Worldwide icon-chevron-right Europe icon-chevron-right United Kingdom icon-chevron-right England icon-chevron-right London icon-chevron-right Free art in London

Free art in London

See great free art in London without splashing the cash on an admission fee

By Time Out London Art |
Advertising

Looking at great art needn't cost the same as buying great art. With a shed-load of free art exhibitions in London, wandering through sculptures, being blinded by neon or admiring some of the best photography in London needn't cost a penny. Here's our pick of the best free art exhibitions this week and beyond.

RECOMMENDED: explore our full guide to free London

Free art exhibitions in London

Luchita Hurtado 'Untitled' (1969) Image courtesy of the artist. Photo Credit: Jeff McLane
Art

Luchita Hurtado: I Live I Die I Will Be Reborn

icon-location-pin Serpentine Gallery, Knightsbridge
icon-calendar

The female gaze is a funny thing. Three little words used to describe everything from lesbian erotic fiction to the abstract expressionism of Lee Krasner. What’s missing from all this talk about ‘the gaze’ is any sense of a physical human being doing the looking. Enter: Luchita Hurtado.

Time Out says
Sarah Cockings & Harriet Fleuriot 'Plasma Vista' (2016) © the artists
Art

Sarah Cockings & Harriet Fleuriot: Another Funny Turn

icon-location-pin Block 336, Stockwell
icon-calendar

Wandering bushes, two-faced hedges, burbling baths of purple water and spinning tornadoes of hair: Sarah Cockings and Harriet Fleuriot’s mesmerising show is a heady, trippy nightmare, a weird voyage into the surreal depths of the countryside. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Photography by Paul Salveson. Image courtesy of Nevine Mahmoud and Soft Opening, London.
Art

Nevine Mahmoud: Belly Room

icon-location-pin Soft Opening, Bethnal Green
icon-calendar

There’s stuff happening in Nevine Mahmoud’s first European solo show. Sensual, tactile stuff; sexual, bodily stuff. You feel like you’re walking in on a seriously private moment, bodies caught midway through something you maybe shouldn’t be seeing. There are just five sculptures here – all tits, butts and tongues made of marble and glass –  but they are totally lovely. 

Time Out says
Kate Cooper 'Infection Drivers' (2018) Image courtesy of the Artist
Art

Kate Cooper

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
icon-calendar

Your body is a battleground. Capitalism wants to own it, society wants to control it. In Kate Cooper’s three-screen installation, female bodies are constrained and manipulated, abused and deformed; they are the sites of war. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Copyright Denzil Forrester. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.
Art, Contemporary art

Denzil Forrester: A Survey

icon-location-pin Stephen Friedman, Mayfair
icon-calendar

Denzil Forrester’s paintings don’t look like the kind of art you normally find in contemporary galleries. They aren’t full of nods to art history, they’re not drenched in conceptual theorising and they don’t fit neatly into the canon of Western art history. Basically, they don’t look exactly like everything else. And thank fuck for that, because that’s what makes them great. 

Time Out says
Prabhavathi Meppayil, detail of 'I/forty four' (2019) © the artist. Image courtesy of Pace Gallery
Art

Prabhavathi Meppayil: Recent Works

icon-location-pin Pace Burlington Gardens, Mayfair
icon-calendar

Some art screams and shouts its existence, but other art stakes its claim a little more quietly. Prabhavathi Meppayil’s art is of the silent type. The Indian artist creates ultra-minimal white canvases, totally monochrome but highly textured works that are so subtle they’re barely there. 

Time Out says
Advertising
'Kathy Acker in conversation with Angela McRobbie at the Institute of Contemporary Arts' (1987). © ICA, London
Art

I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker

icon-location-pin ICA, St James'
icon-calendar

The writer Kathy Acker (1947-1997) meant a lot of things to a lot of people. And she still does, as this sensory-overload of an exhibition at the ICA makes clear. Split across two floors, the show swirls together chunks of Acker’s own prolific output (mainly large segments of text or video footage of the writer talking or performing) with artworks, poems and films by an extra-long list of artists she’s inspired. 

Time Out says
Mohamed Melehi 'Untitled' (1975). Image courtesy of Barjeel Art Foundation, photographed by CapitalD.
Art

New Waves: Mohamed Melehi and the Casablanca Art School

icon-location-pin The Mosaic Rooms, Earls Court
icon-calendar

It’s always nice when art comes along and rips you out of your comfort zone, drags you out of your knowledge bubble and tears you from the established canon. You get so used to your idea art coming from books and museums, and being so proscriptive as a result, that it can all get a little staid sometimes. But then something like this Mohamed Melehi exhibition shows up and gives you a bit of a jolt. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Mandy El-Sayegh at Chisenhale Gallery by Andy Keate
Art

Mandy El-Sayegh: Cite Your Sources

icon-location-pin Chisenhale Gallery, Mile End
icon-calendar

There’s some serious information overload in Mandy El-Sayegh’s art. News, magazines, the internet, pornography, advertising and poetry are all splashed across the gallery walls, glued and smudged in place. At the root of El-Sayegh's work is a particularly modern condition: how do we navigate a world so inundated with information. 

Time Out says
'Imaginary Cities, study (London)' for British Library Labs residency (2016) © Michael Takeo Magruder
Museums

Imaginary Cities

icon-location-pin British Library, Euston
icon-calendar

 Maps: they’re lush. And the British Library has lots of them. In 2013, it extracted maps from its newly digitised collection of nineteenth-century books and put the results on Flickr. Artist Michael Takeo Magruder has now used these 1 million historical images as the basis for four new artworks. 

Time Out says
Show more

Barnebys Ecomm Widget

More to explore

Snap up exclusive discounts in London

Time Out's handpicked deals — hurry, they won't be around for long...

Advertising