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Grand Central Terminal
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City Winery is coming to Grand Central Terminal

It'll focus on its farm-to-table menu and wine selection with background music.

Shaye Weaver
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Shaye Weaver
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Every year, NYC's Grand Central Terminal becomes more of a destination than a transportation hub. These days, the iconic train station has a dining concourse, bars and restaurants like The Campbell, Cipriani Dolce, Grand Central Oyster Bar & Restaurant, a tennis court, a market with a variety of shops, and soon, it'll have a new gastropub, bar and music venue.

On Monday, the MTA Finance Committee approved a license agreement for City Winery to move into and rent a 15,888-square-foot space in Vanderbilt Hall, according to Crain's New York, which first reported the deal. And while it will have live music, it'll be "ambient, background" music with more of a focus on its "farm-to-table menu and unique selection of wine," MTA records show.

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In the MTA meeting, officials said ensemble bands would play at the new City Winery location, but that they'd keep it on the quieter side as to not compete with train announcements in the main concourse, according to Gothamist.

"It's kind of cabaret seating around a small pedestal, and we've limited the ensemble to four pieces," said MTA's Chief Real Estate Transactions and Operations Officer David Florio. "It's really intended to be ambient music, which supports a full-blown food and beverage use in the old main waiting area and then also a gastropub in the interior space."

The space itself was last occupied by the Great Northern Food Hall, which lost its lease in November 2020. After speaking with about 20 potential retailers, the MTA received a letter of intent from City Winery, according to MTA records.

City Winery, which has 12 other locations throughout the country including three in NYC, will rent the space for three years with the option to renew its lease for two years after that.

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