Worldwide icon-chevron-right Europe icon-chevron-right United Kingdom icon-chevron-right England icon-chevron-right London icon-chevron-right L'apres-midi d'un Foehn review

L'apres-midi d'un Foehn review

Summerhall

'L'apre-midi d'un Foehn'
Jean-Luc Beaujault 'L'apre-midi d'un Foehn'
By Daisy Bowie-Sell |
Advertising

 

Fans of film 'American Beauty' will be able to understand some of the strange appeal of this show. No, it's not about a father played by Kevin Spacey who goes through a mid-life crisis and almost has an affair with his daughter's friend. It's about plastic bags.

For the people who haven't seen Sam Mendes's Oscar-winning movie, there's a moment where we're shown a home video of a bag floating in the wind. It dances and sways almost as if it's alive. That is exactly what happens in this piece from Company Non Nova, just with more bags.

There are seven fans arranged in a circle and a heavy jacketed, winter hat-wearing man (director and choreographer Phia Menard) sits in the circle and looks at us sombrely before turning his attention to a small red plastic bag on the floor in front of him. He makes some little cuts, sticks some extra plastic bits onto the bag, crumples it up and leaves it in the circle before switching the fans on.

It's extraordinary the grace and beauty which emerges from something which is usually seen as either a plague on the planet or your weekly shopping-aid. The bags look like little people as they dance to a beautiful Debussy soundtrack. More and more are thrown into the circle by the strange, silent magician figure and the movements change: the bags swirl and waltz together as you watch, most-likely slack-jawed.

At times it's often difficult to believe the bags aren't remote controlled. They move in time with the music, lifting and falling as the score does. But this is a completely improvised performance which has just been cleverly prepared.

And that's it. Twenty five minutes of dancing plastic bags: a little burst of surprise, which would only be found somewhere like the Edinburgh fringe festival. 

 

A picture of the Time Out Magazine

Missing Time Out magazine?

You can still read our latest issue from the comfort of your couch

Read online

The latest Edinburgh Fringe theatre reviews

Theatre, Fringe

KlangHaus review

4 out of 5 stars

So it turns out that the greatest gig venue in the world is the former small animal hospital at the hulking medical school-turned-arts megalopolis that is Summerhall…

Read the review

Advertising
Theatre, Drama

Our Teacher's a Troll review

3 out of 5 stars

Not content with unsettling us adults with his dark TV show ‘Utopia’, he’s decided to redress the balance and see how much the kids can take. Kelly’s sublimely naughty RSC adaptation of ‘Matilda’ showed how he understood that kids tend to love the grotesque aspects of a character.

Read the review

Advertising
Theatre, Drama

The Future For Beginners review

3 out of 5 stars

It's rare to hear an opera about a question as mundane as who has just answered the phone, or how it was going in your data planning job. But Liveartshow’s ‘The Future for Beginners’ doesn’t care about your preconceptions, or any of the usual opera rules.

Read the review

Advertising
Theatre, Fringe

Hiraeth review

4 out of 5 stars

A combination of single-minded intent, outsider art naivety and sheer funniness all serve to lend lo-fi comedy 'Hiraeth' a sense of total freshness.

Read the review

Advertising
Show more

Recommended

    You may also like

      Advertising