London art exhibitions calendar

Our handy collection of all the big, small and scary art exhibitions coming to town in 2018
Courtesy Cindy Sherman, Metro Pictures and Spruth Magers
By Time Out London Art |
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Hello eager art friend, want to do some planning ahead? Well, you've come to the right place with our one-stop shop for all the art exhibitions, big or small, coming to London in 2018 over the next couple of months. From exciting new gallery openings to upcoming London photography shows, keep your eyes peeled and your paintbrush poised for as much art as your diary can handle. Or, if you can’t wait that long, here's the best new art in London this week to satisfy those creative cravings sooner. 

Art Opening This Month

'Market Place, Goa'. (March 2018) Photograph by Grace Wales Bonner
Art

Grace Wales Bonner

icon-location-pin Serpentine Gallery, Knightsbridge
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Multi-sensory installation by fashion designer Grace Wales Bonner broadly based around a series of 'shrines' created by Kapwani Kiwanga, Eric N. Mack, Paul Mpagi Sepuya and Wales Bonner herself. Along with the physical objects, the Serpentine will also host a series of meditation workshops by the musician Laraaji throughout the course of the exhibition. Mysticism, spirituality, African-American aesthetics and university clothing are all referenced in this show which precurses Wales Bonner's upcoming Autumn/Winter 2019 fashion collection. 

Hanna Moon 'Me and Tyrone for A Nice Magazine Issue 2' (2015) © Hanna Moon
Museums

Hanna Moon & Joyce Ng: English as a Second Language

icon-location-pin Somerset House, Temple
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Somerset House injects some joy into the dark month of January with this inspired exhibition of work by fashion photographers Hanna Moon and Joyce Ng. The London-based duo present a series of snaps questioning buzzword du jour 'diversity' and what 'otherness' means to two women using models, props and imagery connected to their Asian heritage. 

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Hyon Gyon 'Flame' (2010). Private Collection
Art

Hyon Gyon

icon-location-pin Parasol Unit, Hoxton
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Korean shamanism and intense emotions of rage, sorrow and anguish inspire the artworks of Hyon Gyon. The artist's fascinating practice includes using a soldering iron on lengths of traditional Korean satin. The fabric slowly melts and liquifies in the heat, creating an intoxicating result somewhere between beauty and violence. This is the first time a European gallery has staged a solo exhibition of her art. 

Image courtesy of Larry Achiampong and David Blandy
Art

Genetic Automata: Larry Achiampong and David Blandy

icon-location-pin Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology, St Pancras
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Collaboration between artists Larry Achiampong and David Blandy looking at race and identity in the era of advanced video games and DNA profiling. The film-based works are partly inspired by Charles Darwin and his work with taxidermist John Edmonstone, a freed slave whose contribution to Darwin's research has largely been written out of history.

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Miroslaw Balka 'Die Traumdeutung/ 25, 31m AMSL at White Cube (2014). © the artist. Photo © Jack Hems. Image courtesy of White Cube
Art

Miroslaw Balka: Random Access Memory

icon-location-pin White Cube Mason's Yard, St James'
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The last time White Cube showed an artwork by Miroslaw Balka, it was a floor-to-ceiling rope of used soap in the group show, Memory Palace. This time, the artist's solo show features a huge installation made up of two metal walls heated to 45 degrees - also known as the maximum temperature the human body can tolerate before Bad Things start to happen to it. The work deliberately creates a sense of oppression for gallery visitors in response to global political events. It will also warm you up just as the mercury starts to plummet in late January.

Daria Martin 'Tonight the World' (2018) © Daria Martin. Image courtesy of Maureen Paley, London
Art

Daria Martin: Tonight the World

icon-location-pin Barbican Centre, Barbican
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New installation in the Barbican's Curve by video artist Daria Martin. The installation is inspired by dream diaries kept by the artist's grandmother, a survivor of the Holocaust. 

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Image courtesy of Raqs Media Collective and Frith Street Gallery
Art

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

icon-location-pin Frith Street Gallery, Soho
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When soldiers from the Indian subcontinent recorded their first-hand experiences of the First World War, officials were unsettled by the 'excess of poetry' in their accounts. This new installation from Raqs Media Collective considers the consequences of ignoring wartime trauma, using their writings and many others to create a reflective dreamscape.

'Segment of aself' (detail) for Switching Perceptions by Eleanor Minney (2018). Image courtesy of Bethlem Gallery_1.jpg
Art

Switching Perceptions

icon-location-pin Bethlem Gallery and Museum of the Mind, West Wickham
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This collaboration between artist Eleanor Minney, Oxford Prof Liz Tunbridge and patients at Bethlem Royal Hospital centres on art exploring self-identity. Among other items on display is a four-metre-long textile work covered in hand-drawn objects relating to self and images of genetic markers.  

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© Pierre Bonnard, 'Coffee' (1915), Tate.
Art

Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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It's been 20 years since UK art fans last got a chance to enjoy a major exhibition of Pierre Bonnard's delectably, delicately coloured artworks. Tate Modern have taken the title of this 2019 blockbuster exhibition from the French artist's preferred practice of working from memory (which is good, because as anyone who's read the story of Lizzie Siddal and Millais' Ophelia knows, asking models to pose for long periods in a bathtub can have unwanted consequences).

Installation view of Morag Keil, 'passive aggressive', Eden Eden, Berlin (2016). Image courtesy of the artist and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin. Photo: Henry Trumble
Art

Morag Keil: Moarg Kiel

icon-location-pin ICA, St James'
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Video installations and other works by contemporary artist Morag Keil. The London-based artist is interested in how advertising sells us everything we never needed, along with gender roles, escapism and social media. 

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Art Opening Next Month

Tracey Emin 'It was all too Much' (2018) © Tracey Emin. All rights reserved, DACS 2017. Photo © White Cube (Theo Christelis)
Art

Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears

icon-location-pin White Cube Bermondsey, The Borough
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From *that* unmade bed to the recent fluoro lettering stretching waaaaay across St Pancras station, Tracey Emin has established herself as one of the most famous and fascinating artists in Britain. The whole of White Cube Bermondsey is being given over to former YBA in 2019. It's going to be MAJOR as art shows go and filled with her beautiful, sensual pink-tinted nudes. Go see.

Dorothea Tanning 'Eine Kleine Nachtmusik' (1943) © DACS, 2018
Art

Dorothea Tanning

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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The wonderfully weird world of Dorothea Tanning comes to Tate Modern with this large show of artworks created across seven decades. The surrealist artist's paintings are well represented here, as are the soft and bulbous sculptures from the latter parts of her career. Make sure you save time to check out the large-scale installation, 'Chambre 202, Hotel du Pavot', a hotel room invaded by contorted body parts coming through the walls. Sweet dreams! 

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Diane Arbus 'Jack Dracula at a bar, New London, Conn. 1961'. Promised Gift of Doon Arbus and Amy Arbus, 2007 Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York/ Copyright © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Art

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
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Diane Arbus's photographs remain some of the most striking, tender and unnerving portraits ever taken. This new show at the Hayward Gallery focuses on the earlier years of the iconic photographer's career (1956 - 62), presenting almost 100 images, many of which have never been displayed in Europe before. 

Kader Attia 'La Piste d’Atterrissage (The Landing Strip)' (2000) Series of c-print photographs. Image courtesy of the artist. © Kader Attia
Art

Kader Attia: The Museum of Emotion

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
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Kader Attia gets a well deserved major survey exhibition at the Hayward Gallery. The artist's works provide sensitive and thought-provoking reflections on collective memory, regeneration and post-colonialism. One of the show's highlights is a series based on the concept of 'repair', both for nations and individuals, following periods of deep trauma. 

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© Franz West Privatstiftung
Art

Franz West

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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Art galleries can be scary places. The walls are so white, the rooms are so silent and the eagle-eyed gallery attendants are just there to bark orders at you like 'PLEASE DON'T TOUCH THE ARTWORKS.' Enter Franz West and his Passstücke (Adaptives): papier-mâché sculptures designed to be handled. These irreverent, abstract works and many others are included in this major retrospective of West at Tate Modern. So go in, pick them up, move around and make some noise. It's what the artist would have wanted. 

Phyllida Barlow 'demo' Kunsthalle Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland (2017). Image courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. © Phyllida Barlow. Photo: Annik Wetter Photographie
Art

Phyllida Barlow

icon-location-pin Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair
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A new (and almost certainly massive) installation from Phyllida Barlow, an artist who specialises in creating sculptural artworks out of mundane materials like cardboard and discarded wood. We don't know much about it, but it's likely to create a striking contrast with the genteel surroundings of the RA. 

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Nicholas Hilliard 'Man Among Flames'. Image courtesy of National Portrait Gallery
Art

Elizabethan Treasures: Miniatures by Hilliard and Oliver

icon-location-pin National Portrait Gallery, Leicester Square
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Get ruff and ready with the National Portrait Gallery when it exhibits an exquisite collection of miniatures from the Tudor and Jacobean eras. The super-detailed artworks by Nicholas Hilliard and Isaac Oliver take gallery-goers back to a time when owning these teeny tiny pictures was part of a complex system of love, friendship, patronage and more. It's a rare opportunity to see these Borrowers-sized treasures, with a whole section dedicated to pictures of England's Virgin Queen. Just make sure you don't forget your glasses. 

Harald Sohlberg 'Sun Gleam' (1894) Gard forsikring, Arendal
Art

Harald Sohlberg: Painting Norway

icon-location-pin Dulwich Picture Gallery, Dulwich Village
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Painter of an artwork popularly considered the 'National Painting of Norway', Harald Sohlberg made an artistic career out of capturing his native country in all its snow-tipped glory. This nice bit of programming by the DPG is the first major show of Sohlberg's works outside of Norway and it corresponds with the 150th anniversary of his birth. Expect some truly lovely landscapes, lushly coloured and soaked in woodland light. 

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© Don McCullin
Art

Don McCullin

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Westminster
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Don McCullin is one of Britain's most prolific photographers, with a career that has taken him across the globe. Tate Britain now displays over 250 images snapped and printed by McCullin. The locations range from the war zones of Syria and Vietnam to the haunting landscapes of Somerset, where the photographer now lives.

© Ian Kiaer. Image courtesy of Alison Jacques Gallery, London
Art

Ian Kiaer: Endnote ping

icon-location-pin Alison Jacques, Fitzrovia
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Artist Ian Kiaer's recent solo exhibition in Paris was titled 'Endnote tooth', this related show is also called 'Endnote', but with the 'tooth' switched to 'ping', a reference to a Samuel Beckett short story. The exhibition also looks at visionary architecture and features multi-layer paintings using plexiglass previously found in London bus shelters. 

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Future Art Exhibitions

© Frank Bowling
Art

Frank Bowling

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Westminster
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Frank Bowling gets a much-deserved major exhibition at Tate Britain. The artist's long-running career has seen him develop a unique style fusing abstraction with elements of figurative art. Londoners are in for a treat with this show which includes the artist's stunning 'map paintings' and his 'poured paintings' (created by literally pouring paint down a canvas). Whatever you do, don't miss the opportunity to see these gorgeously-coloured artworks in all their glory. 

© The State Tretyakov Gallery
Art

Natalia Goncharova

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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In her lifetime, Russian artist Natalia Goncharova helped found avant garde modern art movements, worked with Sergei Diaghilev at the Ballet Russes, designed dresses, created theatre set designs and much, much more. This exhibition at Tate Modern is overdue and should help to resurrect her reputation as a major artist you should know about.

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Agnolo Bronzino, 'St. Sebastian' (c.1533) © Museo Nacional Thyssen- Bornemisza, Madrid
Art

The Renaissance Nude

icon-location-pin Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair
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'Get your kit off' has been the rallying cry of generations of artists dating back hundreds of years. The RA brings together a selection of the best ever painted in this show dedicated to the nicest nudes of the Rennaisance. One of the highlights will surely be Titian's 'Venus Rising from the Sea' (the 16th-century version of that Bond girl scene), but don't go just expecting endless recreations of the female form. The RA is promising to hang as many Adams as Eves on the wall here, showing how artists haven't just painted, carved and sketched naked women. They did men, too.  

Bridget Riley 'Blaze 1' National Galleries of Scotland. Long loan in 2017. © Bridget Riley (2016) All Rights Reserved. Image courtesy of Karsten Schubert, London.
Art

Bridget Riley

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
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Look into the painting. Look into the painting for longer. Keep looking into the painting. Look at the painting with the intensity of a heron about to catch a slippery fish. Now: stop looking at the painting. Turn around and walk in a straight line. Ah. Walking it's hard sometimes, isn't it? Bridget Riley, Queen of Op Art, gets a big solo show at Hayward Gallery in autumn 2019 and it's going to be filled with the British artist's famous perception-altering artworks from across seven decades. 

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Helene Schjerfbeck, 'Self-Portrait, Black Background' (1915)Herman and Elisabeth Hallonblad Collection. Finnish National Gallery / Ateneum Art Museum; photo: Finnish National Gallery / Yehia Eweis
Art

Helene Schjerfbeck

icon-location-pin Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair
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Go on, say it. 'Who?' Helene Schjerbeck, that's who and, hopefully come 2019 you'll never need to ask again. Helene Schjerbeck might not be that well known outside her native Finland, but her paintings cry out for greater recognition. Over the course of a long career, Schjerbeck skipped lightly between different artistic trends and traditions, creating stunning self-portraits and many intimate images of her female friends and relatives. The Finnish Laura Knight, perhaps? Find out with this great bit of programming by the Royal Academy.

Lee Krasner 'Icarus' (1964) Thomson Family Collection, New York City. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Image courtesy of Kasmin Gallery, New York. Photo: Diego Flores
Art

Lee Krasner: Living Colour

icon-location-pin Barbican Centre, Barbican
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Retrospective of the innovative abstract expressionist artist Lee Krasner. As the title suggests, one reason for buying a ticket is to check out Krasner's vivid, large-scale canvases that explode in fireworks of colour. But that not all. You'll also be able to see her superb charcoal drawings and some early self-portraits. The Barbican aims to stop Krasner always being mentioned in the same breath as her husband (also an artist). So we're not even going to say his name.

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Paul Gauguin 'Self-Portrait Dedicated to Carrière' (1888 or 1889). Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon (1985.64.20) Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.
Art

Gauguin Portraits

icon-location-pin National Gallery, Trafalgar Square
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The art of Paul Gauguin isn't exactly unknown (to say the least), yet there's never been an exhibition exclusively of his portraiture - until now. See how the artist put his own twist on the traditional genre of painting as he walked away from impressionism and dove into the murky seas of symbolism. 

Edvard Munch 'On the Waves of Love'. Image courtesy of Munchmuseet
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Edvard Munch: Love and Angst

icon-location-pin British Museum, Bloomsbury
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It's the exhibition whoever invented the scream emoji has been waiting for. The British Museum stages a huge exhibition of Norway's most famous painter, Edvard Munch. The show, which includes major loans from the Munch Museum in Oslo, will focus on the artist's prints and his unique ability to crystalise intense human emotions like grief, sorrow, jealousy and desire - you know, the ones we felt long before we had the emojis to represent them.

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Henry Moore 'Helmet Head No.1 1950 bronze (LH 279 cast 5)'. Photograph ©Tate, London 2018 Artwork reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation
Art

Henry Moore: The Helmet Heads

icon-location-pin Wallace Collection, Marylebone
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This neat little bit of exhibition planning brings Henry Moore's 'Helmet Head' sculptures back to the very institution that inspired them. Recent research has discovered how the sculptor used the Wallace Collection's archive of armour as inspiration for his 20th-century creations. You can now compare Moore's works with the Renaissance-era pieces he studied when coming to the Wallace Collection during the 30s and 40s. 

© Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Jens Ziehe. Boros Collection, Berlin, Germany.
Art

Olafur Eliasson

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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In 2003, visitors to Tate Modern went mad for Olafur Eliasson's Turbine Hall installation 'The Weather Project'. The artist is now back at the same galley with a big exhibition and an outside artwork. He's even taking over the Terrace Bar, turning it into a vegetarian canteen. 

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Find our favourite art exhibitions on now

© Tristan Fewings/Getty Images
Art

Top ten art exhibitions in London

Fancy seeing an art show this weekend but no idea where to go? Well look no further. You can't go wrong if you head down to one of our ten favourite art exhibitions taking place in the capital right now.

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