‘Fatherland’ review

Theatre, Drama
Recommended
4 out of 5 stars
4 out of 5 stars
(2user reviews)
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1/10
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2/10
© Tristram Kenton Declan Bennett (Scott) 
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3/10
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4/10
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5/10
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6/10
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7/10
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8/10
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9/10
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10/10
© Tristram Kenton

A messy, moving look at father-son relationships

Grown men will cry - and boys will thank fuck they didn't grow up in the '70s, on watching this fractured but epiphanic crucible of a play by Simon Stephens, Karl Hyde and Scott Graham.

They're a motley and impressive creative trio. Stephen's a fine modern playwright; Hyde the Underworld a musician who soundtracked ‘Trainspotting’ along with most of his generation's drug experiences; Graham a leader of physical theatre troupe Frantic Assembly. For this show they essentially did a pre-Brexit roadtrip to the towns they escaped from as teenagers, interviewed lots of blokes about their dads, and made a verbatim play out of it.

The result is exactly what you'd expect: heart racing music; heartrending human interest stories - and a slightly irritating chaser of post-alcoholic middle class southern guilt. But there are unforgettable moments: such as when the men (all men! so many men!) invade the stage and the auditorium waving huge flags, chanting complex choral stuff about their memories of their absent dads, like a Freudian football nightmare. Go! this is stunning, messy and authentic.

Average User Rating

3.5 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:1
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:1
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|2
2 people listening

Beautiful show! Affecting, funny, and leaves you, whoever you are, thinking about your own father figures. Dynamic, inventive with amazing lighting and design. Catch it while you can.

tastemaker

Let me start by saying I LOVE Frantic Assembly, their last show had me in an emotional ball of tears and joy. I wanted to love this show, but I just didn't. It was difficult to connect with the characters as there was so much chopping and changing between stories and the singing was, at times, out of tune. They used verbatim material to make a show about using verbatim material, it felt like nothing was really done with it, except retell the stories, sometimes dropping in the odd movement sequence. I wanted so much more physical theatre, there were endless possibilities as to how this show could be really great with the material they collected.