Witches and Wicked Bodies

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 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)
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© The Trustees of the British MuseumThe Witches’ Rout (The Carcass). A Witch riding skeleton, c.1520, Agostino Veneziano
 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)
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© The Trustees of the British MuseumWitchcraft scene, three nude figures in a darkened interior, including figure at right holding a recumbent skeleton by the shoulders, and a female figure at left with left hand holding an open book and right a bone above a flame. c.1780, Inscribed: 'Goya.' attributed to Luis Paret y Alcazar
 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)
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© The Trustees of the British MuseumThe Siren Vase, Pottery: red-figured stamnos. The ship of Odysseus passing the Sirens. C 480BC-470BC Attributed to The Siren Painter
 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)
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© The Trustees of the British MuseumThey spin finely (Hilan Delgado), Los Caprichos, plate 43, 1799, Francisco de Goya y Lucientes
 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)
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© The Trustees of the British MuseumThe Three Weird Sisters from Macbeth, 1785, John Raphael Smith, after Henry Fuseli
 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)
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© The Trustees of the British MuseumA Witch Riding on a Dragon, 1643-1671, Jan de Bisschop

Time Out says

Explore art's opinion of the witch through this collection of drawing and etchings from the last 500 years.

The British Museum have brought together their most darkly magical exhibits (and borrowed a few from the V&A, Tate Britain, British Library and the Ashmolean in Oxford) for this collection representing the portrayal of the witch and witchcraft in art over the last 500 years. Prints and drawings depicting devils, beasts and broomsticks chart the witch's progression from possessed monster to exotic sirens, and several classical Greek vases will be included to highlight our longstanding fascination with the subject.

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This exhibition was utter rubbish - save your trip to the museum  and just buy the book - far better value if you bear in mind that the art on show has little to do with witches and more to do with the imagination of the artists portrayed. The exhibition is so bad it's not worth a star rating, but one has to be given to be able to post a review...