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The best steakhouses in Las Vegas

Looking for a knock-your-socks-off steakhouse? Las Vegas is where it’s at with plenty of fine-dining for Wagyu worshippers.

Photograph: Courtesy Delmonico Steakhouse

While the Las Vegas dining scene has evolved far beyond the steakhouse clichés—the best restaurants in Las Vegas today range from Thai to French—the city still boasts some of the best meateries in the country. If you’re looking for a great steakhouse, Las Vegas definitely has your back, and then some. The city is one of the few places where you can actually dine on certified Japanese A5 Kobe, so highly prized that each shipment arrives with a certificate of authenticity bearing the animal’s nose print. Even if you’re not willing to shell out $50-plus per ounce at a high-end restaurant on the Strip, there’s a richly marbled cut with your name on it somewhere, along with seafood towers, mouth-watering sides and desserts so decadent you can’t help but indulge. So whether you’re craving a bit of beef after seeing one of the best Las Vegas shows, or somewhere to kick off your Vegas bachelor party (or bachelorette party), these are the Las Vegas steakhouses you want to be hitting.

RECOMMENDED: See full list of the best restaurants in Las Vegas

Best steakhouses in Las Vegas

1

Bazaar Meat by José Andrés

Don’t call it a steakhouse. According to superstar chef José Andrés, this Philippe Starck–designed restaurant at SLS is a “meathouse,” dedicated to celebrating the bounty of the earth, be it in the form of A5 Kobe straight from Japan, Finnish caviar, or even leeks with charred chipotle sauce. The ingredients—sourced so carefully the R&D team tried more than 500 cuts of meat before opening—are the stars here, but the chefs still have fun showing them off. That means foie gras is offered wrapped in cotton candy and dishes like the classic steak tartare are mixed tableside with plenty of panache. Don’t skip the suckling pig, imported from Spain and served by the quarter. You’ve never had such succulent swine.

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2

Carnevino

The name says it all. Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich’s Italian-influenced steakhouse is about two things: crazy good beef and crazy good wine. The wine list leans heavily on Italy, and the menu offers handmade pastas and various crudos, all leading up to some serious meat. The beef is sourced from American farmers and dry-aged off-site until it meets the restaurant’s very high standards. This can take a while—up to 90 days for cuts like the bone-in rib eye or porterhouse and up to 240 days for a special, once-secret steak called the riserva.

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3

Cut

Wolfgang Puck, the man responsible for revolutionizing Las Vegas visitors’ eating expectations (with Spago), opened this classic steakhouse in the Palazzo in 2008. Since then, Cut has demonstrated that it’s a slice above many other steak joints. For one thing, that’s practically all you find here: meat, meat and more glorious meat. Go for the 100 percent pure Japanese Wagyu if you can, but rest assured there are no bad choices here, only splendid steaks grilled over wood and charcoal and finished under a 1,200-degree broiler. Complete your meal with one of the dozen side-dish options, a topper or sauces like wasabi-yuzu kosho butter or brightly herbal chimichurri.

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4

Craftsteak

The selection of meats (grass-fed veal, lamb shank, filet mignon, braised short ribs) is impressive, but the sides and the quiet invention shown in the kitchen distinguish Tom Colicchio’s Craftsteak from more run-of-the-mill casino steakhouses. Ingredients come from small family farms and other below-the-radar sources, and you can tell, particularly when it comes to the splurgy Japanese A5 Kobe, which will set you back a cool $260 for the eight-ounce filet. It’s all served in an elegant, if slightly noisy, atmosphere.

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5

Prime

Prime indeed. In fact, one could go further: first class, superior and pre-eminent pretty much sum up Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s steakhouse, where the elegant setting comes with a perfect view of the Bellagio fountains. There’s magic on the plate, too: steaks are the highlights, but don’t overlook the parmesan-crusted chicken, seared ahi tuna or selection of seven potato-based sides. And start with the bacon-wrapped shrimp. You can thank us later.

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6

Delmonico Steakhouse

Looking for a slight twist on the typical steak and seafood eatery? We’ve got just the place for you. Emeril Lagasse’s signature Cajun spin separates Delmonico’s from the rest of the pack. Start with the New Orleans barbecue shrimp, then try the creole-seasoned New York strip steak with a side of the bacon and white cheddar grits or country smashed potatoes. Then pinch yourself just to make sure you’re not down on the bayou.

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7

SW Steakhouse

Set lakeside at Wynn, this sophisticated steakhouse is lighter and brighter than some of its boys-clubby cousins, but no less beefy. An entire section of the menu is devoted to Japanese Wagyu with cuts available from three different prefectures, but you can also stick domestic with Snake River Farms’ Wagyu or prime cuts like the bone-in New York or chili-rubbed double rib eye, a 42oz plate that’s plenty for two. Like all Wynn restaurants, SW is also vegetarian- and diet-friendly with low-calorie options alongside more decadent dishes. Good luck resisting the poblano bacon mac and cheese.

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8

Jean Georges Steakhouse

Named for chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten and, well, steak, this entry brings some contemporary, international angles and curves to the traditional steak-and-seafood joint. Starters include Dungeness crab cakes, exquisitely presented platters of oysters, and retro shrimp cocktail. The meal culminates with perhaps a Chilean sea bass with miso-yuzu glaze, organic chicken with buttery hot sauce, or—for the big eater—a 36oz porterhouse, which you can dress with JG steak sauce or soy-miso butter.

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9

Steak House

When you want an old-school night of meat and potatoes done right, head for the circus tent. The Steak House at Circus Circus has been charming diners for decades with its menu of classic fare like French onion soup, wedge salad and dry-aged beef cooked on an open-hearth mesquite charcoal broiler. Prices aren’t cheap, but your cut of cow includes soup or salad, daily vegetables and your choice of garlic mashed potatoes, a baked spud or wild rice.

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