Dr Johnson's House

Attractions, Historic buildings and sites Smithfield
  • 4 out of 5 stars
(10user reviews)
27 Love It
Save it
Dr Johnson's House
Dr Johnson's House
Samuel Johnson’s home from 1748-1759 and the place where he compiled the first comprehensive English dictionary houses collections of pictures and period furniture.

Posted:

Venue name: Dr Johnson's House
Contact:
Address: 17 Gough Square
London
EC4A 3DE
Opening hours: £4.50, £3.50 concs (over 60, student or registered unemployed), £1.50 children (age 5-17), £10 family, under-fives free
Transport: Tube: Chancery Lane
Do you own this business?
To improve this listing email: feedback@timeout.com

You may be interested in:

Average User Rating

4.4 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:7
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:3
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|10
2 people listening
GeorgeX
Tastemaker

Samuel Johnson is the one that created the first English dictionary. A small museum about him and at the same time one of the finest examples of domestic houses in the 17th Century. 5 storey house, with a lot of factsheets to read further and a replica of the original dictionary. The most famous London quote; "When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life" was actually written by him.

Hadrian B

A venue dedicated to knowledge as well as beauty. Not only Johnson's is preserved in the house, but traces of Boswell (unavoidably), Reynolds, Garrick, and all the dictionary's men. Marvelously enjoyable.

Hadrian B

A venue dedicated to knowledge as well as beauty. Not only Johnson's is preserved in the house, but traces of Boswell (unavoidably), Reynolds, Garrick, and all the dictionary's men. Marvelously enjoyable.

Nicholas C

This where Johnson wrote his famous Dictionary which was published in 1755. The house also hosts lectures and it is well worth a visit.

Nick Y

An utterly charming old town-house located in the heart of the City; of London's many small museums, this is one of the best.

Guille L

Tucked away in the City. Step back in time and see, hear and feel how London was in the 18th century. Anyone that speaks English would appreciate the genious of Samuel Johnson

Laura I

Exceptional example of late 17th-century architecture thoughtfully presented to the public. A wealth of information on words and Georgian London with an exciting programme of events and a remarkably welcoming and intelligent Curator

Jonnyboy
tastemaker

Tucked away in a little square in the City of London, Gough Street to be exact, is a 5 storey 17th Century House owned by Dr Johnson. He is best known for creating the first comprehensive English dictionary that we would all recognise and use today.

When he died, all his belongings were sold so this is very much a celebration of the space he lived and worked in, but it is still a very interesting example of a domestic house from that time.

It has stood the test of time, having been completely rebuild following the Great Fire of London, 350 years ago to miraculously only having its roof blown off in WW2. Many of the other buildings in the vacuity date from the 1950's or even the 90's, so 17 Gough Street really is something to celebrate.

Open Mon-Sat, with a small entrance fee on the door

Bonnie W
Tastemaker

A well laid out and informative little museum. There are sheets to read in each room giving you further information about the rooms themselves as well as the many portraits lining the walls. This is definitely not a grand house, but that's to be expected as Samuel Johnson was not a very wealthy man. The highlight for me was the library where there was a replica of Johnson's dictionary to flip through as well as a first edition behind glass.