Evren Tekinoktay: Ulalume

Art Free
4 out of 5 stars
 (Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist)
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Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist
 (Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist)
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Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist
 (Evren Tekinoktay: 'Bazooka', © the artist, courtesy The Approach)
3/6
Evren Tekinoktay: 'Bazooka', © the artist, courtesy The Approach
 (Evren Tekinoktay: 'Closet', © the artist, courtesy The Approach)
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Evren Tekinoktay: 'Closet', © the artist, courtesy The Approach
 (Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist)
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Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist
 (Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist)
6/6
Evren Tekinoktay: 'Ulalume', installation view at The Approach. © the artist

Panties, burgers and car tyres are all part of the visual vocabulary of this Danish artist who apparently keeps Prince as her muse (in her mind…) while crafting collages that mix magazine images, sketches, paper cutouts and painting. There are two kinds of work on show here: the first is a series of entrancing neon light reliefs with spinning candyfloss-coloured geometric shapes that would easily jolly up the lobby of an LA bowling alley in 1983 (in the best possible way). Then there are three films, marking Teinoktay’s first foray into animating her very weird universe, a collection of images drawn from deeply sinister and kitsch wells: glamour shots from fashion mags, porno and a general hodgepodge of obscurely cropped arms, legs, mouths and geometric shapes.

The standout film, ‘Closet’, shows the giant face of a transgender/transvestite model posed seductively before the camera, except that her eyes have been cut out and through the holes you glimpse a slowly rolling collage – featuring more of those panties – all to mesmerising effect, aided by the analogue sounds of the background creaking as it rolls on by. Playful and idiosyncratic, there are strong feminist undertones here about how media images resonate, and this sparse show has a cumulatively entrancing effect that leaves you wondering: what would Prince think?

Ananda Pellerin

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