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Red Rooster Harlem

Restaurants, Soul and southern American Harlem
Recommended
3 out of 5 stars
Red Rooster Harlem
1/9
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz
Red Rooster Harlem
2/9
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczRed Rooster Harlem
Red Rooster Harlem
3/9
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczRed Rooster Harlem
Shrimp with dirty rice at Red Rooster Harlem
4/9
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczShrimp with dirty rice at Red Rooster Harlem
Slow-braised oxtail at Red Rooster Harlem
5/9
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczSlow-braised oxtail at Red Rooster Harlem
Donuts at Red Rooster Harlem
6/9
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczDonuts at Red Rooster Harlem
Cheddar apple pie at Red Rooster Harlem
7/9
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczCheddar apple pie at Red Rooster Harlem
Red Rooster
8/9
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz
Red Rooster Harlem
9/9
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

Time Out says

3 out of 5 stars

Friendly warning! We're working hard to be accurate. But these are unusual times, so please check that venues remain open.

At Marcus Samuelsson's Harlem bistro, global soul food takes center stage, artfully mixing Southern-fried, East African, Scandinavian and French flavors. While the former Aquavit chef, now culinary TV star, mostly sacrifices elegance in favor of mass appeal, you'll still find the occasional haute cuisine flourish. Slippery ribbons of house-smoked salmon and gravlax—“lox and lax" on the playful menu—are served with Ethiopian injera fried into chips, in a pretty ho-hum multinational dish. But a paint-splatter smear of purple mustard lends a chefly touch to the final plate.

Apart from these upmarket detours, most of the food is gregarious fun. Dirty rice topped with four plump barbecued shrimp is more international than authentically bayou, the spicy chicken-liver-enriched pilaf flecked with an appealing mix of curry leaves and toasted almonds.

The main courses are even more gutsy. Samuelsson layers on flavors, generously anointing his crispy fried chicken with hot sauce, mace gravy and his own secret smoky spice shake; and piling pickled cipollini and plantain chips atop oxtail slow-braised in Mother's Milk Stout until it's barely clinging to the bone.

All of this food is as relaxed as the setting itself: breezy and cheerful. The sprawling space is inviting and buzzy, the definitive place to be north of 110th Street. Doubling as a gallery space, the restaurant showcases oversize works by notable New York artists, including uptown residents LeRone Wilson and Philip Maysles. Harlem politicos mix at the teardrop bar with downtown fashionistas, everyone happily gorging on rib-sticking food.

Posted:

Details

Address: 310 Malcolm X Blvd (Lenox Ave)
New York
10027
Cross street: between 125th and 126th Sts
Transport: Subway: 2, 3 to 125th St
Price: Average main course: $22. AmEx, Disc, MC, V
Contact:
Opening hours: Mon–Thu 11:30am–3pm, 4:30pm-2am; Fri 11:30am–3pm, 4:30pm-3am; Sat 10am–3pm, 4:30pm–3am; Sun 10am–3pm, 4:30pm–2am
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