You must present a negative test result from within 48 hours of arrival. Authorities will also be conducting spot temperature checks on arrival.

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Zanzibar
Zanzibar
Photograph: Shutterstock

Zanzibar

When did it open? June 6

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: The Tanzanian island says all visitors will be screened on arrival and those who display symptoms will be transferred to an ‘isolation centre’. You must also hold valid health insurance.

 

A harbour in Turkey
A harbour in Turkey
Photograph: Shutterstock

Turkey

When did it reopen? June 10

Who’s allowed in? The country has reopened the majority of its borders. It is restarting international flights gradually through June and July – including to and from the UK, the USA, Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates, Germany, Austria, Greece, Albania, Belarus, Jordan, Morocco, Latvia, Ireland, Slovakia and Belgium.

FYI: The country says more flight routes will reopen through the summer.

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Gdansk harbour
Gdansk harbour
Photograph: Shutterstock

Poland

When did it reopen? June 13

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from EU countries and the four European Free Trade Association nations (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland) that are part of Europe’s passport-free Schengen area. From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and 11 other countries outside Europe are also allowed in.

FYI: Europe is revising its list of ‘safe’ countries on a rolling weekly basis.

Shah-i-Zinda in Samarkand
Shah-i-Zinda in Samarkand
Photograph: Shutterstock

Uzbekistan

When did it reopen? June 14

Who’s allowed in? For the moment, only visitors from China, Japan, South Korea and Israel will be admitted freely. Travellers from ‘mid risk’ countries (including EU member states and the UK) will face a 14-day self-isolation period on arrival, while visitors from ‘high risk’ countries including Turkey, Iran and Russia will be quarantined by the authorities.

FYI: The country’s government says that if travellers catch Covid-19 during their trip, they will receive $3,000 (£2,400, A$4,400) in compensation. The sum is equivalent to the cost of care travellers would receive in the country should they test positive.

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Red Beach
Red Beach
Photograph: Shutterstock

Greece

When did it reopen? June 15

Who’s allowed in? Residents of EU and Schengen member states (except Sweden), plus 14 other countries around the world, can now get into the country. Although the Greek government had said it would restart UK flights from June 15, it has since rowed back on that pledge and extended a ban on British travellers until at least July 15.

FYI: As part of a new ‘spot check’ testing system introduced today, all visitors must fill out a ‘passenger locator form’ at least 48 hours before arrival. They will then receive a QR code to be scanned at the airport. Depending on their code, screening personnel will then direct visitors either to the exit or to a testing area. Should you test positive, you will be quarantined under supervision for two weeks, in a hotel paid for by the government.

Provence France
Provence France
Photograph: Shutterstock/prochasson frederic

France

When did it reopen? June 15

Who’s allowed in? Residents and citizens of EU member states or countries that fall in the free-movement Schengen area. Travellers from the UK are subject to a voluntary 14-day self-isolation period. From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and 11 other countries outside Europe are also allowed in.

FYI: Europe is revising its list of ‘safe’ countries on a rolling weekly basis.

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JAMAICA
JAMAICA
Photograph: Shutterstock

Jamaica

When did it reopen? June 15

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: Visitors will be asked to have their temperature checked on arrival. They should also fill out this form before departure.

A view over a coastal road in Iceland
A view over a coastal road in Iceland
Photograph: Shutterstock

Iceland

When did it reopen? June 15

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from the EU, UK and Schengen travel area. From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and 11 other countries outside Europe are also allowed in.

FYI: You can avoid a two-week quarantine by being tested at the airport when you touch down. From July 1, the tests cost 15,000ÍSK each (around £90, $113 or A$163).

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Amsterdam canal houses
Amsterdam canal houses
Photograph: Shutterstock

The Netherlands

When did it reopen? June 15

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from 30 countries within the EU and Schengen area. Sweden is excluded, and visitors from the UK aren’t allowed in either. From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and 11 other countries outside Europe are also allowed in.

FYI: All visitors must show a valid reservation when they arrive, and the authorities say you could be turned away if you have no pre-booked accommodation.

Frigiliana, a village in Andalucia, Spain
Frigiliana, a village in Andalucia, Spain
Photograph: Botond Horvath / Shutterstock.com

Spain

When did it reopen? June 22

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from EU and Schengen member countries (and the UK too). From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and 11 other countries outside Europe are also allowed in.

FYI: Visitors will face no mandatory quarantine, but will have to go through three ‘health checkpoints’: an information form, a temperature check and a visual inspection.

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Tunisia
Tunisia
Photograph: Shutterstock

Tunisia

When did it reopen? June 27

Who’s allowed in? The country has split international arrivals into a two-tier colour-coded system. Those travelling from nations on the ‘green list’ simply have to fill out an online form and can freely enter the country. This includes Australia, Austria, China, Cyprus, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain and Switzerland. Those coming from countries on the ‘orange list’, where transmission rates are higher, must present a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival. This includes Canada, Cuba, Czech Republic, Hungary, Iran, Morocco, Poland, Portugal and the UK. Travellers from countries not on either list are currently banned.

FYI: The lists are updated on a weekly rolling basis.

Bahamas
Bahamas
Photograph: Shutterstock

The Bahamas

When did it reopen? July 1

Who’s allowed in? Those with private yachts and planes have been able to travel to the Bahamas since June 15. All other travellers are allowed in from July.

FYI: Visitors must fill out an ‘electronic health visa’ before they arrive and provide a negative test result from within ten days of arrival.

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Isla Saona, eitw
Isla Saona, eitw
Photograph: Shutterstock

Dominican Republic

When did it reopen? July 1

Who’s allowed in? The country says it has reopened its ‘land, air and sea borders’ to all travellers.

FYI: Flights in and out are still limited and only 40 to 50 percent of hotels are welcoming guests.

Valletta street
Valletta street
Photograph: Shutterstock

Malta

When did it reopen? July 1

Who’s allowed in? Only residents of the the following 21 countries will be admitted: Germany, Austria, Italy, France, Poland, Cyprus, Switzerland, Iceland, Slovakia, Norway, Denmark, Hungary, Finland, Ireland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Luxembourg, Czech Republic, Greece, Croatia.

FYI: From July 15, the government said it would lift all restrictions on flights into the country – meaning all travellers should be allowed in from that date.

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Egypt coastal resorts
Egypt coastal resorts
Photograph: Shutterstock

Egypt

When did it reopen? July 1

Who’s allowed in? The country’s government has not clarified whether it will allow only certain nationalities in, but EgyptAir is to resume flights to and from countries including the UK, the USA, the Netherlands, Germany, Turkey, Italy, the UAE and Canada. All passengers will have to self-isolate in accommodation for 14 days.

FYI: Only resort areas and associated airports in southern Sinai and Red Sea province have reopened.

Stonehole Bay Beach, Bermuda
Stonehole Bay Beach, Bermuda
Photograph: Courtesy Bermuda Tourism Authority

Bermuda

When did it reopen? July 1

Who’s allowed in? The British overseas territory has reopened to all international air travel.

FYI: Visitors are required to show a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival, and you should bring appropriate health insurance.

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A beach in Thailand
A beach in Thailand
Photograph: Wallpaperflare

Thailand

When did it reopen? July 1

Who’s allowed in? Foreigners with work permits, residency or families in Thailand. People seeking certain types of medical treatment may also be allowed in, as will those travelling from Japan, South Korea, Singapore, China and Hong Kong for business.

FYI: All new arrivals will be subject to a 14-day quarantine.

Where can you go on holiday later this month?

Dubai Landscape
Dubai Landscape
Photograph: Imthiyas Khan, Shutterstock

Dubai

When is it reopening? July 7

Who’s allowed in? There aren’t any restrictions on where you can travel from. However, all international visitors must present a recent negative test result (from within four days of arrival), or undergo testing at the airport.

 

Barbados
Barbados
Photograph: Shutterstock

Barbados

When is it reopening? July 12

Who’s allowed in? All travellers. Note that you’ll have to present a negative test result – or get tested – on arrival. Those travelling from ‘high-risk’ countries including the United States should bring a test result from within the past 72 hours; those from less affected countries, from within the past week. If you don’t bring a test result, you’ll have to pay $150 for a test on arrival (and self-isolate for 14 days while awaiting the results).

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French Polynesia
French Polynesia
Photograph: Shutterstock

French Polynesia

When is it reopening? July 15

Who’s allowed in? Only visitors from Europe and the USA. When you arrive, the government says you must provide a complete itinerary – including inter-island transport plans and accommodation details. 

Maldives
Maldives
Photograph: Shutterstock

The Maldives

When is it reopening? July 15

Who’s allowed in? All travellers can enter without restrictions. However, a confirmed booking is required prior to travel and travellers should only stay at one resort or hotel during their visit. Visitors will receive a free visa on arrival and be subject to thermal screening.

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Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
Photograph: Shutterstock

Puerto Rico

When is it reopening? July 15

Who’s allowed in? All travellers. Temperature checks and tests will be carried out at the airport on arrival, and some passengers may be asked to self-isolate for 14 days, regardless of symptoms.

Turks and Caicos
Turks and Caicos
Photograph: Shutterstock

Turks and Caicos

When is it reopening? July 22

Who’s allowed in? All travellers. Airlines across Europe and North America have confirmed they will restart routes to the British overseas territory by that date.

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Tbilisi, Georgia
Tbilisi, Georgia
Photograph: Shutterstock

Georgia

When is it reopening? July 31

Who’s allowed in? The government claims it will welcome all international tourists. However, there will be set ‘zones’ travellers have to stick to, and land border crossings are still being negotiated.

Where can you go on holiday in August?

Colombo, Sri Lanka
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Photo: Shutterstock

Sri Lanka

When is it reopening? August 1

Who’s allowed in? All travellers. Note, however, that you will be required to carry a health certificate issued either by your home government or a reputed health agency stating that you have been declared virus-free in the past 72 hours.

Costa Rica's Cloud Forest
Costa Rica's Cloud Forest
Photograph: Shutterstock

Costa Rica

When is it reopening? August 1

Who’s allowed in? When Costa Rica’s borders reopen, only travellers from certain countries will be allowed in. The list of ‘safe’ nations hasn’t been confirmed just yet but is expected to include Canada, countries in the European Union and the UK. There will be no quarantine for new arrivals, though travellers should expect temperature checks.

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WAIKIKI, HAWAII
WAIKIKI, HAWAII
Photograph: Theodore Trimmer / Shutterstock.com

Hawaii

When is it reopening? August 1

Who’s allowed in? All travellers. However, if. you want to avoid a 14-day quarantine, you’ll have to provide a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival. All visitors will still be subject to a health inspection and temperature check on arrival.

Cuba
Cuba
Photograph: Shutterstock

Cuba

When is it reopening? Late August

Who’s allowed in? The government hasn’t specified whether it will only admit certain nationalities. It has, however, confirmed that only all-inclusive resorts on Cuba’s outlying islands including Cayo Coco, Cayo Guillermo, Cayo Santa María and Cayo Largo del Sur will have reopened. Havana and the rest of the country’s mainland towns and cities will be off-limits to holidaymakers.

Where can you go on holiday in September?

BALI, INDONESIA
BALI, INDONESIA
Photograph: Shutterstock

Bali

When will it reopen? September

Who’s allowed in? The country hasn’t announced any restrictions on where you can travel from. The governor of Bali, I Wayan Koster, has simply said that, depending on the status of outbreaks, he hoped domestic tourism would return by August and that international visitors would be admitted from September.

Which countries aren’t reopening until 2021?

CAPE TOWN
CAPE TOWN
Photograph: Shutterstock

South Africa

When will it reopen? During a government briefing on May 27, the country’s Department of Tourism said it didn’t expect international tourism would return at all until February 2021. In the meantime, industry groups in the country are lobbying the government for an earlier reopening this September.

Who’s allowed in? It’s too early to say.

Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge at sunset
Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge at sunset
Photograph: Shutterstock

Australia

When will it reopen? The country’s tourism minister has said its international borders will remain sealed until the end of 2020, and perhaps longer.

Who’s allowed in? It’s too early to say. However, discussions are under way to set up a trans-Tasman ‘travel bubble’ between Australia and New Zealand that would allow mutual travel between the two nations.

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Sri Lanka
Photograph: Shutterstock

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