Get us in your inbox

Search

First look at this summer’s new art installation on the Met rooftop

Written by
Howard Halle
Advertising

Kyle Dorosz

It’s April, which means daffodils are in bloom, along with The Metropolitan Museum of Art's roofop, which has just sprouted the latest of its annually commissioned outdoor art projects. This year’s edition—titled The Theater of Disappearance—comes courtesy of Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas, who’s laid out a literal banquet of surreal sculptures. Each piece is put together with facsimiles of objects (or fragments thereof) held in The Met’s vast, encyclopedic collection. 

Kyle Dorosz

Made up of dozens of such items, each of these mostly figurative ensembles contains such odd juxtapositions as the lid of a Medieval Knight’s tomb paired with a Northwest Indian Tribal mask, and a Polynesian totem plunked next a 19th-century sculpture of a Native American woman. To realize the installation, the museum used a 3D scanner to digitally map objects selected from the collection by the artist. They were then spliced together using computer software before being cast into a series of seamless sculptures divided between freestanding statues in black and banquet-hall–table tableaux in white. You can enjoy them or their own, or do a scavenger hunt through the museum for the actual objects used in their creation.

Kyle Dorosz

The Theater of Disappearance is up until late fall, and as usual, The Met’s rooftop bar is open for business during that time. So grab a drink and check out the installation and its dramatic Central Park/Midtown backdrop.

Kyle Dorosz

Kyle Dorosz

Kyle Dorosz

Kyle Dorosz

Popular on Time Out

    Latest news

      Advertising

      The best things in life are free.

      Get our free newsletter – it’s great.

      Loading animation
      Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another?

      🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

      Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!