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(c) LuYang
(c) LuYang

Major art exhibitions in London we can’t wait to see in autumn 2022

All the leaves are brown, but the art is, like, really colourful

Written by
Eddy Frankel
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The London art world takes a long break over August so all the curators and dealers can go sun themselves in St Tropez. They deserve a break. But come autumn, it’s all guns blazing, full steam ahead with exhibitions. Big museum shows in September? You’ve got it. Major art fairs in October? Um, yes. Neat little commercial gallery shows November? Done. So here are the shows that make us super excited for sweaters and pumpkin spice latte weather. 

Can’t wait? Here are the ten best exhibitions to see right now

London art exhibitions opening in autumn 2022

  • Art
  • Bankside

This major retrospective of the Slovakian artist’s work concentrates on her output from 1960s onwards, when she first started making plaster sculptures by pouring the liquid into rubber balloons. She would then shape it either by hand or by submerging it in water, resulting in a series of beautifully delicate sculptures that often look like egg shells, spiders’ webs or birds’ nests. The artist also liked to photograph her creations in natural settings, highlighting their connection to the rural landscape. Summary: gorgeous, one-of-a-kind art by an artist deserving greater recognition. 

  • Art
  • Chalk Farm

Combining anime, videogames, sci-fi and aspects of traditional spiritual belief, Chinese artist LuYang’s new exhibition promises to be a technological, immersive wonderland. All based around their digital avatar DOKU, this exhibition will feature a series of video works as well as an arcade section where visitors will be able to play a videogame version of the project.

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  • Art
  • Bankside

Paul Cézanne is one of the true giants of art history. His loose, radical, obsessive approach to painting paved the way for modernism and abstraction, and continues to shape art today. This huge, ambitious show promises to look at every aspect of his varied career, from his still lifes, his bather paintings and his repeated return to his native Aix-en-Provence to paint Mont Sainte Victoire over and over again. Beautiful, revolutionary art. 

  • Art
  • Barbican

This autumn, the Barbican Curve Gallery is being filled with portraits of feminist icons from pre-Revolution Iran by Soheila Sokhanvari. The miniature paintings will be hung against backdrops inspired by Islamic geometric art, turning the whole gallery into a meditative space of celebration and worship. 

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  • Art
  • Bloomsbury

It has been exactly 200 years since some very clever people figured out how to decipher ancient Egyptian writing, and this major new immersive exhibition at the British Museum celebrates that moment. With objects on loan from around the world – including 'The Enchanted Basin', a huge black granite sarcophogus – the exhibition will explore how the Rosetta Stone opened up a window into history that had remained tightly closed for thousands of years. 

  • Art
  • Piccadilly

You've got to wade throughout a lot of male names in the history of modernism before you get to any women, but they were there, and they were pivotal. This show aims to celebrate three of those women – Paula Modersohn-Becker, Käthe Kollwitz, Gabriele Münter and Marianne Werefkin – all working in Germany in the early twentieth century, and all having a huge impact on the birth of modernism. 

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  • Art
  • Bankside

Magdalena Abakanowicz’s ‘Abkans’ are massive woven sculptures that look like the type of bizarre, organic creation you’d expect to discover buried in the deepest reaches of a rain forest. Made in the 60s and 70s, the ‘Abkans’ cemented the artist’s reputation - as well they should’ve, because these towering, raw shapes are absolutely brilliant. And, as luck would have it, you can see a whole load of them in Tate Modern’s huge Blavatnik Building this Autumn. If that wasn’t reason enough to go, they’re also showing some of the Polish artist’s other large-scale works, including ‘War Games’, sculptures making use of felled tree trunks. 

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