0 Love It
Save it

Outlook Festival

Your essential guide to Outlook Festival, with exclusive interviews, reviews, competitions, local area guides and more...

© Outlook Festival
Outlook festival playlist by DJ Jack Sparrow
Music

Outlook festival playlist by DJ Jack Sparrow

Leeds based DJ Ryan Wild, aka Jack Sparrow, plays crunked-up techno and soundsystem dubstep to appreciative crowds at Outlook Festival. As a fully-fledged member of the Outlook family, he's put together an exclusive playlist for Time Out Croatia, showcasing the best of the festival's past and present. RECOMMENDED: More Croatia music festivals

The roots of UK soundsystem culture
Music

The roots of UK soundsystem culture

In 1954, ‘Duke’ Vincent Forbes stowed away in a boat from Kingston, Jamaica, looking for a better life in London. He left behind family, friends – and, in the ghettos of his hometown, an emerging musical culture centred not on live performers but on massive amplified soundsystems. Within a year, a homesick Duke Vin had built his first system from cheap parts and a second hand turntable. 
A fire was lit: Caribbean soundsystem culture had arrived in the UK and the ways we made, played and raved to music was changed for ever. Over the decades that followed, British systems such as Jah Shaka, Sir Coxsone, Aba-Shanti-I and Channel One would become regarded as some of the best in the world. They imbued generations with a bass-centric musical ideology that would go on to influence almost all UK music and become an integral force in the genesis of homegrown genres like jungle, garage and grime. Simply put, soundsystem culture matters, and the sixtieth anniversary of its arrival on UK shores is a moment to celebrate and savour. Channel One was established in 1979 in east London. They played Notting Hill Carnival for the first time in 1983 and have been a fixture there ever since. Now comprising selector Mikey Dread and MC Ras Kayleb, the duo and their monstrous system of speakers and amps play roots rock reggae music across the globe and at their two regular London dances at Village Underground and Tooting Tram & Social. Ahead of their appearances at Soundwave and Outlook festival

Akala: five songs which shaped hip hop
Music

Akala: five songs which shaped hip hop

‘A lot of documentaries start the story in 1970, as if a cultural accident happened,’ said a bemused Akala, when he was explaining the evolution of MC-ing in Salford last year. ‘Let’s not pretend there was no foundation to this art.’ In his ‘Hip Hop History’ show, the rapper, poet and director of The Hip Hop Shakespeare Company illustrates the development of hip hop in easily digestible and quick-witted chunks.Born Kingslee Daley in Camden, Akala delves into the history of the genre in a lecture full of theatrics. There are bursts of rap, live music, videos and slides as the 29-year-old polymath takes the audience on a 3,000-year journey through time that starts with the griots in West Africa: musical storytellers who were able to recite five-hour-long poems from memory. Follow his leap forward to unexpected wordsmiths Muhammad Ali and Ella Fitzgerald, and you’ll find Akala opening your eyes to a genre you thought you already knew everything about.We asked Akala to name five tracks which, in his opinion, had charted the course of hip hop history. Here they are, from Gil Scott-Heron in ’71 to Biggie in ’94…

Outlook and Dimensions: Interview with founder Joe Barnett
Music

Outlook and Dimensions: Interview with founder Joe Barnett

A relative newcomer to the festival circuit, Dimensions has already established itself as a major player in the international dance music scene. This year's line-up, including funk legend George Clinton, electronica-trailblazers Four Tet and fresh talent Little Dragon, looks cert to confidently entertain the thousands of revellers who flock to the historic site of Fort Punta Christo. In the same month, it's older brother Outlook will also be holding the fort. With a penchant for reggae, bass and breaks, the selection criteria is concerned with artists who have a well-earned rep for making crowds go crazy (this year's line-up, including SBTRKT, Jurassic 5 and Kate Tempest is testament to it's creative approach to curation) Time Out speaks with the man who started it all, Joe Barnett, to discuss the history of music festivals in Croatia - and, more importantly - what the future holds. Firstly, Why Croatia? The catalyst for the festival in the first year, 2008, was the offer from the team behind the Garden Festival to join them and utilise the site in Petrčane. We knew what they were doing out in Croatia at the time and the potential seemed enormous for more UK-organised events to take place in Croatia. We haven’t looked back since. What are the pros and cons of holding a festival in Croatia? Organising a festival in another country was never going to be the easiest challenge to take on. There are certainly times that I long for a UK green-field site for the simplicity of d

Heading to Pula?

Pula area guide
Travel

Pula area guide

Things to do in Pula
Things to do

Things to do in Pula

The must-see attraction is, of course, Pula’s amphitheatre. Set a short walk north of the city centre, its outer walls are remarkably preserved, and a wonderful backdrop for the concerts that take place here. You get a sense of the gladiatorial contests held here until AD 400, particularly when you go down to the corridors on the sea-facing side where the lions were kept. Through a long tunnel lined with Roman masonry, you’ll now find a few displays about olive oil production and a rather detailed map of Via Flavia, which connected Pula with Trieste. Outside is a modest souvenir shop with the same opening hours as the arena. The second of the Roman attractions stands at the south-east entrance to the town centre. The Arch of the Sergians, or Golden Gate, was built in 30 BC. Its most notable aspects are the reliefs of grapes and winged victories on the inner façade. Passing through the arch and past the statue of James Joyce, marking where the author taught in 1904-05, you walk down the Roman-era high street, the Sergijevaca. It leads to the heart of Pula, the Roman Forum, Temple of Augustus and nearby mosaic. The Forum, still the main square, is today lined with cafés, the Town Hall, tourist office and, lining the far side, the six classical Corinthian columns of the Temple of Augustus. Inside is a modest collection of Roman finds. The floor mosaic, hidden away behind a carpark, dates to the second century AD and has geometric motifs as well as a depiction of the Punishment

Pula beaches
Things to do

Pula beaches

Central Pula has no beaches itself but it does not take long to reach some pleasant spots of coastline. The nearest ones at Stoja and along Lungomare between Veruda and Valsaline are adequate, but if you’re having to take a city bus (Nos.1 and 4 respectively) to get there, you may as well take the Nos.2A and 3A to Verudela, its nicer shingle beaches and best-in-town lunches. If you’ve come for a beach holiday, leave Pula for Medulin and the windsurfing centre of Premantura, both a quick and regular bus journey from Pula, on the Nos.25 and 26 respectively. Beyond Premantura is the beautiful Kamenjak peninsula, at the very southern tip of Istria. Another option is Fratarsko island. In summer locals decamp here permanently, spending nights under canvas among the shady pines and commuting to the city by ferry. There are free showers there, too. Ferries from Bunarina, heaving with sun worshippers for the ten-minute crossing, run every 20 minutes or so in the height of summer. Fares are nominal. The major excursion for tourists from the town of Pula is to the attractive and somewhat bonkers Brijuni Islands.

Great Pula restaurants
Restaurants

Great Pula restaurants

Downtown Pula has a handful of reasonable restaurants; those on the outskirts, in Verudela and Stoja, also offer a sea view. In town, Amfiteatar and Vodnjanka come recommended, as does Ribarska Koliba, a favourite among fish-eating locals.

Pula bars and café guide
Nightlife

Pula bars and café guide

Pula’s many good bars, cafés and nightspots are not always in prominent locations. P14 and Scandal Express are classic downtown bars the discerning first-time visitor would never find – but would be delighted once they do. Towards Verudela, where Budučinova and Tomasinijeva meet, is a hub of terrace venues.

Pula nightlife guide
Nightlife

Pula nightlife guide

For mainstream clubbing, arrange for the taxi driver to head north-east of the centre. The best venue there is Aruba, with a bar outdoors and crowded two-room disco inside. The Zen Club is similarly funky if quite mainstream, although admission is free. Heading south of the centre towards the hotel zone of the Verudela peninsula, the summer-only beach bar and restaurant Ambrela was renovated in 2009 and invites DJs to thump out house, hip hop and techno while punters enjoy the terrace view over a stony beach. Club Uljanik  right in the city centre has been going since the ’60s and still boasts a strong year-round roster of alternative bands and DJ nights, and opens up a big outdoor terrace in summer. Indy gigs and alternative club nights also take place in the basement of the Rojc Centre, although you should check the schedule before making tracks. Habsburg-era navel forts count among Pula’s most compelling nightlife destinations: Fort Bourguignon near Valsaline Bay hosts regular summer DJ events; while Fort Punta Christo, north along the coast, is the site of the Outlook and Dimensions festivals, and the seasonal Seasplash Summer Club

Pula hotel and accommodation guide
Hotels

Pula hotel and accommodation guide

Downtown Pula has a handful of mostly rather modest hotels. The classy options are all 5km south of town in Verudela, which is accessible by bus Nos.2A and 3A, or with a 60kn taxi ride. Here the four-star Park Plaza Histria Pula, three-star Palma and a clutch of other resort hotels are run by local tourism concern Arenaturist For a more intimate stay, boutique B&B Valsabbion lies across the bay in Pješčana Uvala.

Comments

0 comments