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Lisa Cam

Lisa Cam

Articles (35)

Hong Kong’s best siu mei

Hong Kong’s best siu mei

Siu mei – think deliciously cured meats hanging in restaurant front windows, dripping in their flavourful juices – is one of Hong Kong’s signature cuisines. Here are some of the city’s tastiest purveyors of these carnivorous delights.

The best cheap eats in Hong Kong

The best cheap eats in Hong Kong

We all know that Hong Kong is a famously expensive city, and last year it was revealed by the Julius Baer Lifestyle Index that our hometown is the most expensive in Asia when it comes to fine dining. But forget the luxury side of things, you can still eat cheap in Hong Kong – and eat well, too. Don’t believe us? Here are 50 of the best cheap in Hong Kong costing less than $50.RECOMMENDED: Satisfied your hunger? How about some cheap things to do in Hong Kong? Or what about free activities?

Check in: Windsor Plaza Hotel Ho Chi Minh

Check in: Windsor Plaza Hotel Ho Chi Minh

Ho Chi Minh is a charming city with great food, fantastic coffee and a bustling atmosphere that will leave even the most hardened of Hongkongers breathless. While the city’s central District 1 is where most of the action is, if you prefer to stay somewhere with more local charm then Windsor Plaza Hotel in neighbouring District 5 is a good choice. Nestled in the heart of the city’s Chinatown, the hotel is fitted with emblems of oriental opulence such as ornate marble-tiled floors that extend from the lobby to the lifts as well as gorgeous crystal chandeliers dotted throughout the property.The roomsThe huge hotel complex houses 376 contemporary and spacious rooms and suites which offer panoramic views of Cho Lon, Saigon’s historic Chinatown. Every room is fitted with high definition smart TV and seamless WiFi that’s available for multiple devices. White marble panelling adds a touch of elegance to the bathroom with a deep tub so you can relax in style.The facilitiesWhere do we even begin? Well, the restaurants alone are enough to get you tickled. First, there’s the Café Central An Dong that is one of the most impressive buffets in Ho Chi Minh city. Ngan Dinh is a restaurant that has the best seafood Vietnam can offer prepared in authentic Chinese-style cooking as well as Top of the Town that offers unobstructed panoramic views of Ho Chi Minh City. Add to this a swimming pool on the rooftop, fitness centre and even a kids room for those travelling with the brood, there’s plenty

A quick history of pun choi

A quick history of pun choi

It has been said that pun choi was originally invented by early residents of the New Territories who cooked up the colossal dish for celebratory occasions such as weddings, births and Chinese New Year. These days, it has been adopted as a traditional Chinese New Year food and become appropriated by mainstream media, making the origins of the adored fare even more cloudy. Nevertheless, despite all the stories, the most plausible one is also the most bittersweet.Legend has it that during the late Song Dynasty, when Mongol troops were invading China, the emperor fled to the areas around Guangdong province and Hong Kong. When the royal family and their army passed through the New Territories, the locals wanted to host them but their resources were limited. Thus, they gathered all the best ingredients they had available, cooked them, and because there were not enough containers, they put the food inside large wooden washbasins – giving birth to the celebrated dish.Naturally, preparing food fit for royalty could be quite time consuming and, traditionally, it would take three days. Firewood would be collected on the first day for the cooking marathon that would follow, and the second day was used to slaughter the livestock and marinate the meat. The last day was for cooking the ingredients, which could take over 10 hours.There are at least eight different types of main ingredients in a classic pun choi, including turnip, mushroom, chicken and pork. When eaten, it may seem that the i

Hong Kong pizza crawl

Hong Kong pizza crawl

Our city is home to some seriously good pizza. Although we can’t claim the same heritage as Rome or New York, the Fragrant Harbour makes up for it with loads of variety. So slip into your stretchy pants and join Lisa Cam on a tour full of carbs, glorious carbs… Illustration by Jessica Li

Interview: Harry Shum

Interview: Harry Shum

Harry Shum Jr. was born in Costa Rica to Chinese parents making a new life for themselves,only for the whole family to migrate to Los Angeles when he was only six years old. Shumsheepishly admits his Cantonese could be better but it’s good enough for him to fall in love with movies by Stephen Chow, Jacky Chan and Chow Yun Fat – there’s no denying that Shum is as third state as anyone could get. Known for a while as the ‘other Asian’ on Fox Network’s hit TV show Glee, he was given a major storyline in the third season episode titled Asian F, where it depicts the struggle between an Asian student and his parents who want him to pursue academia rather than the arts. Upbeat and optimistic, the Step Up 2 actor didn’t have it as hard as Mike Chang, the character he portrayed in Glee. “[My parents] didn’t oppose my choice to be a dancer per se, rather, they would throw a lot of options my way, like telling me so and so has become a clerk or something. That’s always a parent’s concern; whether their child could make a living. My parents presented me with the reality of my career choice and that there are limited roles for Asians in Hollywood, but they never disapproved. My mum is a painter and never pursued that talent, I think that played a part in their attitude towards me.”While many Asian actors have been speaking up about whitewashing of Asian roles inHollywood and are understandably frustrated about the issue, Shum, on the other hand, decides to take a more positive perspective

The best cheap eats in the New Territories

The best cheap eats in the New Territories

Our city is a gastronomic paradise, but you don’t have to spend a fortune to eat well. Here’s a round-up of the best meals, snacks and deals you can buy in the New Territories – all for under $50!Looking for more to do in the New Territories? Don’t miss our guide to Tai Po and its restaurants.

Check in: St Regis Osaka

Check in: St Regis Osaka

Understated luxury, those are two words which aptly describe the St Regis brand.Known as one of the few ultra luxury brand of hotels in the world, St Regis has built itsname through exceptional service, impeccable surrounds and the brand’s signatureconcierge service where every room is assigned with a personal butler. And the spirit ofthis luxury exceeds expectations at the property in Osaka. Not only is there a Cantonese-speaking butler to specifically service Hong Kong tourists, a simple request to makerestaurant reservations comes along with instructions of how to get there that includesnotes about other attractions you might like to visit before or after you dine. This attention to detail is topped off with a taxi waiting to take you where you need to go that awaits for you when you reach the lobby. There’s no doubt you’ll be treated truly like royalty at the St Regis.The roomsAll the suites in the 160-room property are drenched in soothing tones of caramel andbeige alongside Asian-inspired accents throughout the decor. WiFi and high-def TVsare a must at such an establishment but the marble bathroom with double vanity,rainforest shower and bathtub equipped with a built-in flat screen TV allows you to relaxin style and convenience.The facilitiesIf you’re ever in need of anything outside of the previously mentioned 24-hour conciergeservice then there is also a fully equipped gym and four restaurants such as Rue D’Orand the beautiful St Regis Bar and Terrace where it overloo

Hong Kong's best rooftop farms

Hong Kong's best rooftop farms

City Farm Osbert Lam came to farming quite late but once he started he never looked back. His passion project, City Farm, is located on three different rooftops in the city. As a laidback father of two, he uses his farms as a retreat from the rat race pace of Hong Kong. His passion has since spread to others, and he and his volunteers help rooftop farming enthusiasts grow more than 20 varieties of fruit and vegetables organically in boxes rented out for $160 a month. To ensure the best environment for his crops, Lam imports soil from Germany and mixes different types to make the crops as perfect as possible. The sun and rainwater are free, and sticky paper strips keep bugs away, so farmers can be sure of a bumper harvest year after year. Rooftop, Zung Fu Industrial Bldg, 1067 King’s Rd, Quarry Bay, 2156 9163; cityfarm.hk. Time to Grow Andrew Tsui and Pol Fàbrega co-founded Time to Grow with the aim of green-ifying the town. But unlike urban farmers in other cities who grow crops for profit, these rooftop gardeners are mostly hobbyists who spend their off-hours cultivating vegetables for fun and relaxation. And they’ve recently collaborated with Jones Lang Lasalle, setting up a farm on top of the Bank of America in Central. Tsui believes in the importance of social engagement, which is why he has also set up workshops along with his consultancy services to promote sustainable living. Among those, the bespoke classes are designed to show people how easy and enjoyable urban fa

Eat it like a pro: Learn how to eat a host of tricky dishes the right way

Eat it like a pro: Learn how to eat a host of tricky dishes the right way

Ever looked at a crab with no idea how to go about eating it? Or wondered what's the best way to gobble down sushi? Lisa Cam consults some of Hong Kong's most knowledgeable chefs to learn the straightforward way to eat things… Illustration by Jessica Li How to eat Mille-feuille You might be tempted to hack away at the cake from the top, but this destroys the structure of the entire dessert. Assistant pastry chef Gaël Moutet of the Ritz-Carlton says… 1. Don't break the pastry from the top 2. Tip the dessert on its side. 3. Using a serrated knife, cut in the direction perpendicular to the pastry.   How to eat Crab Not even sure where to begin with the spindly crustacean and tend to avoid it at all costs? Mark Kerkstra, Holy Crab's chef, says it's actually not that hard… 1. First remove all the appendages. 2. Use the shell cracker to separate the claws from the joints. 3. Cut lengthways up the leg. 4. Use a spoon to open the crab along its abdomen. 5. Enjoy the meat and fat with a spoon.   How to eat Xiao long bao You're in for some serious soft tissue damage if you throw these boiling hot babies straight into your mouth. There's more than one way to avoid this. Head chef of Crystal Jade La Mian Xiao Long Bao, Wong Yuet-ming says… Place the xiao long bao on a spoonand bite off the top. Then place some vinegar soaked ginger on top and enjoy! Xia Fei Society's 'Queen of Dim Sum' Ge Xian E. also says… Place the dumpling on the spoon, bite a hole on the side then slurp the

Listings and reviews (80)

Tri

Tri

4 out of 5 stars

Bibo and Hotshot were among the most hyped openings of the last two years. Known for the millions of dollars’ worth of contemporary art on the walls, these two establishments have made their mark as destination restaurants – at least for the art, if nothing else. Now Le Comptoir, the group behind these two eateries, is trying its hand at Asian cuisine with a newly opened Balinese restaurant, Tri, in Repulse Bay.  Although this time the concept isn’t about art, that doesn’t mean there aren’t aesthetics to appreciate. In fact, the décor is simply stunning. Each item of furniture is imported from Indonesia, and cross sections of bamboo panel the interior like a serene forest. The most striking component is the dining room-length rock pool, which supports pods that open up to house the tables. Combined with views of the coastline from the vantage point of the beach, the ambience is breathtaking.  Eventually remembering we’re here to eat, we tear away our eyes from the interior design and down to the menu. First, we plump for the common Indonesian street food duck goreng ($180), but this time it’s done with a bit of panache. The bird leg is pressed into boneless slices, then fried and served with chilli mango, cucumber and pink grapefruit, all dotted beautifully around the plate. The meat is succulent and juicy, and the condiments cut the crispy batter nicely. We’re a bit taken aback by the size of our ‘shared’ plate of scallops mesanten ($230), which only contains a paltry three

Kashiwaya

Kashiwaya

5 out of 5 stars

Even with the rise of China as a global presence, the world remains enamoured with all things Japanese, be it anime, video games or crazy cat cafés. In the 80s – the era of peak Japan fascination – even kitsch movies like The Karate Kid captured the world’s imagination, with viewers enthralled by a scene in which the protagonist’s honed dexterity is displayed as he catches a fly with his chopsticks. This Japanese spirit of perfection is exemplified in the country’s cuisine, and kaiseki in particular. Modern kaiseki refers to a seasonal multi-course meal, featuring labour-intensive preparations incorporating premium ingredients. It’s also renowned for being expensive.  One restaurant that is a prime example of this cuisine is Kashiwaya, in Osaka. Almost four decades old, the eatery has been awarded three Michelin stars for the last five years, placing it amongst the best restaurants in the world. Luckily for us, in seeking to expand, Hong Kong has been selected as the site for Kashiwaya’s overseas outpost. In charge of the kitchen is Jun Takahashi, a man with more than 20 years’ experience at the Osaka original, who trained under Hideaki Matsuo, owner and head chef of the famous establishment.  Conveniently located on On Lan Street, in the same building as Arcane and the Michelin-starred On Dining Kitchen, the main premises are small, with just a handful of tables facing a six-seat counter. Hidden from sight are three separate rooms that, we’re told, can cater for private part

Namo Avant Thai

Namo Avant Thai

4 out of 5 stars

There’s no doubt the old Tsim Sha Tsui East area is making a comeback. Since the opening of East TST’s MTR station exit almost 10 years ago, the area has undergone a slow but steady rebirth, with newly renovated malls and a marked improvement in infrastructure. Mody Road itself has stretches of malls that line the harbourside, taking advantage of the relative quiet and the stunning views of Victoria Harbour. It’s a mystery, really, that this area once fell by the wayside. But no more – this district, popular with locals, expats and tourists alike, is now on top of its game. And that’s no more obvious than with the emergence of some cracking restaurants like Eastside Tavern and the new-look Spasso. And now, Namo. In a prime location on the ground floor of the Empire Centre, this innovative Thai spot, just like East TST as a whole, aims to strip away an old image (in this case run-of-the-mill Thai cuisine) and give it a contemporary breath of fresh air. The kitchen at Namo, plugged as an ‘avant-Thai’ eatery, is well-equipped with expert staff. Michelin-starred Spanish chef Alejandro Sanchez has teamed up with chef Wijannarongk Kunchit, who has worked with stars like Bobby Chinn, to create a new type of Thai food that uses international ingredients and cooking techniques. And the place personifies this approach – clean, spacious and with great views, it’s opening a new breed of Thai cuisine up to everyone and anyone. So, the food. We start off with an aperitif of mango sticky ri

Gonpachi

Gonpachi

4 out of 5 stars

Remember that famous scene in Kill Bill, where Uma Thurman, with her back to the door, waits silently at a Japanese bar for her ninja attackers? The fight scene that ensues has gone down in cinematic history as one of Quentin Tarantino’s best pieces of work, and Gonpachi, the Tokyo restaurant where this classic scene was shot, has since been affectionately known as ‘The Kill Bill Restaurant’.  Fast forward a decade and the restaurant behemoth has opened in Hong Kong, taking up part of the space in Lee Gardens formerly occupied by Lawry’s, the Prime Rib. Walking into the restaurant, the dark wood-panelled walls, lantern lighting and temple eave decorations reminds us of walking through the streets of old Gion – the geisha district of Kyoto. However, as we take our time perusing the menu, it becomes clear that Gonpachi, like the movie that catapulted this restaurant to international fame, would serve food inspired by the traditional, yet delivered with an array of fresh new innovations.  At its heart, Gonpachi does izakaya-style food. There’s nothing mind-blowingly different about what’s on offer on the menu – skewers, noodles and plentiful side-dishes populate the list – but everything is given a slight twist. After whetting our appetites with a strong, zesty and cooling yuzu mojito ($88), our first dish – the fried shrimp dumpling ($138) – arrives, cradled in a nest of fried rice noodles. Though aesthetically pleasing, the noodles are a slight obstruction to getting to the ce

權八

權八

4 out of 5 stars

日本殿堂級權八居酒屋,一向以炭火串燒及手打蕎麥麵而享負盛名。香港分店更不惜工本精心設計通風及消防設備,排除萬難成功取得牌照以明火炭烤串燒。餐廳更採用來自日本紀州和歌山的頂級備長炭,相比起一般木炭,備長炭製作過程非常嚴謹,以先風乾再曬乾的實木經高溫蒸燒而成,質感堅實、密度高、耐燒,最高可燃燒達攝氏一千度以上,並能保持穩定高溫。除了豐富焦香的炭燒料理之外,餐廳更提供多款配搭燒物的清酒。

Braven

Braven

4 out of 5 stars

People watch different films for different reasons. Some watch romcoms to swoon over their latest celebrity crush, some seek a good drama to stimulate their heart and soul. Others gravitate to the feeling of justice in a good revenge film.There’s a simple formula with revenge flicks that transcends boundaries. Whether it’s the Bride avenging her unborn baby in Kill Bill, a gangster looking to reclaim his lost cut of a robbery in Payback, or merely killing the wrong man’s puppy in John Wick, many of these films start by establishing a protagonist and the thing they hold dear. Add to that an antagonist threatening that precious thing, a slew of subsequent badass action scenes and the job is mostly done.Stunt coordinator-turned-director, Lin Oeding’s debut feature Braven follows that perenially popular formula. The film features Jason Mamoa, aka Khal Drogo from the Game of Thrones TV series, as Joe Braven, father, lumberjack and business owner in Canada’s snowy Newfoundland. A cuddly scene fairly early on in the film establishes that nothing is more important to Braven than his wife (Jill Wagner), daughter (Sasha Rossof) and father (Stephen Lang). First tick in the box. A road accident gives a conniving co-worker – who moonlights as a drug mule – the bright idea to stash his goods in Braven’s cabin. Unwittingly, however, he leads a dangerous druglord, Kassen (Garrett Dillahunt), to our hero’s door. Kassen announces himself as a ruthless villain by bashing someone’s skull in with

Tsukiji Yamataka Seafood Market

Tsukiji Yamataka Seafood Market

3 out of 5 stars

In Tokyo, the Tsukiji fish market is a historical institution. This is a bustling wholesale spot that touts some of the best seafood in Japan and hosts tuna auctions that attract fishy fans from across the globe. It’s about to relocate in Tokyo but that doesn’t affect us as we’ve just become the proud owners of its new Hong Kong offshoot at the Wan Chai ferry pier. It’s a pretty big deal, so we’ve been waiting with anticipation for the new Tsukiji Yamataka Seafood Market. And now it’s here, selling a range of live seafood, freshly cooked dishes, fishy products and wholesale seafood which has been directly imported from Japan and other countries. The entrance to the market, in fact, shines like a beacon to wandering foodies among the chaos of construction along the Wan Chai shorefront. Yamataka is one of the most prominent wholesale distributors of fresh seafood in Japan and its team is endeavouring to bring a slice of the Tsukiji experience to us. While there aren’t any places to eat inside the Tokyo trade market, visitors usually dive into the sushi and sashimi restaurants outside the entrance to round off their experience with a full belly. In the Hong Kong version, there are a few small eateries actually inside the market. You can’t make a reservation. While you can go to Tsukiji’s Facebook page to book a time to visit – you get sent a QR code upon completion – once inside, you still have to queue. Upon entering the double doors, though, you’re met with a produce section w

Apinara

Apinara

3 out of 5 stars

Nara Thai Cuisine is a restaurant opened by female entrepreneurs in Thailand that has earned many accolades in Bangkok. Keeping the girl power theme alive, Apinara, its new Hong Kong branch, has just been launched by homegrown female restaurateur Pearl Shek, who’s also behind Central casual eatery, Isono. But what difference does a woman’s touch make to the dishes here? We’re seated in the restaurant, which is adorned with a few Thai motifs like banana leaf ceiling fans, and then we kick off with the spicy northeastern pork balls ($98), where crispy fried spheres of meat are to be eaten wrapped with lettuce. We like the hot ‘n’ spicy sour sauce that accompanies this dish, but the leaves are too rigid and small, leaving much of the husky exterior of the pork exposed. At times, the texture of the balls is so rough, it’s like licking sandpaper. Luckily, though, our dry palates are satiated by the prawn tom yum kung ($118). Served on a heated wok, this soup is a fantastic balance of sweet, sour and hot spice. The longer the soup simmers with the prawns, the better the briny seafood flavours infuse with the broth. The steamed sea bass in spicy lime sauce ($238) is not so great, however. Where the fish is meaty and fresh, the lime slices on top are merely garnish as there’s barely any citrus flavours in the spicy sauce. We do end the meal on a high note when we opt for the Thai tea pancake ($78). The triple-stacked dessert is infused with tea and the ice cream with its strong Ceylo

Bib N Hops

Bib N Hops

4 out of 5 stars

It’s been a while since we heard from Alvin Leung. The man behind three Michelin-starred Bo Innovation has been busy leading the celebrity chef life as a judge for MasterChef Canada and the host of Singapore TV’s Wok Stars. But with Bo Innovation now at home in bigger and better premises within Wan Chai’s J Senses complex, the Demon Chef has opened a new concept at the restaurant’s original location on Ship Street. Teaming up with chef Yong Soo Do, previously the senior sous chef at Jinjuu and head chef of U-Hang, Leung has crafted the menu of a casual Korean eatery that also offers fabulous drinks – hence the name, Bib N Hops. Leung has helped put Hong Kong on the map as a hub of culinary creativity, gaining fame for marrying molecular techniques to nostalgic ingredients and local food products such as Pat Chun vinegar and salted egg yolk, so we’re curious as to how he and chef Yong interpret Korean classics. We’ve always lamented the underused terrace space outside the former Bo Innovation, as a casual tipple never gelled with the well-heeled atmosphere of a Michelin-starred institution. Now, the French windows are thrown open and you’re greeted with exposed brick walls and filament light bulbs. Elsewhere, the tiled mosaic of the Demon Chef in his famous power pose is replaced by an open bar facing the terrace. On the surface, there’s nothing too extraordinary on the menu apart from a few eponymous dishes which use a signature sauce or marinade. We start with a yukhoe ($158

Deng G

Deng G

4 out of 5 stars

With a good collection of restaurants under its belt in convenient locations, Elite Concepts is one of the powerhouse dining groups in our city. Taking a small departure from prime locations such as luxury malls and hotels, the newest addition to the group’s lineup is Deng G. Situated on the second and third floor of a run-down commercial building in Wan Chai, the smart interiors of this Sichuan restaurant are in stark contrast to the exterior of the building. Chinoiserie in cool blue-grey tones dominates the dining room and, unsurprisingly, given Sichuan Province is home to 80 percent of the world’s giant pandas, a bamboo theme runs through much of the décor. Considered one of the most talented Sichuan chefs in China and currently the owner of 鄧記食園 (Deng Kee Dining) in Shanghai, chef Deng Huadong and his talented culinary team utilise fresh produce alongside multidisciplinary cooking techniques. Most importantly, they exercise restraint when it comes to using cooking oil, resulting in a more intense, cleaner experience on the palate. The menu is divided into flavour profiles instead of ingredients. On our visit these include lychee, ma la, hu la, yu xiang, ‘home’, sweet and sour, salt and pepper and dry pot. We start with a smoked fish ($80, this classic starter is usually sweet and Deng G’s version is no different in taste, but it’s a world away in terms of texture. The often saccharine and oily over-fried fish is given new life simply by the use of fresh, premium fish and

鄧記

鄧記

4 out of 5 stars

上海知名川菜館,老闆兼大廚是成都名廚鄧華東,傳統川辣菜出色,擔擔麵汁醬濃稠適中,撒上少許花生碎,香辣惹味,分量不多,兩三啖食完。

Bistro Seoul

Bistro Seoul

4 out of 5 stars

There’s still some debate about the standard of Korean food in Hong Kong. While there are various excellent fried chicken joints and many laud the authenticity of the barbecue restaurants on Kimberly Road in TST, there remains room for an authentic yet contemporary eatery catering to lovers of the peninsula’s less heralded specialities, like japchae and bibimbap. Bistro Seoul is just the latest additional to the slew of new restaurants welcoming customers along Lee Tung Avenue in Wan Chai. Warm wood tones and a visually stunning panel of Korean metal spoons along the wall lends the space an unpretentious and comfortable air.  Seated next to the window – perfect for people watching – we start our meal with a kimchi seafood pancake ($68). The plate arrives with only two small pieces for consumption but they pack a nice kimchi punch. And even though there are only tiny pieces of prawn and not much seafood in the dish, we enjoy the chewy texture and absence of bland batter in each bite. Next up is the spicy pan-fried chicken ($128), arriving on a hot plate with plenty of cabbage and sliced carrots. The sauce carries just the right amount of heat alongside tender chicken. Another solid dish. We end our meal on a sweet note with a stone pot ice cream on rice cake ($68). The combination duly arrives bubbling away in a searing hot stone pot, the caramel syrup on top of the warm rice cake melting trickling into the ice cream is an ooey gooey delight. We love the offerings at Bistro Se

News (3)

Where to buy great food product this holiday season

Where to buy great food product this holiday season

Sitting on Hennessey Road is a tasting lounge that’s unique, classy, offers a wide range of unique products and delicious food. The space is decked out with leather couches, dark wooden book shelves displaying unique products, and wine glasses as décor in an atmosphere that exudes elegance. The venue, available for private functions, is suitable for sophisticated celebrations or even intimate family functions. Members of the Antico family who have been trading fresh produce since 1938 started the Emporio Antico brand.  Matthew Antico who has been based in Asia for over a decade runs the Hong Kong lounge; he has a tremendous amount of experience and passion for the culinary arts and is well known among chef and restaurant owners. The iconic Australian family has carefully curated a line of fine foods that it sells at the lounge.   It sources a large variety of goods from Australia and has an extensive range of Tasmaian products including; rare bush pepperberries, high quality gourmet hot sauce, jams, mustards, relishes and classic dessert sauces. Additionally, the lounge also sells fresh truffles from Europe and Australia, fresh caviar that’s produced without any preservatives or pasteurization, the highest grade Saffron, vintage balsamic vinegars from Italy and pure cherry juice that comes straight from the Antico family farm in Australia. The farm operates as the wholesale arm of Emporio Antico and delivers fine foods to leading 5-star hotels, casinos and Michelin-rated res

What's it like to swing in Hong Kong (and why do so many couples do it)?

What's it like to swing in Hong Kong (and why do so many couples do it)?

Swinging, wife-swapping, partner-sharing, trading and lending. Whatever you call it, it’s a sexual practice that’s been happening in Hong Kong for years. Lisa Cam lifts the veil and takes a peek into this secretive community… Mention the word ‘swinging’ to anyone in Hong Kong and all fingers start pointing towards Discovery Bay. Rumours of strategically placed umbrella stands and Fairy brand detergents on window sills have been doing the rounds since the 1970s. But, these days, they are just that. Urban myths. However, just because swinging isn’t concentrated in one community doesn’t mean it isn’t happening in our city. According to a 2005 study by the USA’s Kinsey Institute, it’s estimated that two to four percent of all the married couples in North America indulge in a bit of partner-swapping. But, in the absence of any similar study in Hong Kong, our local scene remains a mystery. However, say it was two to four percent here, too. That would mean there are at least 40,000 to 80,000 couples engaged in swinging at any given time. That’s a lot of swapping. And it could be true, as our own research finds. What leads a couple to find another person or couple and have sex with them? How do they strike up an agreement? Let’s face it, surely the main factor is that after shagging the same person for years, sex can become stale. Pepping up the fun with someone different can be one of the ways to improve your sex life. In a 2005 global survey, it was found that 35 to 44-year-olds ha

Hooters Hong Kong is open! Bring your wife, bring your kids!

Hooters Hong Kong is open! Bring your wife, bring your kids!

With an announcement in 2015 that Hooters is opening up 30 outlets in Southeast Asia in six years, Hong Kong was one of the most excited cities to receive the news. At the helm of Hong's Kong's first branch of the iconic American bar is General Manager Mike Warde, no stranger to our fair city. Brought up in Hong Kong, Warde has lived here since the age of 17. Working his way up from the bottom at iconic Hong Kong establishments such as Joe Bananas, Dog House and Shamrocks, Warde got the call 18 months ago to help with opening Hooters in Asia. After successful launches in Thailand and China, he’s back in his hometown to open up the 15th Asian branch. The hoarding came down today to unveil this one-of-a-kind 'family' sports bar in Hong Kong, and Warde says we should bring our kids… So Mike, for the uninitiated, what is the Hooters concept?We're a fun-loving entertainment sports bar with great chicken wings. Our icon is our girls. We don’t just employ girls, we employ boys as well. I don’t expect the Hooter girls to be carrying around cans of beer, or cases of beer – this is boys' business. There are Hooter boys?There’re a lot of Hooter Boys. There are Hooter Boy Teams. They’re security for the bar, bar supervisors, there are barmen behind the bar too. The concept is that the Hooter girls serve the customers, come and chat with you and give you all the information you need and then, there’s the Hooters dance. Every 45 minutes they do a choreographed dance, and there are 12 in to