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Guinness, St. Patrick's Day
Photograph: Daniel Krieger

The 10 best Irish pubs in NYC

Everywhere to sip a perfect pint and take a DIY whiskey flight.

Amber Sutherland-Namako
Written by
Amber Sutherland-Namako
&
Bao Ong
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A New York City Irish pub will never let you down. Some are among the best bars in the city, while others are closer to dive bars. Some also happen to run great restaurants, and others, well, are frankly just there. Still, they all at least aim to pour a perfect pint and might even have some extra whiskey varieties, too. These are the best places to raise a glass to sláinte in NYC. 

RECOMMENDED: See the full St. Patrick's Day in NYC guide

Best Irish pubs in NYC

  • Bars
  • Beer bars
  • East Village
  • price 1 of 4

The classic champion of the genre, McSorley’s Old Ale House is the rare tourist destination that also draws locals. Its effortless charm is irresistible. Cross the sawdust-covered floor in a space that dates back to the 1850s and join a heavy wood table for light or dark ale. Though the libations are famously limited to those two brews, McSorley’s has expanded its food menu in the last 168 years to include corned beef hash, burgers and sandwiches. 

  • Bars
  • Cocktail bars
  • Financial District
  • price 2 of 4

A much more recent addition to NYC’s Irish pub landscape, The Dead Rabbit has won oodles of awards since it opened in 2013. Its cozy, cluttered, crowded ground floor is lined with bar seats and tables between banquettes and low stools. There’s a similarly appointed and slightly more comfortable (the chairs have backs) parlor upstairs. The cocktails are serious in both spaces, and the Guinness is an art form. 

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An Béal Bocht
  • Bars
  • Pubs
  • The Bronx
  • price 1 of 4

Gaelic for "the poor mouth" (also the title of a Flann O'Brien novel), An Béal Bocht is a gathering place for Irish-American art and theater communities. Illustrations depict literary heroes like James Joyce. Comfort foods abound on the lengthy menu, which stars bangers and mash and a classic shepherd’s pie and beef stew.

  • Bars
  • Beer bars
  • Noho
  • price 1 of 4

The beer here is vast and varied: You’ll find a dozen on tap and two dozen bottles, many of them imported, to sip at long wooden communal tables. Swift also offers more than 30 single malts and plenty of whiskey from the Emerald Isle. The bar’s been known to host traditional Irish bands on Tuesday evenings.

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  • Bars
  • Pubs
  • Chelsea
  • price 1 of 4

​​This family-owned saloon, which first opened at its present location in 1936, is among the city’s oldest. It’s also appeared on classic NYC shows like Seinfeld and Law & Order. Sidle up to the oak bar for a few shots and chase ‘em with the house’s own McManus Ale. And if you want some privacy, simply slip into one of the old-school telephone booths

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  • Bars
  • Sports Bars
  • Kips Bay
  • price 1 of 4

It’s music first at Paddy Reilly’s, which also has eight taps, made specifically for the pub by Guinness. Many of its design elements were also sourced from the Emerald Isle. Its knotted floorboard was once underfoot at an Irish hotel, and the makeshift still was constructed in County Cavan. Come by on a night when there’s a live band scheduled for the maximum effect. 

  • Bars
  • Pubs
  • Bay Ridge
  • price 2 of 4

Elements of Ireland are all throughout The Wicked Monk. Wood, stained glass and even a confessional were all shipped from a late 1800s-era Gothic Irish monastery. The beer, of course, is a lot fresher, and the lovely spot also serves lengthy brunch, lunch and dinner menus. 

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  • Bars
  • Sports Bars
  • West Village
  • price 1 of 4

A self-declared “haven for Irish expats and West Village locals,” the Four-Faced Liar’s warm lights, tin ceilings and tufted banquettes create a lazy pub atmosphere. Friendly barkeeps dispense 20-ounce drafts of Guinness and pour cocktails from the full bar. 

Molly’s Pub and Shebeen
  • Bars
  • Beer bars
  • Gramercy
  • price 1 of 4

Pastoral touches—a whitewashed facade, a sawdust-covered floor and Celtic crosses—make this tavern feel like it's been transplanted from the Irish countryside. Regulars swear by the Irish lamb stew paired with a pint of Murphy's Stout, a creamy swig brewed in County Cork using a 150-year-old recipe.

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