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The Collaboration
Photograph: Marc Brenner/Young Vic

A new play about Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat is headed to Broadway

"The Collaboration" is set to premiere on Broadway in November.

Anna Rahmanan
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Anna Rahmanan
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Andy Warhol continues to be the perfect subject of cultural pursuits in New York and beyond.

Following a major museum survey of the artist's photos at Fotografiska this past fall and an eccentric theatrical experience inspired by his life earlier this year, Warhol will now be the focus of a new play headed to Broadway this fall. 

The Collaboration is a new stage production that explores Warhol's relationship with fellow artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, specifically dissecting the history of their 1984 joint modern art exhibit.

Following its run at the Young Vic in London earlier this year, the Anthony McCarten-written production is set to begin previws at the Manhattan Theater Club on November 29. Opening night is scheduled for December 20.

The cast that starred in the play in London will take on the same parts on this side of the Atlantic: Paul Bettany stars as the iconic Warhol opposite Jeremy Pope's Basquiat. Interestingly enough, the duo is already set to reprise their respective roles on a film adaptation of The Collaboration, which will go into production later this year.  

"New York, 1984. Fifty-six-year-old Andy Warhol’s star is falling. Jean-Michel Basquiat is the new wonder-kid taking the art world by storm. When Basquiat agrees to collaborate with Warhol on a new exhibition, it soon becomes the talk of the city," reads the official description of the play. "As everyone awaits the 'greatest exhibition in the history of modern art,' the two artists embark on a shared journey, both artistic and deeply personal, that re-draws both their worlds."

If the excitement surrounding previous Warhol-inspired exhibits and shows that opened in New York is of any indication, The Collaboration is sure to be a popular play. Whether it will prove to be an actual hit is yet to be seen.

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