Charles Dickens Museum

Museums Holborn
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 (© Andrea Artz)
© Andrea Artz
 (© Peter Dazeley)
© Peter Dazeley
 (© Andrea Artz)
© Andrea Artz

A glimpse of Victorian London in the home of one of England's greatest authors.

The museum, library and headquarters of the Dickens Fellowship – and the house where Dickens lived from 1837-39 – allows visitors a glimpse of how the writer worked and indeed how people's lived in Victorian London. A mixture of reconstructed rooms and gallery space, the museum features original Victorian furniture and fittings, refurbished attics and kitchens and an education centre at 49 Doughty Street. Visitors are taken back in time as they explore and discover Dickens's life through displays of his personal belongings, paintings and his writing. The museum runs regular events such as costumed tours and candlelit late-openings.

Read about our favourite seven exhibits at the Charles Dickens Museum


Venue name: Charles Dickens Museum
Address: 48 & 49 Doughty St
Opening hours: Tue-Sun 10am-5pm (last adm 4pm)
Transport: Tube: Russell Sq
Price: £9; £6 concs, £4 children (6-16)
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The Charles Dickens Museum, situated in 48 Doughty Street, Bloomsbury, offers a fascinating insight inside the official London family residence of Charles Dickens, wife Catherine (nee Hogarth) and children between 1837-1839. Here, the public view original manuscripts and artifacts of Dickens, making up just over 100,000 items, and have the chance to take a walk inside the family dining salon which was used by Charles and Catherine to entertain literary luminaries including William Makepeace Thackeray. The private desk is kept where Dickens wrote classics including The Pickwick Papers and Oliver Twist. Situated over three floors, there are servant quarters, a children's attic and a first class cafeteria overlooking a courtyard, where visitors can rest after their tour.

The current exhibition 'Restless Shadow' runs until 29th October 2017, and discusses the impact of Dickens as the social crusader for justice through campaigning. Drawing from his own personal tragedy of a family divided by the workhouse, the exhibition touches on his quest to help other affected by homelessness and workhouses.


A insightful escape into Victorian home life as much as the life and influences of Dickens. Allow about half an hour to 45mins - don't forget to go downstairs to the basement to see the kitchen and scullery. And enjoy a cup of tea in a garden age afterwards.

I found it to be a very rustic and display the era in which Charles dickens lived. I would highly recommend to take a visit to the Charles dickens museum while your in London.