Game Plan: Board Games Rediscovered

Things to do, Exhibitions Free
5 out of 5 stars
(2user reviews)
1/5
MISC.161-1983 Board game - The Alice Through The Looking Glass Chess Set; carved & painted wood; made by Robin Dale & Neil Dale; U.K.; 1983.
2/5
MISC.161-1983 Board game - The Alice Through The Looking Glass Chess Set; carved & painted wood; made by Robin Dale & Neil Dale; U.K.; 1983.
3/5
B.136:1-2004 Board game Cluedo John Waddington Ltd. England 1950's
 (Keith Parry)
4/5
Keith ParryCIS:CIRC.230-1964
5/5
Misc.39-1977 Board game Monopoly; Printed card board game, Monopoly, made in England by John Waddington Ltd in the late 1930s John Waddington Ltd England 1936-1939 Printed card

A showcase of board games that'll be sure to have you reminiscing about rainy days spent competing with your siblings. Over 100 objects will be on display featuring games from across the globe and some of the most iconic examples from the V&A's collection. Favourites such as Cluedo, Trivial Pursuit and Monopoly will also be included and a number of hands-on activiities will give visitors the chance to become part of the gaming action. 

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Average User Rating

4.5 / 5

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LiveReviews|2
1 person listening

Informative exhibition for those interested in the history, culture and evolution of board games.  Allow an hour to absorb the exhibits which are informed by excellent captions. Note that most children will find the exhibition boring - which is the paradox of the Museum of Childhood. However there are activities for children downstairs. There is no exhibition catalogue so you have to go there in person to absorb the meaning of it all.  Nice to see board games being taken seriously. 

Tastemaker

It's a delight to learn about the origins of different board games and the way their purposes have shifted over time (eg educational, competitive, cooperative). As a bonus, there's a selection of board games to play at certain times; it's worth checking the schedule of events. Given the amount of text explaining the exhibits, this may be one for the older children or the adults rather than the very little ones.