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Camden Arts Centre

  • Art
  • Finchley Road
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Recommended
  1. © Camden Arts Centre
    © Camden Arts Centre
  2. Tal R exhibition at Camden Arts Centre, 2008. © Camden Arts Centre
    Tal R exhibition at Camden Arts Centre, 2008. © Camden Arts Centre
  3. Camden Arts Centre: garden and café. © Camden Arts Centre
    Camden Arts Centre: garden and café. © Camden Arts Centre
  4. Bomb damage during the Blitz: © Camden Arts Centre
    Bomb damage during the Blitz: © Camden Arts Centre
  5. Camden Arts Centre: garden. © Camden Arts Centre
    Camden Arts Centre: garden. © Camden Arts Centre
  6. Mike Nelson installation at Camden Arts Centre (1998, recreated 2010). © Camden Arts Centre
    Mike Nelson installation at Camden Arts Centre (1998, recreated 2010). © Camden Arts Centre
  7. Ruth Ewan installation at Camden Arts Centre, 2015. © Camden Arts Centre
    Ruth Ewan installation at Camden Arts Centre, 2015. © Camden Arts Centre
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Time Out Says

5 out of 5 stars

Way up on Finchley Road, Camden Arts Centre has been quietly ploughing its own artistic furrow since 1965 (it was Hampstead Central Library before that). It used to provide arts and crafts classes to the local community; now it’s north London’s go-to for contemporary art by the likes of Haroon Mirza, Eva Hesse and Doris Salcedo. Camden also boasts a great bookshop, a lovely garden and an ace café.

Details

Address:
Arkwright Road
London
NW3 6DG
Transport:
Tube: Finchley Road/Hampstead
Opening hours:
Tue, Thu-Sun 10am-6pm; Wed 10am-9pm
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What's On

Allison Katz: Artery review

  • 4 out of 5 stars

Allison Katz is in relentless pursuit of what she calls ‘genuine ambiguity’. Not that fake stuff you get off dodgy websites, but the pure, uncut, good shit: top grade ambiguity. So the Canadian artist’s paintings are - as you can guess - pretty ungraspable things, filled with symbols and concepts that mean multiple things, that signify contrasting ideas. They are, in other words, ambiguous AF.  The show opens with a painting of the inside of a lift. The perspective draws you in towards its gleaming silver surfaces, ready to usher you to the floor of your choosing. It’s the perfect start; a lift is the ultimate ‘liminal’ space, a constant in-between, a space that’s never permanently one thing or another, it’s always changing. Chickens show up a lot in this show, and eggs too, lots of eggs. Both hard and fragile, caught between conception and hatching, the egg is, again, an ambiguous object. One room here is made up of paintings seen from the inside of a mouth, the teeth and lips acting as a framing device for visions of a woman sat on a floor (a self-portrait), a cat, a room of paintings and another chicken, Behind each work is a painting of a cabbage. It’s an incessant clash of the super weird with the super mundane. Other works here depict a naked man in a field of bulls, or a car seen from the inside of another car. And you start to realise that everything is linked. The symbols here all repeat, you can draw lines between the works. All this chaos is connected. I don't thin

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