27 Love It
Save it

This week's best art

All the best current art exhibitions and shows to hunt down in London

Alex Hartley, 'A Gentle Collapsing II', courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro.

Fancy checking out some art this week but don't know where to start? Have a flick through our selection of the best shows on at the moment and take your pick. With galleries spread all over the city and an art scene as changeable as London's, we've divided it into areas to help keep track. Everything featured below got a shiny four or five-star review from us, but check out all the latest art reviews for more. 

Lubaina Himid

4 out of 5 stars

Based on traditional African stringed instruments, the banjo came to life in the hands of enslaved Africans in the Caribbean before finding its feet in the poor American South. Now, it’s a ubiquitous symbol of white redneckery. So when you encounter two banjo cases daubed with hand-painted slogans in Lubaina Himid’s first show of new work since winning the Turner Prize last year you’d better believe they’re carrying some serious symbolism. 

Read more
Hollybush Gardens , Clerkenwell Until Saturday March 24 2018

Eloise Hawser: By the Deep, By the Mark

3 out of 5 stars

Like the proverbial iceberg, Eloise Hawser’s new exhibition is more about what lurks beneath the water than above it. Dredging up data on H20 from historical records, medical imaging and the sewerage system, the idea is to show a connection between the passage of water in the Thames and the flow of fluid in our bodies. 

Read more
Somerset House , Temple Until Sunday April 22 2018
Advertising

Yto Barrada: Agadir

3 out of 5 stars

An earthquake has rocked the city of Agadir. Its buildings have crumbled, its people are wandering the streets in shock. How do you rebuild after disaster and tragedy has struck? That’s the question at the heart of a 1967 novel by Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine – ‘Agadir’, based on the 1960 earthquake that hit the Moroccan city – which in turn is the inspiration for Yto Barrada’s new Curve commission. 

Read more
Barbican Centre , Barbican Until Sunday May 20 2018

Glenn Brown: Come to Dust

3 out of 5 stars

Let’s call it appropriating. British artist Glenn Brown has made a whole career out of ‘appropriating’ other people’s images and distorting them into twisted new visions. His work has always made him the focus of enraged debate, and back in 2000 he got sued by sci-fi artist Anthony Roberts for breach of copyright. He’s on safer ground these days, though: the dead can’t get litigious.

Read more
Gagosian Gallery , Mayfair Until Saturday March 17 2018
Advertising

Jules de Balincourt: They Cast Long Shadows

3 out of 5 stars

It takes a while to tie all of Jules de Balincourt’s threads into a coherent visual sweater. The French-American artist’s bright, simple figurative paintings here are filled with boats and planes, thousands of tiny people and enormous, semi-transparent giants. The little people sit in caves, or dance around statues, while the giants seem to watch over it all like ghosts. 

Read more
Victoria Miro Mayfair , Mayfair Until Saturday March 24 2018

Crossroads: Kauffman, Judd and Morris

3 out of 5 stars

Doing a lot with very little was American minimalist Craig Kauffman’s M.O. Here, Sprüth Magers has assembled a small handful of the artist’s (1932-2010) sculptures (and some by his buddies Donald Judd and Robert Morris) to show just how maximally great his minimalism was.

Read more
Sprüth Magers , Mayfair Until Saturday March 17 2018
Advertising

Charles I: King and Collector

5 out of 5 stars

Art’s a matter of taste, and Charles I (1600-1649) knew his Tiziano from his Shitziano. Before he had his head lopped off, the monarch and his wife Henrietta Maria had been avid art buyers and assembled a collection of renaissance paintings to rival any out there – we’re talking Titian, Holbein, Tintoretto, you know, the big guns. 

Read more
Royal Academy of Arts , Mayfair Until Sunday April 15 2018

JR: Giants – Body of Work

3 out of 5 stars

French graffiti artist JR first came to prominence when one of his pieces of ‘pervasive art’ – large photo-prints he hangs or pastes around the streets – appeared in the background of footage from the 2005 Paris riots. He has since become a hot artist to legally commission, and for the 2016 Olympic Games he made enormous prints of athletes jumping over Rio’s buildings, swimming in its ocean, and diving off its mountains like Greek titans.  

Read more
Lazinc , Mayfair Until Wednesday February 28 2018
Advertising
Show more

Gideon Rubin: Black Book

4 out of 5 stars

Gideon Rubin’s family fled the Nazis 80 years ago, just like Sigmund Freud, in whose Hampstead home the artist has secreted a series of new artworks. Most of this show is based on pre-war German magazine images, from which the taint of Nazism has been erased. Swastikas have been removed from the vests of exercising girls, parades have been doctored out of streets, colourful flags have replaced red ones we’d rather forget, but never can, or should. 

Read more
Freud Museum , Frognal Until Sunday April 15 2018

Nancy Rubins: Diversifolia

4 out of 5 stars

Crash, bang and bloody wallop: American artist Nancy Rubins’s vertiginously and worryingly balanced art looks like an explosion in a garden centre. They’re ludicrous, really: huge assemblages of animal sculptures, somehow tethered together into ornate shapes. Silver alligators and stags are strapped to golden giraffes and tigers, forming a sort of zoo-tree mash-up.

Read more
Gagosian Britannia St , St Pancras Until Saturday April 14 2018
Advertising

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming

4 out of 5 stars

Poverty can be enriching, at least when you’re talking about the Italian povera movement of the late ’60s and ’70s  that Giorgio Griffa emerged from. Arte povera was an avant-garde movement that aimed to build a kind of poetry out of scrappy, everyday materials. For Griffa, this meant taking canvas off the frames, dismantling its parts, and developing a kind of stripped-back visual lyricism out of the very building blocks of painting. 

Read more
Camden Arts Centre , Frognal Until Sunday April 8 2018

Rachel Howard: Repetition is Truth – Via Dolorosa

4 out of 5 stars

Humanity's capacity for atrocity was laid bare during the Iraq war when images emerged of the humiliating treatment of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. One showed Ali Shallal al-Qaisi stood on a box, a hood pulled over his head, arms spread wide, with wires attached to his fingers and genitals. A painting of that horrifying act opens Rachel Howard’s show at Newport Street Gallery. 

Read more
Newport Street Gallery , Lambeth Until Monday May 28 2018

David Milne: Modern Painting

4 out of 5 stars

The title of this show might at first seem impossibly broad, but by the end it makes perfect sense: this is the story of one man struggling to figure out what the ‘modern’ world is about, and what possible place painting might have in it. 

Read more
Dulwich Picture Gallery , Dulwich Village Until Monday May 7 2018
Advertising

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch

4 out of 5 stars

Concrete sport pitches are dotted throughout this city like thousands of tarmac scabs that just won’t heal. They’re places for congregating, for fighting, for socialising, for competing: they’re where countless Londoners do their growing up. And Eddie Peake is one of them. He spent his youth near Finsbury Park, doing what kids do on concrete recreation grounds. In this show, he’s reimagined the gallery as a new pitch, a concrete playground for grown-ups. 

Read more
White Cube Bermondsey , The Borough Until Sunday April 8 2018

Andreas Gursky

4 out of 5 stars

The Hayward Gallery reopens after two years with a bang and two-and-a-half floors of photos by German snapper Andreas Gursky. I say ‘snapper’, but obviously he’s an art megastar, whose massive prints sell for millions. And I say a ‘bang’ but it’s more of a vast low-frequency ‘Oooooaaaaauuuuummmmmm’ sort of sound: the sound of things being crushed flat on to photographic paper. 

Read more
Hayward Gallery , South Bank Until Sunday April 22 2018
Advertising

Michael Armitage: The Chapel

4 out of 5 stars

So much of Western art and culture depicts Africa as a vast, dark, incomprehensible continent, somewhere over there, a literal ‘other’.  It’s the heart of darkness, right? But in London-based, Kenyan-born painter Michael Armitage’s show here, East Africa isn’t the ‘other’, it’s just another: not something exotic or far away, but something very, very familiar. 

Read more
Friday February 23 2018

Modigliani

3 out of 5 stars

It’s not often that you get access to the studio of an artist – never mind one who died 97 years ago. But for their new Modigliani exhibition, the Tate has collaborated with a tech company to recreate the Italian artist’s Parisian digs in virtual-reality form. 

Read more
Tate Modern , South Bank Until Monday April 2 2018
Advertising

Mark Dion: Theatre of the Natural World

4 out of 5 stars

‘Wunderkammer’ is a neat little German word. It means a ‘room of wonder’, filled with incredible, awe-inspiring objects and trinkets. Now imagine if that wonder was replaced with something much darker: the truth of humanity’s legacy. US artist Mark Dion has been replacing wonder with ecological misery for his whole career. 

Read more
Whitechapel Gallery , Whitechapel Until Sunday May 13 2018

Find upcoming art shows in London

Comments

1 comments
IIP Foundation

The Indian Institute of Photography wishes you a happy & Colourful Holi !