Holly Graham is Time Out's former Hong Kong Contributor.

Holly Graham

Holly Graham

Articles (39)

Interview: Vietnam's 'The Lunch Lady' on Co Thanh

Interview: Vietnam's 'The Lunch Lady' on Co Thanh

Nguyen Thi Thành (aka The Lunch Lady), opened her food stall in Ho Chi Minh City in 1995, serving a rotation of noodle soups. At 6am every day, she hits the local markets to pick out the freshest ingredients to create 300 bowls of noodle soup that usually sell out by 1pm. Despite global fame, she continues to enjoy every moment of operating her business the same way since inception. Her one and only apprentice, Brian Woo, recently opened Co Thanh in Hong Kong. We chat to The Lunch Lady herself to find out more about the woman who inspired Hong Kong’s newest Vietnamese restaurant. How did things change after Anthony Bourdain featured you on No Reservations?My food stall always had a large local following prior to the airing of the show. Every day prior, I had customers that worked in the nearby offices line up for my soups. Since the show, I've had an influx of tourist and expat customers, too. But of course, the local community still visits me. How does the food at Co Thanh in Hong Kong differ to your stall in Ho Chi Minh City?Other than the noodle soups that I serve, Brian will be serving some other Vietnamese dishes like banh mi, spring rolls and rotating daily specials. What foods are you looking forward to trying when you visit Hong Kong?I've heard so much about Hong Kong's dim sum. It’s definitely a must try! How did Co Thanh come to life?Brian is my one and only apprentice. After training with me for three years, he proposed the idea as he’s been in the restaurant busin

A load-a pagodas: A journey through Bagan

A load-a pagodas: A journey through Bagan

Over the past five years, Myanmar has come a long, long way. Plagued by civil wars and human rights atrocities for as long as most natives can remember, the country formerly known as Burma has experienced untold hardships for decades. But 2011 saw the military junta finally dissolve and, since then, there has been a slow emergence from the dark days of yore, especially with the first civilian president, Htin Kyaw, being democratically elected earlier this year, opening Myanmar up to the world. And that means the tourist industry has been rapidly growing in the past couple of years as visitors clamour to see this incredibly beautiful land. Myanmar’s ancient city of Bagan is Southeast Asia’s oft overlooked temple hotspot, boasting Buddhist pagodas and monasteries that once stood 10,000 strong. The total now sits at around 2,200 due to years of war, decay and earthquakes. But these most definitely need to be seen. And the phrase ‘get there before the tourists ruin it’ rings true, so we recommend travelling to Bagan out of peak season, which basically means heading there in the rainy months between late May and early October. However, bear in mind that because Myanmar’s tourism industry is nascent, it does have its pros and cons. The cons are that it’s pretty pricy due to the lack of competition and, although getting around isn’t exactly difficult, it is tougher than, say, neighbouring countries like Thailand. But the positives far outweigh the negatives when visiting somewhere s

The best Kowloon hotels

The best Kowloon hotels

The best hotels in Hong Kong are spread all over the city but staying Kowloon-side gives you fantastic access to some cheap sleeps, great markets and excellent eats too. Snooty Hong Kong Islanders may call Kowloon ‘the dark side’ but we know Time Out Hong Kong readers aren’t as ignorant as all that. See the light and look forward to a stay in some of the best hotels anywhere in the city.

Seven romantic date ideas in Hong Kong

Seven romantic date ideas in Hong Kong

With Valentine’s Day coming up, it’s time to plan our the perfect romantic night out. If you’re looking to change it up from the usual Valentine’s Day dinner affair, here are some great romantic spots to treat your partner for the special holiday.  Want to stay in? Why not enjoy a sexy movie at home or get frisky around the city?

Hong Kong's top ten foodie stereotypes

Hong Kong's top ten foodie stereotypes

From high-end steakhouses to mouthwatering cheap eats, it's no secret that Hongkongers love eating. And these days, anyone who has a camera and knows one local noodle joint in a quasi hipster neighbourhood is a self-proclaimed foodie. Which is why we've rounded up the top ten foodie stereotypes we see in Hong Kong.

O que fazer em Hong Kong, das vistas às noites de karaoke

O que fazer em Hong Kong, das vistas às noites de karaoke

Caso não se recorde, a Time Out é de Lisboa mas é também de mais de uma centena de cidades espalhadas pelo mundo – o que significa que é, provavelmente, a maior e melhor rede global de especialistas locais. Nesta lista, Holly Graham, antiga editora de Comer & Beber na Time Out Hong Kong, guia-o pelas cinco coisas que tem de fazer em Hong Kong. A lista completa, feita por Olivia Lai e outros editores da Time Out, contempla 51 propostas, desde os melhores restaurantes às atracções que não pode mesmo perder. Mas, se for para uma escapadinha rápida, não se preocupe: temos as dicas perfeitas para si. Recomendado: As mais estranhas atracções de Hong Kong

Drink this: The Optimist

Drink this: The Optimist

The Optimist is a drink that defines my outlook in life – keep it simple. It’s helped me connect with people across the drinks industry. I’m a big fan of simple cocktails because they’re easy to make wherever you are and don’t require a lot of mise en place to be successfully executed.On a visit to Tokyo, I was overwhelmed by the amount of detail that Japanese bartenders put into their work. A recently opened bar that I visited, Mixology Salon in Tokyo, does a mean negroni. Working at an Italian restaurant like 8 1⁄2 Otto e Mezzo Bombana, we serve negronis all the time but at Mixology Salon, I ordered a green tea negroni, made with green tea-infused gin, Campari and vermouth. It was a delightful drink with a fine balance of flavour and the green tea added great herbal notes.I’ve tried to create something that’s as interesting to taste with The Optimist while not overcomplicating things. It’s inspired by the daiquiri and it’s designed to be straightforward and easy to make at any bar or at home – a lot my guests admit they give it a shot themselves! I created the cocktail as my entry for the Bacardi Legacy Global Cocktail Competition in 2015 and it helped me represent Hong Kong and Macau at the global finals in Sydney, Australia. A simple to make-anytime drink, personally, I’d recommend it for lunch or as an early evening aperitif. MAKE IT YOURSELFIngredients:60ml Bacardi Superior10ml ginger syrup10ml honey water22.5ml lime juiceYellow chartreuseHandful of basil leavesInstruct

The best eggs benedict in Hong Kong

The best eggs benedict in Hong Kong

Sick of chocolate eggs this Easter? Time to go back to basics and go for some good old fashion eggs benedict. It’s the perfect option for a brunch over the long Easter weekend. So, if you're past pancakes, waning with waffles or 'ad enough of avos, grab a cup of coffee and hunker down with some of the best benes in town.

Interview: Renee Dancel and Walaiphan Hanyut

Interview: Renee Dancel and Walaiphan Hanyut

Couple Renee Dancel and and Walaiphan Hanyut (aka Lek) first met in Hong Kong more than a year ago. Dancel dreamed of being a lawyer but having grown up in Manila helping her mum in the family’s fast food restaurant, the food industry was in her blood from day one. Lek, hailing from Phrae in northern Thailand, also found culinary inspiration cooking with her mother from a young age. The pair first met at Thai restaurant Chachawan in late 2015 where Lek was a commis chef and Dancel was a floor supervisor. Dancel fell in love with Lek almost immediately but says of her partner: “She was hesitant at first and too kind to tell me she didn’t like me. But my persistence paid off!”Krua Walaiphan came about after the couple became official and realised they shared the same dream of opening a restaurant one day. Understandably, working as a couple has its challenges, though. “Sometimes I don’t want to work with Renee as she’s too tough and straightforward,” teases Lek. “Jokes aside, we make sure to help each other out in the kitchen and on the floor.” Both agree that communication and treating each other like colleagues, not partners, is key. Having struggled to get where they are, the pair are keen to inspire other women with their journey. “As ethnic minority female entrepreneurs without any strong financial backing, we hope to inspire women to believe in themselves and dare to dream,” declares Dancel. “Be strong enough to face criticism and don’t let it stop you from doing what you

Interview: Matt Walsh

Interview: Matt Walsh

Craft beer brewery Gweilo is going from strength to strength. From humble bedroom beginnings, the company is now set to open Hong Kong’s largest craft brewery in the summer. Located in Fo Tan, the US$5 million, 7,000sq ft facility should churn out enough beer to meet the high demand the local brewery is now enjoying.Originally founded by husband- and-wife duo Ian and Emily Jebbitt and their friend Joe Gould, Gweilo is now joined by one of the biggest names in the American craft brewing business – Matt Walsh.The California native started out home brewing as a teen, inspired after sampling some craft beers before a gig. Walsh muses: “It was illegal to drink at that age but it just added to the fun.” Initially choosing to pursue a career in the navy, he left after several years and got his first professional brewing break working for AleSmith in San Diego.A long stint at Karl Strauss Brewing Company followed during which Walsh would quickly clean and fill kegs in order to take on other work. “Having an aptitude for this type of bottom-rung work helped me advance rapidly and I eventually became head brewer,” he says. Walsh worked at several other breweries and most recently helped open Modern Times, also based in San Diego.Despite his many successes in California, Walsh was keen to move to Asia. He discovered Gweilo through an advert on an online brewing job platform and met with the team, saying: “I learned about Gweilo’s successes and goals and decided it’d be a great opportuni

The future of food

The future of food

It was more about evolution than revolution throughout 2017 in terms of food trends in our city. Hongkongers’ growing preference for vegetarian dining continued, as did a desire for more sustainable eating. Will 2018 maintain this holding pattern or are we in for things new and daring? We speak to those in the know.And if you’re skint this Christmas after too many parties and too many presents, don’t forget to check our guide to the best cheap eats in Hong Kong.

Listings and reviews (46)

Shari Shari Kakigori House

Shari Shari Kakigori House

This small joint tucked away down a cul-de-sac in Causeway Bay is a simple space, in Japanese minimalist fashion, serving a range of desserts including kakigori made from ice imported from Hokkaido. The superior quality of the water there makes for cleaner tasting and silky smooth ice – perfect when piled with cream, syrup, fruits and mochi. The enticing flavours include tiramisu, sakura and warabi mochi and more. The strawberries and cream kakigori is pretty in pink and the heavenly combination of fluffy ice and sweet, smooth cream is delightful. Prices start from $50.

Fang Fang (CLOSED)

Fang Fang (CLOSED)

4 out of 5 stars

The newest addition to Lan Kwai Fong, Fang Fang has a broad pan-Asian menu that’s rich and diverse. With experienced names from Hong Kong and abroad heading the bar and kitchen, both food and drinks consistently deliver. Occupying the former Casa Lisboa spot in LKF Tower, Fang Fang is a spacious, chic space with touches of Asian flair. There’s one of those now compulsory half-baked fictional backstories (thanks Mrs Pound, Foxglove et al) claiming the restaurant is named after a mysterious Chinese opera singer, but that’s of little interest compared to who’s running the show. The kitchen is helmed by chef Kent Lee Chin-heng, formerly of Hakkasan Mumbai and London’s Kai Mayfair, while the bar is managed by Gagan Gurung, who earned a stellar reputation during his time at Zuma. Quite the formidable pair when it comes to contemporary Asian cuisine and cocktails, then. Settling in for a drink first, we start with an Omikuji Girl, a mix of chilli tequila, barley sochu, yuzu, cardamom, shiso and five spice powder that comes served in a cup shaped like a female doll. A fragrant and spicy lass, the well-balanced ingredients and aesthetic appeal make for a fine combination. The Trai Dat, is an even cuter drink served in a panda-shaped vessel. The adorable cup is filled with turmeric gin, coconut milk, pineapple, lemon and ginger. The result is a tropical drink much like a pina colada with a Thai twist. Another winner. Moving from bar to dinner table, we start with five spice squid and c

Museum of Macau

Museum of Macau

This museum details the history of our sister SAR and, located in Mount Fortress, it’s conveniently close to the ruins of St Paul’s, allowing you to tick off two tourist attractions at once. The museum is the perfect place to educate yourself on Macanese history and culture. 

Bar De Luxe

Bar De Luxe

4 out of 5 stars

New sky-high Japanese cocktail hotspot Bar De Luxe comes courtesy of legendary bartender Hidetsugu Ueno, the man behind Tokyo’s famous Bar High Five, a venue that’s consistently rated among the world’s best. This Hong Kong outpost is helmed by the icon’s protégé, Yuriko Naganuma, who mastered her craft under Ueno and another of Japan’s most decorated bartenders, Takao Mori. The bar is part of Attire House, which touts itself as a gentlemen’s haven that also provides tailoring and grooming services. And in the watering hole, the teal walls and magnificent bar, which is carved from Japanese walnut, scream opulence. Floor-to-ceiling windows open up to a fab view of Central’s apartment blocks too. There’s a lack of ambient lighting and music, which isn’t ideal but this experience, at least, is in keeping with quality Japanese cocktail venues of the same ilk. Taking a seat at the bar, we choose The Hidden Gem ($168). This blend of Nikka From The Barrel whisky, Japanese yomogi (mugwort) herb liqueur, Averna Amaro and sugarcane syrup is gloriously golden brown. While the herb liqueur is medicinal at the front, it’s rounded out on a spiced note. The silkiness of the whisky is complementedby the caramel notes of the Averna Amaro, making for a smooth, incredible sip. We also try The Plum Beauty ($168). It mixes Kirin Fuji Sanroku whisky, plum and ginger wine and cinnamon liqueur. The cinnamon is pleasant on the nose and the sharp plum kicks back delightfully. A masterclass in mixolog

Gough’s on Gough

Gough’s on Gough

4 out of 5 stars

Helmed by head chef Arron Rhodes, a man who has worked at Michelin starred establishments and ones that have made the World’s 50 Best list, the venue is British furniture maestro Timothy Oulton’s first-ever restaurant.It’s hard to miss on, you guessed it, Gough Street, what with the 1940s diving suit inside a tank of piranhas that sits by the entrance. Given Oulton’s involvement, it’s no surprise that the restaurant area is replete with vintage touches. The most fabulous is a wall completely covered in white feathers, which looks heavenly.We’re seated in a booth and examine the menu, which is heavy on modern British cuisine with nods to chef Rhodes’ experience working in southeast Asia and Peru, and our hopes are high.For starters, we opt for Peruvian corn and beef tartar. The sweetness of the corn is boosted by a chicha morada infusion while the citrus notes from the leche de tigre jazz up the accompanying warm avocado. Toastiness comes in the form of popped kaniwa grains. The creamy, tender tartar is presented in a crunchy, cigar-shaped pastry and the piccalilli on the side adds a sweet and sour kick. A great start.For mains, we begin with the handmade gnocchi, which is perfectly al dente. The saltiness of the six-month matured comte cheese sauce cuts through the earthiness of the fresh herbs also present, as do the vinegary pickled potatoes. Next to arrive is the fish of the day: wild Scottish salmon served with Cornish mussels, a light curry and coconut emulsion and sweet

Plato86

Plato86

3 out of 5 stars

Alvin Leung, arguably one of Hong Kong’s most famous chefs — he’s one of three judges on the popular reality cooking show MasterChef Canada - has opened a new casual tapas restaurant in Wan Chai. He's also the brains behind three Michelin starred Bo Innovation and one starred MIC Kitchen.Located in the Brim 28 complex, close to Leung’s Korean concept Bib N Hops, Plato86 touts itself as traditional Spanish cuisine with modern touches and contemporary presentation. The restaurant is large and airy with white tables and chairs, complete with outdoor seating, giving the eatery an overall Mediterranean vibe.We pitch up at a booth and tick off our tapas, starting with octopus crudo ($128), served with mojo verde, Piedmont pepper sauce and puréed sweet potato. The octopus is wonderfully tender, well complemented by the sauces with some crunch and sweetness from sliced and sauteed red onion. Next is the broken egg potato tarta ($35) and it’s disappointing. Though the egg is runny and the potatoes fluffy, they're drowned in olive oil, making for a rather soggy dish.For mains, the Valencian paella ($165) with chicken, chorizo and saffron is the perfect size for two. The paella is one of the more authentic offerings we’ve had in town, with a satisfying silky oiliness from the robust chorizo but a little lacking in chicken. We finish up with some sad, floppy churros ($70). Served with a rich dark chocolate sauce, the churros themselves are undercooked on the inside and fall apart.Conside

Veggi Monster

Veggi Monster

3 out of 5 stars

With the likes of Kale relocating to Causeway Bay and the sad closure of Home: Eat To Live, Central and Sheung Wan are suddenly down decent vegetarian options. Doing its bit to fill the gap is Veggi Monster, a brand new hole-in-the-wall vegan joint tucked off of Wing Lok Street.  The menu is small – just a couple of burgers and wraps plus desserts and daily salads. We order the Burger in Black ($78), a sizeable organic black bean and quinoa burger topped with melted non-dairy cheese, portobello mushrooms, truffle sauce, kale and tomato sandwiched between a charcoal bun. The bun is fluffy but solid enough to confidently cradle the fillings. The patty has an overpowering flavour that crowds out the truffle sauce, but the playful textures and crunch provided by the kale mean we don’t miss our beef. It’s a decent veggie burger – not the best we’ve had and though it leaves us with unattractive black bits in our teeth, it does the job. We also grab a wrap ($55) filled with lion’s mane mushroom, quinoa, mixed greens, almond slices, tomato and vegan salad sauce. Decidedly average, whatever ‘vegan salad sauce’ is, it’s way too fruity and the mushrooms are a little squeaky on our teeth. Though it makes for a serviceable snack, we plan to stick with the burgers in the future.  Veggi Monster won’t be giving the crew at Mana many sleepless nights but taken as a tiny, reasonably-priced operation for grabbing a healthy bite on the go, it’s good enough. Oh, and they sell metal straws with cl

Terroir Parisien

Terroir Parisien

3 out of 5 stars

Yannick Alléno, a man with six Michelin stars under his belt, has brought to Central’s Prince’s Building a branch of his French bistro, Terroir Parisien. Given Alléno’s reputation, our expectations are high – too high, as it turns out. The menu, stuffed with various different sets and happy hours, is filled with classic French dishes but, despite being touted as the quintessential Parisian bistro, Terroir’s decor is surprisingly modern and unremarkable. Once we finish deciphering the overloaded menu, we order onion soup with comté cheese and croutons ($118) to start. Aware we are sharing, the staff, though skittish, are friendly and ask if we’d like the serving split in two. Once the scalding dish cools, we sip on the rich broth. It’s a little too beefy, despite a satisfying stringiness from the cheese, and we wish there was more tartness from the onions. For our mains, we order sea scallops cooked over a simmered rice pilaf in an aromatic broth with fresh herbs ($288) and Christian Parra’s black pudding and soft potato purée cooked French style ($248). The hefty price tags reflect the large portions, which come served in Staub skillets. There’s something horribly dated about the presentation of both dishes and not in a quaint way. The scallops are off-puttingly topped with diced carrot – making them look like devilled eggs – and any flavour the bivalves may bare is drowned out by the aromatic rice. It’s not awful but we want scallops, not a plate of stock saturated rice

Aziza

Aziza

4 out of 5 stars

A new Egyptian restaurant on Hau Wo Street, with great food, reasonable prices and ever-so-friendly staff, Aziza is the perfect opening following the recent closure of Hollywood Road’s fab Egyptian eatery, The Nile. Aziza’s a small, family-run joint with hand painted murals and the menu includes all the expected Middle Eastern and North African favourites. We begin by ordering hummus ($19), zabadi ($28) and babaganoush ($38), all of which come with a generous serving of pitta bread. The hummus is some of the freshest and best we’ve had in a long time, with a healthy dose of garlic satisfying our taste buds. The babaganoush lacks a little smokiness but it’s still a good ’un. We dip our vine leaf rice wraps into the zabadi – a yoghurt dip with cucumber, garlic, mint and olive oil – and it’s a match made in heaven, the creaminess of the dip mellowing the aromatic rice. The halloumi is halloumi, in that, halloumi is almost always good. What we really appreciate is the expert charring that brings out the full buttery, salty flavour of the cheese without making it too rubbery. The starters get a thumbs up all round from wallets and stomachs alike. Moving on, we order a mixed grill of lamb kofta, cubed beef skewers and chicken thigh with a side of fluffy couscous ($180). Though all the meats are tasty, the beef and chicken are a tad tough. The kofta are definitely the winners here. Perfectly seasoned with a medley of fresh herbs, the lamb is juicy and crumbly, as any good kofta shou

Mr Wolf

Mr Wolf

4 out of 5 stars

The king of producing inoffensive, middle-of-the-road restaurants – like its flagship chain, Jaspas – Castelo Concepts is looking to take things up a notch with Mr Wolf, its new opening in Central. The man charged with this task is chef Jamie Draper, who arrives with some pedigree having spent the last five years training under legendary father and son duo Albert and Michel Roux Junior, who together hold five Michelin stars. The space itself is airy and inviting, making us feel as if we’ve strolled into a brasserie in a trendy London suburb. It’s a theme that continues on the menu, which is focused on British gastropub fare with sops to continental European and Asian cuisines. We start with the soft shell crab with mayonnaise, gochujang – Korean red chilli paste – and papaya salad ($180). A solid dish, the mayo has a satisfying pepperiness similar to kimchi and the crab has been lightly battered without drying out the meat. The papaya salad lacks oomph but there’s a satisfyingly fresh crunch. Our other starter, rustic pork belly and chicken liver terrine with sticky figs and sourdough ($178) arrives and we begin to notice a theme – prices are fairly high but the portion sizes don't skimp. The terrine is smooth with just enough bite provided by the pork belly. The sticky figs, though more soggy than sticky, cut nicely through the richness of the chicken liver.  For mains, the pappardelle with duck ragu ($175) is a hearty offering replete with generous chunks of duck. Not too d

Boilermaker

Boilermaker

3 out of 5 stars

Shiny new beer and whisky bar Boilermaker snuck onto Staunton Street with very little fanfare, appearing almost like it was there all along. That is, it’s a good fit. The front of the bar, like most of its neighbours, opens invitingly onto the pavement and high stools and tables dot the venue, which has a reasonably small bar. The interior is rustic meets industrial chic – we imagine it would be quite cosy come winter. Exposed filament light bulbs on copper pipes give the bar a warm orange glow that, if a tad dimmer, would create a better ambience. Walls are exposed brick and drinks are served on thick cuts of log acting as coasters. Onto one of life’s greater pairings, beer and whisky – or boilermakers, hence the name. Whisky-wise, it’s mostly scotch with a couple of options from Ireland and Japan. On the beer side, there’s six local brews and three international additions, with tasting sets for both whisky and beer available. We opt for the Monkey King amber ale ($60) and Teeling whisky ($180), with this particular Teeling being a small batch aged in rum casks. It’s a beautiful, smooth dram with a soft but full-bodied vanilla aroma that encompasses the palate. There’s a definite spice from the rum casks and the apple pie hints make this dreamy dram dessert-like in its finish.  The beer - from the Moonzen brewery in Kwun Tong - is a gorgeous shade of reddish amber. There’s fruity pomelo notes with a saltiness at the front but it’s nicely rounded out but a blanket of caramel.

News (81)

Hong Kong’s 10 typical Tinder types

Hong Kong’s 10 typical Tinder types

Ah, Valentine’s Day. That greeting card holiday that singletons criticise as a grossly commercialised mockery of love while couples frantically try to rekindle their original spark, often to be disappointed. But rather than be alone on this holiday, might as well set Tinder on fire, right? What have you got to lose? Here are the types you’re most likely to see... Totes emojiHere’s hoping you don’t match with that one idiot who can only chat in emojis. Pokey tongue, wink face, praise hands, anyone? If you swipe right for a person who’s bio is made up of emojis that ambiguously hint at their hobbies, the results are your own fault.  Mr/Ms “I’m just here to make friends”Lots of people claim they’re on Tinder solely to make friends and meet new people. Yeah, right. Who’re they trying to kid? But if you legitimately are, stop wasting everyone’s time. Most people are here because they’re... DTFObviously the real reason most people are on Tinder. If you’re not familiar with this acronym, best get yourself on Urban Dic… tionary. It definitely doesn’t stand for xiaolongbao purveyor Din Tai Fung, just in case you were wondering. Although the baos there are quite sexy. XXXLB, anyone?  NSA/FWBDTFers are usually looking for no strings attached (NSA) or friends with benefits (FWB) and, actually, they’re the least unnerving of the reprobates on Tinder. At least they typically suggest meeting for drinks so you can lay eyes on each other before you decide if you want to get a room. But, it’s

Hong Kong’s top 10 places to get it on

Hong Kong’s top 10 places to get it on

With Valentine’s just around the corner, it’s time to start considering our city’s steamiest spots.1. Peak Gardens The Peak is one of Hong Kong’s top tourist havens but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to find a quiet spot for a bit of slap and tickle. Take the Peak Gardens, for example. Not only is it green and romantic, there’re plenty of bushes to get busy in.2. The toilets at Ozone Bars, more often than not, are the first port of call when it comes to getting laid, and Hong Kong’s highest bar at the top of the ICC comes with added benefits. Not only is the Ritz-Carlton bar swanky, if you get jiggy in Ozone’s toilets, it’s probably the closest you can get to the mile high club in Hong Kong without boarding a flight. Discuss your cock tales over cocktails and clink a cheeky cheers to that. 3. Lamma Power Station Beach Arguably one of the most picturesque beaches Hong Kong has to offer (if looming power station chimneys belching smog into the air gets you going), Lamma Power Station Beach is our top pick for sun, sea, sand and sex. What with all the rubbish washing ashore, you might even find a condom floating about. Bonus!4. Ngong Ping 360 The Ngong Ping cable car is an experience in itself but the 360 version, complete with a glass bottom, offers 360-degree views as you climb through the mountains to meet the Big Buddha. If you’re fortunate enough to find yourself and your object of desire alone, you’ve got 10 minutes to put ass to the glass and get rocking. Just make sur

Free ice cream at Emack and Bolio’s new shop tomorrow

Free ice cream at Emack and Bolio’s new shop tomorrow

There’s no such thing as a free lunch, but how about free ice cream after lunch? Boston ice cream imports Emack and Bolio’s are opening a new store on Wan Chai’s Lee Tung Avenue and are giving the first 300 customers a free scoop this Friday November 10. In exchange for your free scoop, you’ll have to follow them on Instagram or Facebook, so bring your smartphone and ready your elbows for some serious shoving from 2pm this Friday. 2pm, Friday November 10. Shops G09 & G10L, Lee Tung Ave, 200 Queen's Rd East, Wan Chai.

Yardbird closes this Saturday before relocation

Yardbird closes this Saturday before relocation

Yardbird is serving up its final feast at the Bridges Street location this Saturday, November 11. After more than six years in the business, Yardbird has attracted diners by the hordes, thanks to being the kind of super hip izakaya/yakitori venue that not even Tokyo denizens would roll their eyes at. The chicken here is treated no differently than the finest piece of toro. That is, with love and care. And it returns the favour by donating literally every part of its body including the thigh, wing, neck, liver, tail or skin. Yardbird 2.0 is expected to have around 95 seats in total with a much bigger kitchen and plans to expand the menu once the team are all settled in. Founder Lindsay Jang says: "I’m so excited to have a bigger space for our team. We’ll finally have space for a freezer – it’s crazy that we’ve been functioning without one for all this time – an office, a staff room, a private dining area and more. We'll also have a later license so we’ll be serving food and drinks past midnight which will serve the industry." Head in and get your fix, as it'll be a few weeks before Yardbird reopens at its new home on 154-158 Wing Lok Street at the end of this month. We predict lines outside the new venue, but hopefully the bigger space will mean shorter waiting times. 

Jay Khan's agave-focussed bar Coa set to take over the old Neo space

Jay Khan's agave-focussed bar Coa set to take over the old Neo space

Forget whisky dens. Agave-forward drinking programmes are so now in Hong Kong. Hot on the heels of 11 Westside came Los Sotano, joining the year-old Mezcalito and stalwarts such as Brickhouse. And now, say hi to new kid on the block Coa. The brains behind this new bar – taking over the old Neo space on Shin Hing Street in Sheung Wan – is Jay Khan, a man with quite the CV. He’s won several awards, tended bars from Melbourne to Macau, is the Remy Cointreau ambassador and was at the helm of Hong Kong bars Foxglove and Dr Fern’s Gin Parlour. But now it’s time for him to do his own thang. Coa – named after the agave harvesting machete – is set to serve a unique cocktail programme, featuring fermented drinks such as tepache – made with pineapple skin and cinnamon – artisanal cocktails and Mexican liquors such as agave spirits tequila and mezcal.   A man and his agave         Khan, who’s currently upping his knowledge in Oaxaca, Mexico, tells us, “In a nutshell, it’s a craft cocktail bar focusing on agave spirits and Mexican inspired drinking culture, in a rustic, industrial setting. So we’re going to have things like tepache which is traditionally made with pineapple, but we’ll have flavours such as watermelon, mint and a few more flavours depending on seasonal ingredients. We are also going to serve our mezcal exactly the way they do in Oaxaca, in a jicara – a small bowl-like vessel, with sal de gusano (worm salt) or chapulines (grasshoppers)”. No more tequila slammers, then! Co

Exclusive: Pirata Group announces its latest concept 'Balls'

Exclusive: Pirata Group announces its latest concept 'Balls'

Hong Kong's rapidly expanding Pirata Group has given us a sneak peek of its new meatball pop-up Balls. Yes, we've all had a giggle at the name. Bet you have too. Any innuendos from here on out may or may not be intentional, your call. Hot on the heels of the groups' brand new opening Meats and joining the stable of solid eateries including Pirata, TokyoLima, Pici and The Optimist, this no-reservations meatball-centric restaurant will only be open for 100 days on Wan Chai's Star Street. With a colourful, retro pop themed interior, this 40 seater also has outdoor terrace seating. The pop-up sees Pirata Group chefs serve up their own meatball recipes, alongside starters and desserts. Tasty balls include TokyoLima chef Arturo Melendez's recipe Bolas Latinas with Peruvian aji panka red peppers and chef Alfredo Rodriguez's of The Optimist fishballs with squid and prawns on fragrant pilaf rice. Meats' chef Paddy McDermott is serving up MEATSballs of rotisserie chicken with blue cheese and jalapeno relish and Pirata’s meatballs get the sub treatment in the Big Sub, topped with melted fontina cheese by chef Stefano Rossi. Pici's chef Andrea Viglione is rolling out Ste Palle! –homemade tagliatelle with pork and beef meatballs slathered in a spicy arrabbiata sauce. Falafel balls Free Balling – a sneak peak of Pirata Group's next project Last up is the vegetarian Free Balling – falafel, hummus and mint yoghurt sandwiched in warm pita bread – a preview of Pirata Group's 'top secret' new

Old Fashioned Week comes to Hong Kong

Old Fashioned Week comes to Hong Kong

Old Fashioned Week hits Hong Kong this Thursday November 2, celebrating one of our favourite cocktails. Much like Negroni Week, bartenders will be serving up their twist on the classic old fashioned in 23 venues across the cities. Sip on the likes of the Old Cubanos at The Old Man - Havana Club Seleccion De Maestro, PX sherry, chocolate, Angostura and orange bitters and sugar cane syrup or Fang Fang's Asian old fashioned with Monkey Shoulder whisky, 8 year old Chinese wine, three-month barrel aged plum wine and Angostura bitters. For a list of participating venues and drinks, visit old-fashioned-week.com. November 2-11

Designer Ashley Sutton opens Japanese-inspired nightclub in Central

Designer Ashley Sutton opens Japanese-inspired nightclub in Central

Ashley Sutton, the designer behind Dining Concepts venues Iron Fairies, Ophelia and J.Boroski once again collaborates with the food and beverage group on their new club Yojimbo on Pottinger Street – occupying the space that formerly housed Boujis. Expect top notch drinks, international DJs and a variety of performances in this Japanese-inspired venue named after the classic 1961 Akira Kurosawa samurai movie Yojimbo  – a favourite of Sutton’s. Sutton has venues in Japan and Yojimbo pays homage to the underground bars of Tokyo’s glitzy Ginza district and his love for their quirkiness. Much like these venues, Yojimbo offers different experiences around the club, from a cocktail lounge to dancefloor and performance stage on which geishas, samurai schoolgirls, Harajuku punks, Hannya girls and anime-inspired spirits will strut their stuff.   Alberto Aldave     On the decks is DJ Aaron James – a spinner who has opened for stars including Elton John and Eminem and DJ’d with the likes of Mark Ronson. Expect hip hop, trap, booty breaks, dancehall, electro rock and much more from James’ speakers. With club nights names such as Samurai Night Fever Saturdays – ghetto funk, electro rock and future house and Discozilla Wednesdays – glitchy disco beats and indie nu disco, it sounds like there’s plenty of dancing to be had. Behind the stick is Alberto Aldave – previously of The Rivoli Bar at The Ritz London – mixing Japanese-inspired cocktails. Expect Japanese whiskies and cocktails includi

Sip new cocktails at one of the world's best bars in Hong Kong

Sip new cocktails at one of the world's best bars in Hong Kong

The World's 50 Best Bars List 2017 was announced earlier this month with Shangri-La's Lobster Bar ranking at 49. It's one of only two Hong Kong bars to make the cut, along with Quinary which currently ranks at number 10 on Asia's 50 Best Bars list. Lobster Bar's new bar manager Anne-Sophie Cros – formerly of the awesome Bar Termini in London – has created a new menu with head bartender Paolo De Venuto featuring 10 tasty new tipples influenced by the past, present and future. Top picks include the Taste of Ling (pictured above) – a cocktail dedicated to a long-standing regular of the bar – made with Beefeater gin, elderflower, ginger and vanilla. You can also try The Therapy (pictured below), made from a home-made horchata blend of cashew nuts, rice, sugar and water, spiked with Chivas Regal 12 plus mango and vetiver.Of course, classic cocktails are also on offer, along with a selection of premium spirits, aperitifs, wines, champagnes and craft beers, along with the bar's awesome snack selection. Head over and treat yourself to the best, because you're worth it... probably.Check out our pick of the best bars in Hong Kong for more bars to crawl.  

Matt Walsh to join the Gweilo team to open Hong Kong's biggest craft brewery

Matt Walsh to join the Gweilo team to open Hong Kong's biggest craft brewery

Craft beer Gweilo has gone from strength to strength. From humble bedroom beginnings, the craft brewers are set to open Hong Kong’s largest craft brewery next summer. Located in Fo Tan, the US$5million, 7,000sq ft venue will be churning out enough beer to meet the high demand. Originally founded by husband and wife duo Ian and Emily Jebbitt, along with their friend Joe Gould, joining them will be one of the biggest names in the craft brewing business - Matt Walsh. Walsh, like the Gweilo team, began his craft beer journey by home brewing. After several years working in the Military and Department of Defence, he decided to turn his hobby into a career. His first brewing job was at AleSmith in San Diego, followed by a long stint at Karl Strauss Brewing Company where he eventually became head brewer. He was also the head brewer of Speakeasy and Lost Coast Brewery and most recently opened Modern Times before moving to Hong Kong. On working with Gweilo, Walsh says, ‘I leapt at the opportunity to join them and once again build a new brewery. I have always loved visiting Asia, so the opportunity to live and work here, along with the excitement of launching a new facility, were too much to pass up’. For more on Matt and move to Hong Kong, look out for our feature in the upcoming issue of Time Out Hong Kong, due out this December.

Grab tasty $5 toasties at 22 Ships throughout October

Grab tasty $5 toasties at 22 Ships throughout October

Progressive tapas joint 22 Ships does a mean toastie, and this month they're bargain toasties. To celebrate its fifth anniversary, 22 Ships will be dishing up its jamon, manchego and truffle toasties topped with a quail's egg for a bargain $5. Which is cheap for any morsel in Hong Kong, let alone something that normally costs $88. You can't go mental though – orders are limited to one per table with any purchase.

Two Hong Kong bars make the World's 50 Best Bars list

Two Hong Kong bars make the World's 50 Best Bars list

2017's World's 50 Best Bars list was announced in London last night and two Hong Kong bars have held their spots. Legendary bartender Antonio Lai's Quinary moved up one place from last year's 41 to 40 and the Shangri-La's Lobster Bar slipped from 27 to 49.  Though we're glad the two bars remain some of the world's best, we're a bit gutted that there aren't more of Hong Kong's awesome watering holes featured. And Singapore has kicked our butt with a whopping six venues. Sigh.  Check out our very own list of Hong Kong's 50 best bars here. For a list of Asia's 50 Best Bars 2017, click here.