Rodin, Brancusi, Moore: Through the Sculptor’s Lens

Art, Photography Free
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Henry Moore, 'Mother and Child', 1956
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Constantin Brancusi, 'Mlle Pogany II', 1920
 (Eugène Druet, 'Burghers of Calais' by Rodin)
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Eugène Druet, 'Burghers of Calais' by RodinEugène Druet, 'Burghers of Calais' by Rodin
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Henry Moore, 'Draped Seated Figure against Wall', 1957
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Constantin Brancusi, 'Le Poisson', 1924
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Pierre Choumoff, 'Le main de dieu' by Rodin
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© Rodin
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Constantin Brancusi, 'Endless Column in Voulangis', 1926-27
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Eugène Druet, 'Balzac' by Rodin
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Constantin Brancusi, 'L'oiseau D'Or', 1919

Over 50 photographs documenting the renowned artists' studio practices

Photography played an important part in the practices of these three great sculptors capturing works that are now lost, destroyed or were never realised. Auguste Rodin employed a number of photographers as a means to not only publicise his work but also to study his work in progress. Constantin Brancusi considered an image of his work far superior to any written analysis, thus allowing his work to speak through photography. Henry Moore’s photos that form an extensive catalogue of his productive career have rarely been exhibited and here offer an insight to his preparatory process. 

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