Time Out interviews...

Time Out speaks to the biggest international names and emerging local talent here in Israel

Comedy, dance & theater interviews

Jim Gaffigan: "Bacon may be the answer to peace in the Middle East"
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Jim Gaffigan: "Bacon may be the answer to peace in the Middle East"

Why? Sadly, due to his wife's illness, Jim Gaffigan has decided to cancel his Tel Aviv show along with his entire tour. He did promise to try and come back as soon as possible though. We wish him and his wife all the best. Last month, we had the pleasure of interviewing the comedian...to stay in good spirits here are the results:   Jim Gaffigan, the man who gave hot pockets their fame, has booked a flight to Israel as a part of his ‘Fully Dressed’ world tour this June. The American comedian finds his inspiration in food, fatherhood, Netflix, and well, food. We picked the brains of a true bacon believer about his exercise regiments, Israeli food preferences, children and preferred prison posse (hopefully these last two are not synonymous).   courtesy of TV Land   Is this your first visit to Israel?   Jim Gaffigan: No, I was there in 2010. I’m excited to head back.   Are you worried about the lack of bacon in the Middle East? Jim Gaffigan: Oh that is everyone’s concern. No, actually last time I was in Israel I had some bacon that was quite good at some Scottish Hotel. Bacon may be the answer to peace in the Middle East.   Have you looked into border laws on bringing bacon in your carry-on? Jim Gaffigan: Of course! That was the first thing I did.   What is your favorite exercise regiment and why? Jim Gaffigan: Watching Netflix, that way I can wake up exhausted.   Are you bringing your children to Israel? Or is there not enough sunscreen in the Universe (a

Honoring tradition: an interview with choreographer Jessica Lang
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Honoring tradition: an interview with choreographer Jessica Lang

The New York-based company dedicated to creating and performing the works of Julliard-trained choreographer Jessica Lang will immerse Israeli audiences in the beauty of movement and music this April. The revolutionary choreographer seamlessly transforms classical ballet into artful craft, taking audiences on an emotional journey through Bach, Ciupinski, Beethoven and more. Time Out got to know the woman behind the company and her role as a choreographer in the dance community.   Who is your greatest influence as a choreographer?    The world around me influences my choreography. I am inspired by my company dancers and all they can express and say through the movement and images I make. American choreographer Mark Morris also inspires me to be better at my art and I am inspired by who he is, how he makes a difference in our field and in the communities where his company visits as well as locally in Brooklyn.   What is the performance you are most proud of?    There are many special performances that make me proud. I can't pick one. The perfect performance doesn't exist, but there are moments that make me stop and say, "I achieved something with this work. The process was good, the collaborators were great and the performance was what I had hoped for." But, I am also proud of every performance - we are living our mission to immerse audiences in the beauty of movement and music and any time we do that I am proud.   Where do you find your inspiration?   The inspirati

Local comedian Yossi Tarablus shares insight on Brian Regan's upcoming 'Comedy for Koby' Israel tour
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Local comedian Yossi Tarablus shares insight on Brian Regan's upcoming 'Comedy for Koby' Israel tour

With Comedy for Koby heading on its Israel tour yet again, this time featuring the hilarious American comedian, Brian Regan, we thought we'd head to the local stand-up community and ask a veteran Israeli comic his reactions to the rising international influx. Here's what comedian Yossi Tarablus had to say:     Who are your favorite international comedians? Chris Rock, Louis CK , Dave Attel, Jim Gaffigan, and Regan of course.   Tell me a joke... I recently got a very high electricity bill, so I'm teaching my kids to read Braille.    How would you describe the local comedy scene in Israel? We have four comedy clubs in Israel that function during the weekends and most of the week – three in Tel Aviv and one in Jerusalem. We have many comedy nights scattered all over the country and recently in the last four years, we have introduced English comedy nights as well. The scene is evolving rapidly and today, you are able to perform in English almost every day.   My home club is the Z0A comedy bar. I think it's the best place to perform in the country and I have been performing there for the last 10 years. We have very good comedians in this country and I think that the fact that a lot of them are doing very well in their English acts as well just goes to show you how funny they are. We have a lot of original thinkers and comedians who are very avant-garde like Lioz Shem Tov and Daniel Chen, pushing stand-up beyond the known boundaries.    Have you performed abroad as we

Vanity mirror: an interview with Stefano Poda, opera director
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Vanity mirror: an interview with Stefano Poda, opera director

Stefano Poda conquers direction, choreography, set, lighting & costume design when translating his operatic interpretations to the stage. The Italian virtuoso has already mastered Wagner, Puccini and Verdi worldwide, and now, he's finally pairing up with the Israeli Opera for a special coproduction of Goethe's Faust. We went backstage with the man behind the magic to find out more about the dramatic performance on stage this month.     © PR       From Andrea Chenierin Seoul to Othello in Budapest, you're quite well-traveled. Do you have a favorite place in which you have directed? Not at all. It’s like being a mother. Your last child is always your favorite. In Opera, your very last creature is the one you love the most.   Have you directed in Israel before? This is my first time here and I already feel a beautiful energy.     Do you play any instruments? I'm not a musician, but have listened to music my whole life. The Magic Flute was my lullaby. I believe that music is the soul of a person. There can be no body without a soul, so my relationship with the conductor is vital.   And how was working with conductor Dan Ettinger? Incredible. Our chemistry was good from the moment we met. I am uniquely responsible for taking five individual aspects (direction, choreography, aesthetics, lighting & costume design) and creating a synthesis in the final product. Dan immediately understood this cohesion and translated it to his music.        

Interview with the Batsheva Company: on dance and Naharin's new show 'Venezuela'
Dance

Interview with the Batsheva Company: on dance and Naharin's new show 'Venezuela'

After taking a brief break from choreographing new works, prominent Israeli artistic director Ohad Naharin has crafted a brand new piece for the Batsheva Dance Company, to premiere this month in Neve Tzedek. As with many of Naharin’s gems, details are kept to a minimum to increase the audience’s anticipation and heighten the live experience. What audiences can expect from Venezuela is a complex dialogue between the dancers’ movement and the symbolic material – one that is exciting, unknown, and beautiful. We sat down with six of the company’s dancers from all over the world to get to know a little more about their personalities and their experience with the top Israeli dance company in Tel Aviv, while gaining insight into their upcoming performances. 

Artist interviews

Artists, unite! An interview with Guy Moses on his Moses Project
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Artists, unite! An interview with Guy Moses on his Moses Project

Uber-creative local music producer, Guy Moses, is making magic by unifying Israel’s artistic community in a large-scale project combining musicians, performers and stage crafts in an all-encompassing performance to engage all your senses    Introduce us to the Moses Project:   I am a musician. I have played guitar since I was a child and, in recent years, have been in production. I really love working with other artists, and have been collaborating with many Israeli artists in the studio. I understood that the music I was making was asking for visual representation. I realized I wanted it to be more than just music on stage, but a universe that we create around us. The music is like a play, it tells the emotional and dynamic story. Then I think of what other elements can enhance the music. The songs are all very different, and contribute to creating a magical world.    Sing us a song:   Each song is an exposition, a process that results in an explosion. My songs focus on a certain feeling, flaw or conflict. A sort of vulnerability. I deal with perfection a lot; what is it in mine/your/the collective’s definition? Is a flaw a part of perfection? Is perfection something that we can give an identity to?    Tell us a tale:   I have so many stories. Something unique about the Moses Project is that we have two drummers, both spectacular at what they do. They are both good friends of mine and so talented, so I put their sounds together. It is amazing watching the dynamic

Genius of 'Genesis': an interview with Michel Platnic, artist of the newest exhibition at Gordon Gallery
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Genius of 'Genesis': an interview with Michel Platnic, artist of the newest exhibition at Gordon Gallery

Another month, another fantastic international exhibition at the New Gordon Gallery. We asked Michel Platnic, the electrical-engineer-turned-artist, about his truly special multimedia project entitled ‘Genesis.'   Where are you from? I was born in France, I moved to Israel in 1998 and I have been living mostly in Berlin for the last 3 years.   Is this your first project with Gordon Gallery? No, I have been working with Gordon Gallery for 4 years already. My last solo exhibition was 3 years ago, just before I left for Berlin.   How did the transition from electrical engineer to artist come to be? I worked in high-tech as an engineer both in France and Israel. While I loved my job, something was missing. I needed to fully believe in what I was doing, and this was not the case. When I moved to Israel, the idea that I need to live in the present, as fully as I can, became stronger. I wanted to live by the ‘regret nothing’ mentality. I explored many fields almost daily from dancing to acting, performance, and sculpture. The more I studied and explored, the more I was attracted to art. It took me 7 years from the moment I started my journey to the moment I completely stopped working in high-tech, but it was worth it.   Did you find any common threads between the two avocations? Planning how to construct what was inside my imagination as well as working with people are abilities I rely on nearly everyday when creating my art…these were skills I developed when working in

Inked in legacy: an interview with Wassim Razzouk, Coptic tattoo artist
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Inked in legacy: an interview with Wassim Razzouk, Coptic tattoo artist

  Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem has rarely seen a quiet day in its 479-year history. Just past its magnificent gate towers and opposite the even grander Tower of David, the road is lined with shops serving delicious local falafel and shawarma, Christian, Jewish and Muslim memorabilia, and quaint coffee shops that welcome both tourists and locals alike, who are either prepping for the wonders of the Old City ahead, or stopping for a well-deserved, restful moment after completing their culturally-rich adventure. Nestled in the Old City’s maze is an extraordinary gem that, instead of receiving great attention from passersby, is popular amongst a more specific crowd – Christian pilgrims searching not only for churches, but for tattoos, and specifically, the almost overwhelming emotional feelings that accompany the experience. Situated on a quiet road, connecting Jaffa Gate to the rest of the Christian Quarter, is ‘Razzouk Tattoo’.   Inside works a man named Wassim Razzouk, who is the twenty-seventh generation of his family to continue an extraordinary tradition – tattooing Coptic Christian pilgrims. Today, the range of visitors is diverse. When I arrive, Wassim is getting ready to tattoo a young woman from Los Angeles, who was advised by a friend back in the United States to visit Wassim. After gazing with utter fascination through his collection of past tattoos, in the workshop that his father and grandfather had tattooed in before him, Wassim and I sit down and I begin to ask him all

Photo Op: an interview with local cameraman Asaf Liberfrund
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Photo Op: an interview with local cameraman Asaf Liberfrund

From the prolific work of Bill Cunningham, who shot street style for the New York Times for almost four decades, to Scott Shuman (aka 'The Sartorialist') who spurred a whole new generation of street style photographers, bloggers, and Instagrammers with his modern-day takes on fashion, technology, and parlaying it into a lucrative career of his own brand, street style has undergone an upheaval in the last 10 years – initiating not only a disruption to the fashion world, but also colliding with it and manifesting a new style reality.  A well done street shot for a virtually unknown photographer (and/or subject) has the ability to go viral and launch careers, fashion campaigns, and inspire a massive, obsessive community of online fashion lovers/shoppers to buy one single accessory, or a whole lot more, a million times over. The power of street photography is paramount and our 31-year-old local darling, Asaf Liberfrund, of the popular blog TheStreetVibe.co, has made it his mission to not only to showcase global fashion, but also uncover how world trends connect people and how cultural baggage creates personal style in the ever-evolving  bubble of fashion.   © PR         How did you get started as a fashion photographer? One day I took a pocket camera from a friend and began shooting. I immediately felt it was the right and important thing to do in the world, and I still feel that way.    What do you shoot with? I change cameras frequently. Right now, it's a Can

Music interviews

Retracing her roots: an interview with AvevA, Ethiopian-Israeli singer
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Retracing her roots: an interview with AvevA, Ethiopian-Israeli singer

While Israel has a huge pool of musical talent, once in a while, a truly unique voice comes along that needs to be heard by everyone. Ethio-Israeli singer-songwriter AvevA Dese is that voice. She brings her own cultural flare to the table with her "Afro-Soul" style: a mix of powerful texts (in both English and Amharic) and traditional Ethiopian sounds.   Back from her North America tour, we sat down to ask AvevA a few questions.   How old were you when you first started singing & songwriting? I’ve loved singing since I can remember, but the writing came a little after, around the age of 14.The first time I sang in front of people on stage was when I was 12 years old.   Do you play any other instruments? I play the guitar. It’s the instrument I use when composing my songs.   Did you always know you wanted to be a singer? Yes. I always wanted to be a singer, but I didn’t believe it could happen until today.   What genre of music did you listen to growing up? I used to listen to a lot of soul music and R&B. Those were my favorites at the time.   Is anyone else in your family musical? No one in my close family is, but my aunt and uncle both used to sing in Ethiopia.   Tell me a little about your Ethiopian roots. My parents made Aliyah during the famine of 1984, after being airlifted to Israel as a part of Operation Moses. Their journey began with a long 3-week trek all the way from Ethiopia to a refugee camp in Sudan. © Harel Dahari       Who are you

Go Gogol-Bordello! – an interview with frontman Eugene Hütz
Music

Go Gogol-Bordello! – an interview with frontman Eugene Hütz

“Anybody can write when they have inspiration, but can you deliver the craft when you have no inspiration?” Eugene Hütz asks me over the phone from New York City. Cut through the troubadour’s thick, jangly accent and loose-lipped swear-a-thon, and it’s clear that the Gogol Bordello frontman has found a new path. Though the band’s last few years have been spent touring the world - “everywhere and anywhere at the same time” - Hütz believes they’ve defied gravity and come out the other side ready for more. Their funkified plump beat sounds like the dancing glow of a million desert festival bonfires, and with two upcoming shows in June, Hütz talks to us about their new multi-ethnic album.  Where are you at the moment?  I’m in New York City, where I live. I was in Brazil for almost seven years, but I moved back here a year ago. I just had to get more “New York sh*t” done. [Laughs] Enlighten me…what is “New York sh*t?”  The sh*t that you can do only in New York. I love Brazil, that will never go away, but once I moved here I found a lot of understanding and resonance. I was not a downright outcast; I became an outcast with potential. It’s a place that allows good ideas to flourish. I realize that the city needs us.  This month you’ll be performing in Israel not once, but twice. Is it because of the amount of fans you have here? We do have a strong grassroots following. So many years of touring has helped the band click with audiences easier. Tel Aviv sort of reminds me of my

Jacob Collier: "Stevie Wonder is my ultimate musical crush"
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Jacob Collier: "Stevie Wonder is my ultimate musical crush"

Not only is he a YouTube sensation, two-time Grammy award winner, multi-instrumentalist, jazz theory & harmony wizard, and all around musical genius, but he’s only 22-years-old. With Jacob Collier’s unique one-man show coming to The Barby in Tel Aviv next week, we spoke with the British superhero about his “orchestral, energetic bundle of eclectic musical joy.”   What was the first instrument you ever picked up? Well, I didn’t have many lessons as a kid – only singing, so I sang first and then all the other instruments just fell into place. I was such an adventurous kid and I loved to explore all these different sounds. Music is like cooking for me: you mix the ingredients together in one big pan and see how they end up. Through experimenting, you find what you really like and stick with it.   What style of singing were you taught? I had classical singing lessons, which was really fantastic because it gave me a solid technical foundation to approach all the other genres later on like jazz and funk. But then again, I was also listening to a ton of Stevie Wonder and Bobby McFerrin at the time, so the two came together in my head.   What was your mother’s role (as a classical violinist) in your musical upbringing? My mother was this force of nature when it came to both communication with people and the whole of learning music. She’s a champion. Still to this day, she challenges me. Whenever we play together, there’s this immensely special thing that happens. I’m blessed

Simply Cyrus: an interview with jazz pianist Cyrus Chestnut
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Simply Cyrus: an interview with jazz pianist Cyrus Chestnut

Cyrus Chestnut brings a touch of Elvis to Israel’s Hot Jazz Series this March.   Some call him the second coming to Oscar Peterson, others, the next McCoy Tyner. While American jazz pianist Cyrus Chestnut finds these comparisons flattering, he offers his own response: “Only McCoy Tyner can play McCoy Tyner, only Oscar Peterson can play Oscar Peterson, only Art Tatum can tell the story of Art Tatum. I am inspired by these people, but I would never try to be them.”   “As a musician,” Chestnut pauses, “you need to find out who you are. That’s the root of jazz.”   While arguably the best jazz pianist of his generation, much like Peterson, Chestnut’s roots trail back much further than jazz, to gospel.   “I started playing piano at the age of three,” Chestnut shares. “My father was an organist for the local church in Baltimore, where I grew up. One day, I saw him playing the piano, so I got up and tried to do what he did.”   Oddly enough, the jazz pianist’s first gig was on the drums at his middle school dance. Despite fiddling with the flute and a short bout with the saxophone, Chestnut’s first and foremost passion was for the ivories…and spirituality.   © Andrea Canter       From a young age, music and religion were one in the same for Chestnut – a part of his DNA. “Music comes from a higher power," he explains, "whether that power be called Jahova, Yahweh or God.”   Gospel lived on inside the soulful pianist, even upon discovering jazz in a five and dim

Wheel of fortune - Q&A with the four founders of Fortuna Records, Israel's boutique record label
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Wheel of fortune - Q&A with the four founders of Fortuna Records, Israel's boutique record label

There’s exultant and exuberant mysticism in Middle Eastern sounds. Rhythm guitar, funky bass and keyboards bounce off the walls, illuminated by complex electronic layers pealing out over acoustic percussion and crisp instrumentation. For Israel’s boutique record label Fortuna Records, their goal is the sound, their hearts firmly fixed in harnessing it.  Above all else,  the four founders of Fortuna are record-loving obsessives, music aficionados who champion the forgotten artists of Israel by bringing them into the 21st century.  The local industry is an overflowing, endless well of talent that the label and DJ crew use to champion obscure sounds by releasing a string of vinyl reissues while simultaneously also throwing wildly wicked parties. For those otherwise unfamiliar with the notorious Fortuna Records, it’s comprised of booking agent Zack Bar, distribution manager Yoav Magriso, graphic designer Maor Anava and copy-writer and sound engineer Ariel Tagar. They let us in on the benefits of working in a team and the magic behind obscure Middle Eastern grooves.   © Ariel Efron       When you first founded Fortuna Records, what was missing in the industry at the time - what gap did you want to fill?    Zack Bar: There wasn’t exactly a gap we had to fill, but something that was important to spotlight as part of our history. A lot of great music was recorded throughout the years, a magical blend of culture, we are privileged.    Yoav Magriso: We’re all d

Just Jazzy: an interview with Avishai Cohen
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Just Jazzy: an interview with Avishai Cohen

With the 2nd International Jerusalem Jazz Festival just around the corner, we sat down with jazz trumpeter and artistic director of the festival, Avishai Cohen, to learn more about the event and the Israeli sensation that helped make the three-day music extravaganze happen:   How did the Jerusalem Jazz festival come to be?   Avishai: The festival evolved from the creative collaboration of a few initiatives – the main being the Israel festival, joined by the Yellow Submarine and the Israel Museum. They all had a similar notion in mind of promoting culture. When they approached me to direct it, of course I said yes. And from there on in, it grew and grew and grew as we found a great location and talented musicians to fill it.   Speaking of location, a Jazz festival inside a museum is quite out of the ordinary. How do you find this set-up affects the music produced?   Avishai: I think there is something truly special about creating music within another artistic space. The museum creates a unique experience that you cannot get anywhere else. I’ve played many festivals all over the world, but playing in a place that is already filled with art and inspiration for you to play off of is one-of-a-kind. In any concert, you have to bring all the vibes with you, and in this case, you have to make those vibes fit with the gallery, while being sensitive to the artist and surrounding art. It’s a challenge to be attuned to what’s going on in the specific gallery you play in and how

Get in character with...

Get in character: Ivri Lider
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Get in character: Ivri Lider

Ivri Lider: musician & composer   One of the biggest-selling contemporary musicians in Israeli music and a judge on the Israeli version of The X Factor, 42-year old Ivri Lider is a multi-tasking composer, singer and producer who has been rocking Israeli radio stations for almost two decades. His constant slew of innovative musical collaborations and evolving sound keep him at the top of the charts.  © PR   Who is your greatest musical inspiration? That’s a very hard question to answer. I’ve been playing and writing such different styles of music over these past years and in each one I had artists that were huge inspirations on me. From Bach to Keith Jarrett to Brian Eno. My latest inspiration is the super talented Ofer Meiri, who I wrote and produced my new album with.  Crazy moment from The X Factor?  A show like The X Factor is full of funny, exciting moments. Every time there is a special character (like Benny from season 2) and it’s always interesting and fun. Of course, when you come across a huge talent, it’s very exciting because this is what it’s all about. © Ronen Akerman   What do you do when you’re not making music?  Photography and sports. I am either taking or editing pictures or cycling, swimming or running because I do triathlons.Working alone vs. music collaborations...  All my life I have been a solo artist and at its core it can be a lonely place. Having said that, it’s great when you find another artist you can connect with and feel com

Get in character with Sigal Avin
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Get in character with Sigal Avin

Sigal Avin, screenwriter & director Featured on Variety’s list of ‘10 TV Scribes to Watch’, Avin is best known for the comedy  show “Irreversible” (Bilti-Hafich), the web series “It’s Harrasment” (Ze-Matrid) and the theater show “Freaks”.   How is working in Israel vs. Hollywood? The main difference is money. And when too much money is involved there are too many voices, and then it’s more of a struggle staying true to yourself. The money for one American pilot is usually enough for about 2 or 3 seasons of an Israeli TV series!   What are important issues you think should be discussed in film and TV?  The occupation as well as masturbation. If you have something honest to say and it’s brought from a different  angle than what we’ve seen before, it should be discussed.    What are you working on now?  I’m developing a TV show with Pretty Matches Productions in NY and working on a new TV show in Israel as well.  And I am also working on a feature film.  If you weren’t a writer and a director, you would be... A dancer.   © Gabriel Baharlia         The best film you’ve seen lately?  In between (Lo Po, Lo Sham) - A very strong, important film by Maslyn Hamud.   The best TV show you saw lately? I’ve just completed season 5 and 6 of “Game of Thrones”. They were remarkable and I’m ready for season 7.   The best album you’ve listened to lately? I’ve been listening to the “La La Land” soundtrack on repeat. My girls love it as well. With a croissant and co

Get in character with Maira Kalman
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Get in character with Maira Kalman

Maira Kalman, Author & Artist, 67 A woman of many talents, Tel Aviv-born, New York-based multidisciplinary artist and writer Maira Kalman continues to delight audiences with a host of new work. We sat down with her on her most recent trip to Tel Aviv, a two-week adventure riddled with preparations for upcoming projects - including an exhibit on dogs at the Israel Museum in June and a collaboration with Israeli writer Etgar Keret for the artist-in-residency program at Mishkenot Sha’ananim. Packed between a trip to the Dead Sea, dinner at Florentine’s Halutzim 3, catching Oum Kalthoum: A Musical at Jaffa’s Arab-Hebrew Theatre and buying Japanese socks at Hibino, Kalman let us pick her fanciful brain.    © Maira Kalman         What do you realize being away from home? That I love going away and I love coming back home.   Best kept secret in NYC? Central Park.   Describe Tel Aviv to someone who has never been here… NYC on the Mediterranean.   Favorite Israeli street food: Going with sabich.    What was the last film you watched? Funny Face.   What was the last gift you gave someone? Robert Walser’s The Walk.   The last gift you received? Moss from Montana.   First and last things you do every day? First thing. Have a cup of coffee with the obits. Last thing. Watch a murder mystery on T.V. Read a few pages of Proust.   The difference between men and women? If I said that women think more than men, would that be sexist? There is something to b

Get in character with Ruth Dayan & Sharon Tal (of Maskit)
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Get in character with Ruth Dayan & Sharon Tal (of Maskit)

Ruth Dayan - First lady of fashion Sharon Tal - Head designer, Maskit   Ruth Dayan, the legendary centenarian who helmed one of Israel’s most storied fashion houses, Maskit, has paired up with Sharon Tal, a 35-year-old fashion doyenne who learned from both prolific designers Alber Elbaz and Alexander McQueen, to restore Maskit to its former glory. We picked the brains of the unlikely pair. What do you think of fashion today as opposed to when you first started Maskit?  Ruth Dayan: Well, I don’t consider myself a fashion expert anymore, but I love what I see Sharon doing with the new Maskit – the embroideries, the quality, and the colors. What is one thing Ruth has told you that you carry with you in design, or life in general? Sharon Tal: To stay true to high quality and unique design and never give up.   What has been your favorite era of fashion and why?   Sharon Tal: The 20th century. It was the time that women started wearing more feminine and relaxed apparel and clothes were decoratively embroidered.   Which public figure’s style do you admire most? And which item by Maskit would you dress her in?  Sharon Tal: Natalie Portman - she is classic and timeless, but at the same time relevant and modern...I would dress her in one of our embroidered gowns and an iconic Maskit coat on top.   What is one thing you do everyday - without fail?  Ruth Dayan: Read the newspaper!   © Maskit Archive       What is your most prized possession (fashion and

Community culture

Your perfect weekend with: Lior Raz
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Your perfect weekend with: Lior Raz

Jerusalem-born Raz is the co-creator and lead actor of the Israeli breakout hit show Fauda, which premiered last month as a Netflix Original Series. The political thriller, based on the personal experiences of Raz, his partner, Avi Issacharoff and several of their friends who served in the IDF’s special forces unit, is one of the biggest successes in Israeli television. Raz shared how he would spend his ideal weekend. Follow suit and maybe you'll find inspiration for the next hit Netflix action series.   Thursday First stop  I like to start my day at a small place called Beta Café in Ramat Aviv near my house. I order a double, long machiatto with a carrot juice on the side.   Room with a view When I want to have complete quiet, I head over to the ninth floor of the Crowne Plaza Hotel and sit in the business lounge. It’s the perfect spot for me - with a panoramic view of the beach and the ideal atmosphere for working. It’s where I am writing the second season of Fauda.   © Alon Horesh       Night on the town I love to go eat at Greco. There is a great atmosphere there and delicious food. I also love walking around Jaffa Flea Market and eating at Café Puaa (8 Rabbi Yohanan St, Jaffa) . Then I go out with friends to Suramare. I love the people, the drinks and the hospitality there.   Friday Training day I go train at my gym, Zeus, in the morning. I’ve been working out for Fauda almost every day.   © Shutterstock       Morning at the beach 

If these streets could talk...
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If these streets could talk...

How the woman "obsessed with street names" exposes the history of an entire state. We pass them on our walks to work. Type them into our GPS apps. Write them on envelopes, subscriptions and business cards. Whether a noun, verb or proper name, the addresses pasted in big bold letters on each street sign around Tel Aviv hold years of stories; her story, his story, history.   "Some name their dog Bialik or Begin, while others create a club called Dizzy Frishdon. While arranging meeting points, Jabo is shortened for Jabotinsky and Levi for Levi Eshkol. Sheinkining describes the activities of sitting on the pavements, among the cafés and in the famous Sheinkin garden," explains creative mind, Sharonna Karni Cohen. Without even realizing, Israel's most influential historical figures have become a part of our everyday vernacular. Sharonna dove deeper into the significance behind the street names of Tel Aviv, with an ambitious project in mind: to expose the rich Jewish history that follows us around town, down every alley, one-way street and boulevard.   Her spark was lit in a quaint University lecture room in Bristol, England, during a presentation on physical Zionism. Sharonna was studying politics and sociology at the time, and the concept of 'physical' Zionism made her laugh because she had always associated Zionism with books and intellectual endeavors.   "When we learned that Nordau was the co-founder of physical Zionism," Sharonna shares, "I laughed even harder because

Your perfect weekend with: Talula Bonet
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Your perfect weekend with: Talula Bonet

Tal Kallai is not simply a gorgeous, sassy and stylish drag queen, but also a talented young actor, performing in clubs, parties, and on stage at Habima, Israel’s National Theatre, where her one (wo)man show runs regularly. Expect singing, dancing, emotional and funny monologues – and absolutely flawless make up, of course. It’s no surprise that Talula is huge, even in Japan. Find out how she spends her weekend when not abroad.   Thursday Mr. & Mrs. Lee This small and homey, yet fancy restaurant serves upscale Asian cuisine. Chef Shaul Ben Aderet created an incredibly varied and meticulously prepared menu, which makes every visit to the restaurant a fabulous experience. The professional service, enchanting atmosphere and perfect food turn each meal into pure pleasure. (Park Tzameret, 10 Nisim Aloni St, Tel Aviv)   © PR       Habima Theatre The repertoire of Israel’s National Theater  is a mosaic of plays. From classics like Coriolanus and Hamlet by Shakespeare, Chekhov’s Three Sisters and Shai Agnon’s A Simple Story to comedies like What To Do With Jenny and spectacular musicals like Les Miserables, the list is endless. Be sure to check which shows have English subtitles and go experience the best of Israeli theater. It’s worth it. (Habima Theatre, 2 Tarsat Blvd, Tel Aviv)   Friday Peacock A bar with great food, where you can order a variety of dishes mostly from Georgian cuisine. The young and lively atmosphere captures the real Tel Avivian bohemian vibe making it the pe

'Tubi or not Tubi?' – Mr. Tubi reveals the truth behind his mysterious beverage and its subculture
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'Tubi or not Tubi?' – Mr. Tubi reveals the truth behind his mysterious beverage and its subculture

A large bottle of cloudy yellow alcohol is carefully placed down on a wooden bistro table in Downtown Haifa. The bottle features a simple black and white label that reads 'pure happiness', among a list of vague ingredients and other relevant information. The bottle is not plopped down haphazardly, but rather placed in the kind of gentle manner that can only come from someone who appreciates the time and effort that went into producing their craft.   The bottle is Tubi 60, an Israeli spirit made in the bay city of Haifa. It seemingly came out of nowhere, and took the Tel Aviv party scene by storm back in 2013. The man is Hilal Tubi, one of the two mastermind brothers behind the wildly popular liquor that inspired the cult-like following from the get-go, the novelty of which has not yet worn-off.   © Tom Hooliganov       Tubi’s brand has been cloaked in mystery, rife with misinformed whispers and flashy myths made-up in desperation, as a result of his shying away from the spotlight, and perhaps ignoring a few important phone calls. But, according to Hilal, Tubi 60 belongs to the community of loyal customers and friends who support it, as much as it does him. Like most successful brands, his comes from the inside-out. He sells an experience more than a product, and the Tubi generation perpetuates that.   Now, as they prepare to release Tubi 60 on the international market, the little Israeli drink that could, will be available for purchase in the States (it is a

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