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New York Film Festival 2019

Here’s everything you need to know about New York Film Festival 2019, including screenings, reviews and ticket info

The Irishman
Photo: Niko Tavernise/NetflixThe Irishman

Easily one of the best things to do in the fall, the New York Film Festival stretches back to 1963, when it established a mission of bringing the best work from around the world to Lincoln Center. Excitement is already feverish for this year’s 57th edition, thanks to the announcement of the opening-night film, The Irishman, Martin Scorsese’s return to the gangster epic starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel and Joe Pesci. An annual treat that shows off the city's cinematic good taste in a classy way, the New York Film Festival hosts many fantastic movie screenings and events that you won’t want to miss.

When is New York Film Festival 2019?

The festival runs from Friday, September 27, to Sunday, October 13.

Where is New York Film Festival 2019?

The festival’s main venue is Lincoln Center’s swanky Alice Tully Hall, located at 1941 Broadway (between 65th and 66th Sts). All main slate titles have an initial screening there, with subsequent screenings at various Lincoln Center venues, including the Walter Reade Theater (165 W 65th St) and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (144 W 65th St).

How do I get tickets?

Buy tickets at the official festival website.

New York Film Festival 2019

The 10 best movies to see at the 2019 New York Film Festival
Movies

The 10 best movies to see at the 2019 New York Film Festival

The city’s premiere annual event for film fanatics, NYFF, is about to begin. Here are the truly unmissable titles.

New York Film Festival will open with Martin Scorsese's The Irishman in fall 2019
News

New York Film Festival will open with Martin Scorsese's The Irishman in fall 2019

It's a programming coup that ranks with the fest's 2014 world premiere of David Fincher's Gone Girl

New York Film Festival 2018

The 10 best movies to see at the 2018 New York Film Festival
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The 10 best movies to see at the 2018 New York Film Festival

From the riches of the annual showcase, we pick ten bangers, filled with punk perversity and global empathy alike

New York Film Festival 2017

The 10 best movies to see at the 2017 New York Film Festival
Movies

The 10 best movies to see at the 2017 New York Film Festival

Catch the cream of this year’s edition—heartbreaking indies and foreign sensations—before awards season heats up

The official lineup for the New York Film Festival is here!
News

The official lineup for the New York Film Festival is here!

Nothing turns our eye more to the serious fall movies than announcement of the New York Film Festival's "main slate"

New York Film Festival 2016

The 10 best movies to see at the 2016 New York Film Festival
Movies

The 10 best movies to see at the 2016 New York Film Festival

Here’s the official lineup for the New York Film Festival
News

Here’s the official lineup for the New York Film Festival

The opening film at this year’s New York Film Festival will make history
News

The opening film at this year’s New York Film Festival will make history

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
Movies

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars

New York Film Festival 2015

The 10 best movies at the 2015 New York Film Festival
Movies

The 10 best movies at the 2015 New York Film Festival

Arabian Nights
Movies

Arabian Nights

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Carol
Movies

Carol

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Cemetery of Splendor
Movies

Cemetery of Splendor

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars

New York Film Festival 2014

Mr. Turner
Movies

Mr. Turner

Twice before, first with Topsy-Turvy and then with Vera Drake, Mike Leigh has punctuated his bittersweet studies of contemporary life with period dramas. Now, with Mr. Turner, the British director of Naked and Secrets & Lies takes us back to the nineteenth century and the later years of the celebrated, groundbreaking, difficult painter J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851). Sad and joyful, Mr. Turner offers a wonderfully rich tapestry of experience, digging deeply into a complicated, contradictory life.Timothy Spall—a veteran of Leigh's films—plays this eccentric, determined London bohemian like a bronchial, cantankerous, randy old toad with back ache. He grunts and grimaces and gropes his way through life. He talks like a market trader after a crash course in literary classics. Leigh, meanwhile, explores Turner's life unburdened by any sense of purpose other than an intense, contagious fascination with this man, his work and, increasingly, the inevitable, slow, irresistible trudge towards death.We observe Turner's fondness for his elderly father; his sexual relationship with his meek housekeeper (Dorothy Atkinson); his rejection of his children and their mother; his arms-length acceptance by the lions of the Royal Academy; his late-life relationship with a Margate widow (Marion Bailey); and the mockery of the crowd when his work turns experimental. "Vile" and a "yellow mess" concludes Queen Victoria at an exhibition: The presence of royalty in a Mike Leigh film is just one of its many w

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
2 out of 5 stars
Goodbye to Language
Movies

Goodbye to Language

A boat sails into port. Frankenstein author Mary Shelley scratches in her composition book with a quill. The second movement of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony begins, halts abruptly, then begins again. A naked woman pontificates while her male lover takes a loud shit that would shame Austin Powers’ Fat Bastard. A dog runs into a forest, then back out. The boat leaves port. Those are some of the images and sounds you’ll experience in Jean-Luc Godard’s playful, provocative latest. After his stimulating, highly uneven Film Socialisme (2010), it’s nice to see this great filmmaker sculpting something that feels genuinely revelatory. That’s not to say that the 3-D Goodbye to Language is always an easy sit: As with much Godard after 1967’s epochal Weekend, this is a free-associative essay film that eschews straight narrative, includes a tidal wave of allusions (both visual and verbal), and unfolds over several planes of action. Impossible as it is, you have to look everywhere at once. Godard has called the film a simple one about a married woman, a single man and a dog. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re always portrayed by the same people—or even exist in the same time period. Only that scene-stealing canine (played by Godard’s pet pooch, Roxy) seems to be its own entity, a silent witness to the man and woman’s tempestuous relationship. One shot of our furry friend sleeping on a couch while an offscreen argument rages calls to mind an observation by Abbas Kiarostami (a Godard

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Two Days, One Night
Movies

Two Days, One Night

Belgium's Dardenne brothers, Jean-Pierre and Luc, make punchy, contemporary, socially aware films—simple on the surface but alive with compassion and wisdom. As filmmakers, the Dardennes are never less than reliable, yet still, Two Days, One Night feels like one of their best, up there with The Child or Rosetta in its cast-iron sense of purpose, searing relevance and understanding of how tough it is for all of us, especially the less well-off, to do the right thing in our everyday lives. It features a career-high performance from Oscar-winner Marion Cotillard—by far the Dardennes' starriest casting to date—and has a starting-gun premise: A young mother, Sandra (Cotillard), recently taking time off work for depression, is made redundant by a small factory that manufactures solar panels. In her absence, 14 of her 16 colleagues have voted to take their bonuses rather than let her keep her job. But willed into action by a supportive husband, Manu (Fabrizio Rongione), Sandra persuades her boss to give her one last chance and to host a second vote round of voting two days later. Will she be able to save her job by knocking on doors over the weekend to persuade her colleagues to support her? What follows could so easily feel repetitive or like a perfunctory tour of Belgium's working class as, one by one, we meet these 16 colleagues and their families, hovering on their doorsteps or in their homes. But in the hands of the Dardennes, the repetition—the question, "Will you vote for me?

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Birdman
Movies

Birdman

"Most of the successful people in Hollywood are failures as human beings." So said Marlon Brando. But what happens when their 15 minutes are up? It’s not like failure suddenly transforms former megacelebs into humble human beings who can pick up their own coffee from Starbucks. That's Michael Keaton’s problem in this savagely funny, strangely sweet, sad and utterly brilliant New York-set comedy from Mexican writer-director Alejandro González Iñárritu, better known for his gloomy, state-of-the world dramas Babel and 21 Grams.Keaton is Riggan Thomson, an actor who raked in the cash in the early 1990s as a lame pre-Avengers superhero in a blockbuster franchise (a clear nod to Keaton's own days as Batman). He hasn’t made a Birdman film in years—but Birdman is still part of him. Quite literally: There's a booming comic voice in his head ("You're the real deal"), and it gives him superhuman powers. Is Birdman a figment of Riggan's imagination? Is this a dig at superstar actors with inflated egos who have trouble telling the difference between real life and their movie characters? Whatever it is, Riggan has problems. He’s trying to reinvent himself for a second act as a Serious Artist, remortgaging the house in Malibu to write, direct and star in an adaptation of a Raymond Carver short story on Broadway. But Birdman is shitting on the plan, telling Riggan to make a reality-TV show instead of this "piece of shit."Birdman is hilarious simply as a film about putting on a play, shot by

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
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New York Film Festival 2013

About Time
Movies

About Time

Abuse of Weakness
Movies

Abuse of Weakness

Alan Partridge
Movies

Alan Partridge

All Is Lost
Movies

All Is Lost

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New York Film Festival 2012

Amour
Movies

Amour

Araf—Somewhere in Between
Movies

Araf—Somewhere in Between

Barbara
Movies

Barbara

The Bay
Movies

The Bay

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