Things to do for Valentine's Day in New York

Screw the dinner date and try one of these fun things to do for Valentine's Day

Illustration: Heiko Windisch
You know what's not sexy? Leaving your Valentine's Day plans to the last minute. Whether you are a fan of the holiday or not, we've compiled a list of the best parties, shows and things to do for Valentine's Day—with some anti–V-Day shennanigans thrown in for good measure. And since February 14 falls on a Friday this year, expect plenty of parties on the weekend.

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Most popular things to do for Valentine's Day

"Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs"

Critics' pick

The explanatory text on the wall at the beginning of MoMA’s blockbuster of around one hundred of Henri Matisse’s cut-outs notes that these well-known works attempted to resolve the “eternal conflict of drawing and color.” Epic though that reconciliation may have been, it feels faraway and quaint these days. Despite his immense popularity, Matisse’s emphasis on formal innovation and aesthetic pleasure may make him the modern master most alien to the dry, over-intellectualized “conceptual” maneuvers that fill so many New York galleries. Thus, this rather glorious exhibition feels tonic. Matisse first took scissors to paper in the 1930s to work out figural compositions for murals and theater curtains, representing dancers with schematic forms alternately sinuous and angular, and counterintuitively achieving a remarkable feeling of movement and gravity with ostensibly unwieldy materials. During World War II, he used the technique to create the great artist book Jazz (1947). The book’s circus theme, bright hues, and delightfully recognizable flat shapes evoke picture books for children, masking its suggestions of wartime violence: Starbursts in red and yellow on and around bodies evoke open wounds and exploding shells. The 20 maquettes, all of which are on view, appear wonderfully handmade compared to the final stenciled pages, a fact noted by the artist himself, which led him to consider the possibilities of the cut-outs as independent works of art. During the decade before his d

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Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Midtown East Until Tuesday February 10 2015

Cabaret

Critics' pick

[Note on this review: Emma Stone has replaced Michelle WIlliams as would-be femme fatale Sally Bowles (through Feb 15), and is terrific in the part.] Cabaret. Studio 54 (see Broadway). Book by Joe Masteroff. Music by John Kander. Lyrics by Fred Ebb. Directed Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall. With Alan Cumming, Michelle Williams. Running time: 2hrs 30mins. One intermission. Cabaret: In brief A decade after closing their hit revival of the Kander and Ebb classic, the Roundabout and director Sam Mendes reopen the Weimar-era Kit Kat Klub. Alan Cumming reprises his sinister-slinky turn as the Emcee and Michelle Williams plays nightclub crooner Sally Bowles. Linda Emond, Bill Heck and Danny Burstein costar. Cabaret: Theater review by Adam Feldman Cabaret is on Broadway again: Willkommen home, you magnificent beast. Originally staged in 1966, then brought to a sordid cinematic life in Bob Fosse’s (heavily adapted) 1972 film, the Kander and Ebb classic was revived and reconfigured anew in Roundabout Theatre Company’s triumphant 1998 account. Now that version has returned with its original star: the supreme Alan Cumming as the Emcee of the Kit Kat Klub, a decadent nightclub in Berlin’s Weimar period. Why so soon? A better question might be: Why not? This Cabaret is a superb production of one of the great Broadway musicals of all time—an exhilarating, harrowing masterpiece. In Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall’s staging, Cumming is the corroded soul of the show; he haunts it and intrudes on it,

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Studio 54, Midtown West Until Sunday March 29 2015

Constellations

Critics' pick

Constellations. Samuel J. Friedman Theatre (see Broadway). By Nick Payne. Directed by Michael Longhurst. With Jake Gyllenhaal, Ruth Wilson. Running time: 1hr 5mins. No intermission. Constellations: In brief Jake Gyllenhaal, who proved his stage chops in 2012's If There Is I Haven't Found It Yet, reteams with that play's author, Nick Payne, for a U.S. premiere. Gyllenhaal plays a beekeeper who meets a quantum theorist (The Affair's Ruth Wilson), and their romance unfolds in a dazzling series of what-if scenarios. Constellations: Theater review by Adam Feldman Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson are the stars of Constellations, and as that implies, they must make themselves multiple. Inspired by quantum mechanics, Nick Payne’s captivating play, directed crisply by Michael Longhurst, explores the idea of parallel universes in a mosaic of scenes that often restart and branch off in new directions, skipping forward and backward in time. “Every decision you’ve ever and never made” creates a different reality, and the play shows us fragments of some of them. It puts narrative in a house of infinite shattered mirrors. Beekeeper Roland (Gyllenhaal) and cosmologist Marianne (Wilson) are on-again, off-again lovers: in some worlds on, in some worlds off. Their relationship and its challenges—infidelity, illness, death—vary in ways that sometimes reflect nuances of their behavior and sometimes stem from forces beyond their control (which may not be such different things). Informed by author

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Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, Midtown West Until Sunday March 15 2015

"El Greco in New York"

Critics' pick

Romantics and Modernists alike treasured the old master El Greco (1541–1614) for the skewed perspectives and strangely distorted figures that fill his paintings—that is, when they weren’t blaming those aesthetic quirks on drugs, madness, or astigmatism. For the 400th anniversary of his death, three New York institutions have gathered their substantial holdings of the painter’s works—at 19 paintings, more than anywhere outside of the Prado in Madrid!—in two concise exhibitions. While “El Greco at the Frick Collection” comprises three canvases, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “El Greco in New York” features contributions from the Hispanic Society of America, as well as its own collection. The larger Met show allows us to trace the artist’s trajectory. Born Domenikos Theotokopoulos in Crete, then a Venetian possession, El Greco painted Byzantine icons before leaving to study in Italy. The early Christ Healing the Blind, ca. 1570, a fairly typical late-Renaissance religious scene, shows the influence of his artistic training in Venice in its impressive if imperfect approximation of the modes of artists such as Veronese. In 1577, El Greco moved permanently to Spain. Subsequent devotional pictures show the artist’s increasing mastery of Renaissance idiom. Christ Carrying the Cross, ca. 1580–85 (watery-eyed, but with a perfect manicure), and The Holy Family, ca. 1585 (the Madonna charming, with an up-do and a gauzy mantilla; the nursing baby Jesus beady-eyed, with an oddly shaped h

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

Nutcracker Rouge

Critics' pick

[Note: The review below is from a previous run of Nutcracker Rouge. The revived production is at XIV, Company XIV's new home in the East Village, and the current cast does not include Marisol Cabrera and Jeff Takacs.) Nutcracker Rouge. Minetta Lane Theatre (see Off Broadway). Directed and choreographed by Austin McCormick. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr 50mins. One intermission. Nutcracker Rouge: In brief Austin McCormick and his risqué neobaroque dance theater Company XIV present a lavish erotic reimagining of a classic holiday tale (adapted by Jeff Takacs), complete with circus performers, operatic singers and partial nudity. Nutcracker Rouge: Theater review by David Cote Around this time of year, the word nutcracker conjures so much innocent wonder: Tchaikovsky’s beloved score, the dance of the sugarplum fairy, glitter pasties, stripper poles, comically large stuffed penises.… Oh, did I lose you there? Director-choreographer Austin McCormick has taken the Christmas staple and given it a NSFW spin. Nutcracker Rouge is the perfect hot date: a rated-R riff on the tale of Clara and an enchanted appliance—which may require batteries. Our wide-eyed heroine is now an adult named Marie Claire (Laura Careless, agog and breathing heavily), and the world she discovers is a wintry realm of half-naked dancers and acrobats, gyrating and performing physical stunts that send her into ecstasies of arousal. They get the audience riled up, too. Decked out in Zane Pihlstrom’s eye-po

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XIV, East Village Until Saturday January 31 2015

Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park Rink

Critics' pick

Bryant Park’s 17,000-square-foot outdoor rink is free and open late. Don’t get too excited—the admission may be gratis, but you’ll have to shell out $19 to rent skates (or BYO). Still, it’s a veritable winter wonderland: After your time on the ice, warm up at spacious rinkside restaurant Celsius. If you want to practice your lutzes and axels with ample spinning room, try visiting during off-peak hours. Through Mar 1. RECOMMENDED: More rinks for ice skating in NYC

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Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park, Midtown West Until Sunday March 1 2015 Free

A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder

Critics' pick

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Walter Kerr Theatre (see Broadway). Book and lyrics by Robert L. Freedman. Music and lyrics by Steven Lutvak. Directed by Darko Tresnjak. With Jefferson Mays, Bryce Pinkham, Lauren Worsham, Lisa O’Hare. Running time: 2hrs 20mins. One intermission. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder: in brief The mercurial Jefferson Mays (Tony winner for I Am My Own Wife) plays multiple members of an aristocratic clan in this new musical by Steven Lutvak and Robert L. Freedman, based on the same novel that inspired Kind Hearts and Coronets. A distant and disinherited member of the D'Ysquith family slays his way to the earldom. Darko Tresnjak directs. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder: review by David Cote Since it turns on the niceties of aristocratic succession, why not start the coronation early: A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder is the new undisputed king of musical comedy. Filled with lunatic sight gags and the wittiest, loveliest show tunes in years, there’s not a weak link in the lively cast, and Darko Tresnjak’s antic, cartoonish staging is ideal. But without a doubt, the jewel in GGLM’s crown is an eight-faceted gem: Jefferson Mays as a gargoylish gallery of doomed twits, snobs and prigs, members of the seriously inbred and outré D’Ysquith clan. These various scions and heirs must fall so that distantly related and mostly disinherited Monty Navarro (Pinkham) can rise. Mays is a bloody comic genius (with an ace backstage costume crew

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Walter Kerr Theatre, Midtown West Until Thursday December 31 2015

Honeymoon in Vegas

Critics' pick

Honeymoon in Vegas. Nederlander Theatre (see Broadway). Book by Andrew Bergman. Music and lyrics by Jason Robert Brown. Directed by Gary Griffin. With Rob McClure, Brynn O’Malley, Tony Danza. Running time: 2hrs 30mins. One intermission. Honeymoon in Vegas: In brief Rebounding from the sadly short run of his Bridges of Madison County, composer-lyricist Jason Robert Brown is back with a bouncy and bright musical adaptation of the 1992 movie comedy. Rob McClure, Brynn O’Malley and Tony Danza star, alongside several Elvis impersonators. Honeymoon in Vegas: Theater review by David Cote How to answer snobs who denounce Broadway as a cultural wasteland of gaudy lights, musical cheese and tacky titillation, a place where suckers from around the world flock to get fleeced? You could say at least it’s not…Las Vegas? Well, the Great White Way has now become Sodom of the Southwest, and whatever happens there is definitely not staying there: Honeymoon in Vegas is too damn fun to keep secret. Jason Robert Brown’s big and brassy score borrows gleefully from the obvious sources—Sinatra, Mancini and Liberace—and splices that swingin’ lounge vibe with his own bouncy, wryly neurotic voice. For those who loved and mourned The Bridges of Madison County last season, they know Brown as a serious composer-lyricist who writes keenly about passion and loneliness. So it’s a thrill to see his musical craft and depth in the service of so much splendid silliness. Because let’s face it: Andrew Bergman’s bo

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Nederlander Theatre, Midtown West Until Thursday December 31 2015

Sam Falls, "Light Over Time"

Critics' pick

A process-oriented Los Angeles artist who works in a variety of media, Sam Falls has transformed Downtown Brooklyn’s MetroTech Commons into a playground for his interactive art. Exploring the passage of time through light and color, Falls displays several sculptural works that are activated by the viewer and will physically alter over time. His Untitled (Thermochromic bench), for example, changes color due to heat generated by sitters or the intensity of sunlight. A maze has been painted with multicolored layers of powder-coated aluminum; one side has protective UV coating while the other doesn’t, so that the piece will partially fade from exposure. But as it does, another layer of paint will eventually emerge and regenerate the original color. A set of teeter-totters feature geometric forms that collect rainwater, thus changing the distribution of weight. A giant wind chime is too big for an ordinary breeze to move it, so visitors do the job instead by pushing the chimes around. A more solitary experience is provided by a pair of white, aluminum shelters with tiny entrances and stained-glass skylights. The ambience within each of these “light rooms,” as the artist calls them, will change with the weather. Playful and thought-provoking, these laboratories of fun seek to engage the curious child inside all of us.—Paul Laster

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Public Art Fund at MetroTech Center Commons, Downtown Until Friday May 29 2015 Free

The Woodsman

Critics' pick

Even before writer, codirector, set- and puppet-designer star James Ortiz asks the audience to “imagine” in a brief prologue, we’ve already been thrust into a dark corner of Oz, where gnarled branches loom and unsettling noises signal danger. Strangemen & Co.’s immersive and practically wordless adaptation of the writings of L. Frank Baum uses low-tech stagecraft like evocative Bunraku puppets (the wicked witch is chilling), haunting vocal sound effects and a lone violinist to tell the backstory of Dorothy’s cherished Tin Man (Ortiz), once a mortal axman who sacrificed an arm and a leg and a whole lot more in the name of love. Emotions are communicated through simple gestures, grunts and glances, not one wasted. Touching on mortality, futility and fate, The Woodsman is a grown-up fairy tale that proves happiness is a worthwhile goal, even if it doesn’t last ever after.—Theater review by Raven Snook The Woodsman. 59E59 (see Off Broadway). By James Ortiz. Based on the writings of L. Frank Baum. Directed by Ortiz and Claire Karpen. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr. No intermission.

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59E59 Theaters, Midtown East Until Sunday February 22 2015

"Judith Scott—Bound and Unbound"

Critics' pick

The artist Judith Scott (1943–2005), born deaf and with Down syndrome, was the author of a body of extraordinary abstract fiber sculptures, which she made during the last 18 years of her life. Some 60 of Scott’s pieces are being shown at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and in Scott’s case, the choice of venue is as important as the work itself. Scott usually began with one or more found objects—an electric fan, a picture frame, a bundle of sticks—that she’d then wrap in yarn, string, fabric strips and other materials such as candy wrappers and plastic tubing. The final, cocoonlike forms are often organic and crystalline at once, with bulges resulting from successive layers of padding, and faceted effects produced by the line of knots that Scott used when changing colors or joining one part to another. Forms might be open or closed. One creation, executed mostly in shades of turquoise, sports a series of exuberant, intersecting loops. Another is a gray-green ovoid with blues and pinks streaking one side. Her color sense was sophisticated and grew more so over time—most notably in a late work featuring a tangle of bluish-white plastic hose bound together with yarn dyed blue, orange, olive, lime and ocher. Scott’s art is original, powerful and consistent. It evolved over the course of her life and is of its own time. This show positions Scott and her oeuvre in the context of the feminist movement, and by doing so, has far-reaching implications

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Brooklyn Museum, Prospect Heights Until Sunday March 29 2015

Comedy at the Knitting Factory

Critics' pick

The smooth and delightfully understated Hannibal Buress—who fans will recognize as Broad City's Lincoln—introduces fellow stand-ups.

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Knitting Factory, Williamsburg Until Sunday December 27 2015 Free

Whiplash

Critics' pick

This wildly popular show is known for its surprise special guests—comics like Chris Rock, David Cross and others have appeared.

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Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Chelsea Tuesday January 27 2015 - Tuesday December 29 2015 Free

Kenny Rivero, "I Can Love You Better"

Critics' pick

Garbage accumulates like repressed urges in Kenny Rivero’s show “I Can Love You Better,” where paintings with assemblage elements are installed alongside sculptures made from discarded debris. The former blends collage, Surrealism and folk art into cartoonish compositions, while the latter piles shards of glass, bits of broken records and scraps of paint into quasi-shamanistic objects. In both, art history is treated like a trash can to be picked through. Rivero, a Yale MFA graduate, grew up on the mean streets of Washington Heights in the 1980s, and memories of life there provide a theater where psychologically charged narratives play out. In three large paintings, It Happened on the Corner, El Pique and The Fire Next Time (all from 2014), confrontations, beatings and fires dissipate into pictorial snippets. Sidewalks are transformed into sacrificial altars, slabs on which figures are dismembered. But Rivero also employs a comic touch that blunts the impact of his images. He mixes body parts, architectural fragments, letters and numbers to create a playful confusion, complicating our relationship to urban brutality. Evocations of violence within the aesthetic realm are nothing new; they informed the figurative mutations of early modern art. But Rivero understands that actual assault isn’t symbolic or a mere transgression of someone’s space: It can leave wounds that are mortal. Rivero links the shedding of blood on the pavement to the smearing of paint on canvas and in doing

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Shin Gallery, Lower East Side Until Saturday February 28 2015 Free

A Beautiful Day in November on the Banks of the Greatest of the Great Lakes

Critics' pick

A Beautiful Day in November on the Banks of the Greatest of the Great Lakes. New York City Center Stage II (see Off Broadway). By Kate Benson. Directed by Lee Sunday Evans. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr 20mins. No intermission. A Beautiful Day in November on the Banks of the Greatest of the Great Lakes: In brief Kate Benson's high-concept play treats a Midwestern Thanksgiving dinner as a spectator sport, complete with announcers. Lee Sunday Evans directs for New Georges, which mounted a smaller production of the show last year. A Beautiful Day in November on the Banks of the Greatest of the Great Lakes: Theater review by Helen Shaw It’s a canny bit of programming to bring the surreal Kate Benson comedy A Beautiful Day in November on the Banks of the Greatest of the Great Lakes uptown. Last year it did nicely at the downtown New Georges festival, but now it’s arrived, further polished, in front of postholiday audiences, ones primed to see family functions as ritualistic and eerie. Short, darkly funny and distinctly unsweet, A Beautiful Day… follows the doings of the Wembly family on Thanksgiving. Sisters jockey for position as turkeys are turned, yams are plated and the black sheep (Kristine Haruna Lee) undergoes the traditional humiliation. Benson lacquers this familiar banality with formal devices: Sports commentators (hilarious Ben Williams and Hubert Point-Du Jour) offer a sly play-by-play from their booth, and the gorgeously multiethnic cast moves like Robert Wils

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New York City Center Stage II, Midtown West Until Saturday February 7 2015

Drunk Shakespeare

An actor drinks heavily (in the vein of Comedy Central's Drunk History) and then tries to corral others into enacting a story by the Bard. Bibulous excess is encouraged.

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Roy Arias Stages, Midtown West Until Thursday December 31 2015

2nd Whimsical Winter Wonder...Exhibition

Critics' pick

Enjoy this park exhibit featuring 14 artists' interpretations of winter through paintings, sculptures, photography and other creative mediums.

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Poe Park, Fordham Until Saturday January 31 2015 Free

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Critics' pick

Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Belasco Theatre (see Broadway). Book by John Cameron Mitchell. Music and lyrics by Stephen Trask. Directed by Michael Mayer. With Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Hall. Running time: 1hr 40mins. No intermission. Hedwig and the Angry Inch: In brief The omnitalented Neil Patrick Harris plays the titular crotch-botched German rock singer in the first Broadway production of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask's genre-bending 1998 rock musical. Michael Mayer (Spring Awakening) directs. Hedwig and the Angry Inch: Review by David Cote Transitioning from child star to adult gay icon, sitcom prince and social-media wizard, Neil Patrick Harris always seemed to be a cultural rock star. But in his latest reinvention, it turns out that the actor is, y’know, an actual rock star. As the imperious, spurned, fright-bewigged, sweaty glitterbomb at the heart of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Harris makes Broadway rock harder than it ever has before. It’s tough to tell who’s the vehicle here—Hedwig or Harris? Is the celebrity using John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s quintessential millennial hit to reboot an East Coast profile, or do the producers of prickly material need star wattage to sell its harsh, sticky truths about desire and damage? Let’s opt for symbiosis, one of the major obsessions of this magnificent monster: Harris and Hedwig are one. In fact, its essential drama is derived from the splitting of one being into two, per Plato’s Symposium. In the ancient Gr

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Belasco Theatre, Midtown West Until Saturday March 14 2015

"The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter"

Critics' pick

Temperatures climb to a balmy 80 degrees in the 1,200-square-foot vivarium, returning for its 16th year. The 500 specimens flying around include monarchs, zebra longwings and iridescent blue morpho butterflies.

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American Museum of Natural History, Upper West Side Until Monday May 25 2015

Sugarcube

The winter pop-up art venue has free live music, film screenings, dance parties and craft workshops all month. Enjoy a weekly happy hour (Fri 16), screenings of films like Little Fugitive (Thu 15), art workshops such as Euphoria Records Presents: Paint the Music (Sat 17) and musical performances including Sun Ra Arkestra (Jan 31).

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South Street Seaport, Financial District Until Sunday February 1 2015 Free

Wael Shawky, Cabaret Crusades

Critics' pick

Marionettes are the tool of choice for this Egyptian artist, who, since 2010, been working on a video trilogy recounting the history of the Crusades as seen through Arab eyes. The first two installments depicted events from 1096 to 1145 (the period of the first and second Crusades) as puppet pageantry, and they're joined here by the debut of final segment, completing a saga that takes a literal look at how the strings of history are pulled.

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MoMA PS1 , Long Island City Saturday January 31 2015 - Monday August 31 2015

"Fetching Blemish"

Critics' pick

Following modern art's proud tradition of making the beastly beautiful, this show offers a top-notch roster of contemporary artists, whose works—portraits mostly—make references to defects, deformities, blemishes and just plain old butt-ugliness. Wolfgang, Nicole Eisenman and Amy Sedaris (!) are among the contributors.

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Invisible-Exports, Chinatown & Little Italy Until Saturday February 14 2015 Free

Frantic!

Critics' pick

The Stand's free weekly show, hosted by Aaron Berg, presents a rotating lineup of the club's regulars each Monday.

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The Stand, Gramercy & Flatiron Until Monday December 28 2015 Free

Mike Nelson, Gang of Seven

Critics' pick

Ambitious installations underpinned by narrative conceits are the stock-in-trade of this British artist, a two-time short-lister for the Turner Prize who was also Britain's representative at the 2011 Venice Biennale. His mix of storytelling and elaborately crafted interior settings owe more than a small debt to the work Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, though he adds a bit of dour British stoicism to their dour Russian resignation. His current installation consists of assemblages created out of driftwood and washed-up detritus; in Nelson's backstory, they were collected along the shores of British Columbia by a fictional beachcomber who imagines the ocean as an inchoate yet sentient being.

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303 Gallery, Chelsea Until Saturday February 21 2015 Free

The River

Critics' pick

The River. Circle in the Square (see Broadway). By Jez Butterworth. Directed by Ian Rickson. With Hugh Jackman, Cush Jumbo, Laura Donnelly. Running time: 1hr 25mins. No intermission. The River: In brief Hugh Jackman may not be singing and dancing, but we still can't wait to see his new gig on Broadway. The charismatic Aussie stars in a mysterious new piece by Jez Butterworth (Jerusalem) about a fisherman in a remote cabin and the two women (Cush Jumbo, Laura Donnelly) he entertains there. Ian Rickson directs. The River: Theater review by David Cote Jez Butterworth’s elliptical chamber drama is a mystery play in the purest sense: no answers, no closure. As Hugh Jackman (identified only as the Man) interacts with Cush Jumbo (the Woman) and Laura Donnelly (the Other Woman), you may worry over the gals’ well-being: Is Jackman playing a serial womanizer—or something more sinister? Next moment, your heart goes out to the lonely guy, connected more to the stream outside his cabin than his appealing houseguests. Then there’s the fact that the ladies switch places midscene with the Man, making the action seem both continuous and fractured. Crime thriller? Erotic memoir? Ghost story? Yes and no. Wriggling slickly through all these categories, The River is a metaphysical piece, despite visceral business (the Man guts and cooks a trout). The language often grows heightened, with aria-like monologues about water, fish, the weather and furious lovemaking (“It was beyond hunger, beyond need

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Circle in the Square , Midtown West Until Sunday February 8 2015

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