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Top photography exhibitions in London

Look at life through the lens and find the best new photography exhibitions around London
Best London photos: Wolfgang Tillmans: 'Lars in Tube', 1993. © Wolfgang Tillmans, © Maureen Paley
© Maureen Paley
By Time Out London Art |
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There's so much more to London art than just painting or sculpture – lose yourself in all kinds of new worlds by tracking down the best photography exhibitions in London.

From sweeping landscape scenes to powerful portraits captured by daring individuals, photography in London offers a full-exposure of thought-provoking, visually captivating art. Look away from the Instagram feed for just a minute and go explore.

RECOMMENDED: Check our complete guide to photography in London

 

Top photography exhibitions in London

Dave Heath 'Washington Square, New York' (1960) © Dave Heath / Collection Torosian. Image courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York and Stephen Bulger Gallery, Toronto
Art

Dave Heath: Dialogues with Solitude

icon-location-pin Photographers' Gallery, Soho
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Chances are you haven’t heard of Dave Heath. The American photographer, who quietly documented post-WWII US society, has flown under the radar. This is his first major UK show, and despite only being two rooms, ‘Dialogues with Solitudes’ packs a big emotional punch.

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Magdalene Ball, Cambridge, England, 2015. Picture credit: © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery;
Art

Only Human: Martin Parr

icon-location-pin National Portrait Gallery, Leicester Square
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As Britain’s Self-Loathing Olympics head towards their Closing Ceremony, the country’s favourite documenter of our endlessly conflicted national identity lands at the NPG. This is not a coincidence. Since the referendum result in 2016, photographer Martin Parr has been pointing his lens at various aspects of the nation to investigate, in his word, ‘Brexitness’. 

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Diane Arbus 'Jack Dracula at a bar, New London, Conn. 1961'. Promised Gift of Doon Arbus and Amy Arbus, 2007 Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York/ Copyright © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Art

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
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Diane Arbus was the original people-watcher. Some lads larking around by the coast, a glamorous receptionist at her desk, two women shooting evils at the universe: nothing escaped her notice. The Hayward Gallery’s exhibition of photographs from the first seven years of her career (1956-1962) is sleekly arranged with each small print attached to one side of a tall white rectangle. 

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© Don McCullin
Art

Don McCullin

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Westminster
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Heads up: this is a difficult show. It’s difficult because it documents in crisp detail some of the most shameful aspects of humanity over the last 60-odd years. It’s difficult because a lot of the images here were commissioned by newspapers and magazines to show their readers those shameful aspects of humanity, and were never meant to be coolly appraised in a big art gallery: they were meant to be spattered with the cornflakes you’d just choked over. 

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Hanna Moon 'Me and Tyrone for A Nice Magazine Issue 2' (2015) © Hanna Moon
Art

Hanna Moon & Joyce Ng: English as a Second Language

icon-location-pin Somerset House, Temple
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This joint exhibition is inspired by the Asian-born Londoners’ feeling of being ‘lost in translation’, in their new home and in the fashion industry. 

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© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Art

Shadows of War: Roger Fenton's Photographs of the Crimea 1855

icon-location-pin The Queen's Gallery, St James's Park
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In 1855, Roger Fenton arrived in the Crimea on a commission from publisher Thomas Agnew & Sons to photograph scenes and figures from the ongoing Crimean War. After he returned to London, the images were exhibited at four venues in the capital and… that was it. There hasn’t been a London show of Fenton’s creations since 1856.

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