Get us in your inbox

Search
Sanguich de Miami
Photograph: Courtesy Sanguich de Miami/Ruben Cabrera

Where to find the best Cuban sandwich in Miami

You’ll find Miami’s most iconic dish everywhere but they’re not all great. These are the spots making the best Cubano.

Virginia Gil
Written by
Virginia Gil
Advertising

What’s the first thing people-in-the-know do when they arrive in the Magic City? Not hit the best Miami beaches. Smart—and hungry— tourists fresh off the plane make a beeline to the nearest Cuban restaurant for a taste of the city’s most famous sandwich. But locals love Cubanos too. There’s nothing like crunching down on toasty bread and juicy pork. What qualifies a Cubano to be considered the best Cuban sandwich in Miami? Is it the ham, the roasted pork or both? Should it call for mustard or is plain better? We’re settling the debate by taste-testing the city’s supposed greatest—from South Beach to Little Havana—and ranking our favorites below.

Best Cuban sandwiches in Miami

  • Restaurants
  • Sandwich shops
  • East Little Havana
  • price 1 of 4

After many taste tests, Sanguich de Miami is still the city’s reigning champ. This cozy Cuban cafe in Little Havana doles out a variety of Cuban sandwiches—media noche, pan con bistec, pan con lechón—but its Cubano is what truly put them on the map. Part of the reason why this sandwich is special are the hours of prep that go into making each ingredient before it’s even assembled: the mustard is house-made, the pork is cured in-house, and the bread is baked to Sanguich’s specifications. Once it’s all put together, the Cubano is finished off in la plancha. Recently, Sanguich joined the Goldbelly bunch so now even far-flung friends can enjoy a taste.

  • Restaurants
  • Cuban
  • Midtown
  • price 1 of 4

It can be tempting to dismiss this always-packed Wynwood spot as inauthentic or commercial. What do hipsters know about Cuban food? Well, it turns out they know a lot. Crowds notwithstanding, Enriqueta’s sandwiches are still made to order—and fast! The original sandwich is still the best: It’s very cheesy and pickle-y, which we generally avoid, but the flavors are on point. Order the Doble if you want extra pork or the Preparado (with two croquetas stuffed inside) for something truly indulgent.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Cuban
  • Coral Way
  • price 2 of 4

This local Cuban chain appeals to a younger generation with its low-calorie menu dubbed La Flaca (‘the skinny girl’ in English) and Cuban riffs in classic American dishes, like the cobb salad and assorted flatbreads. What it hasn’t messed with, however, is its Cuban sandwich, which is straightforward and a real-deal sando. If you’re getting it delivered, it arrives wrapped in aluminum foil so your second half stays warm while you work your way through the massive sandwich. 

  • Restaurants
  • Cuban
  • West Little Havana
  • price 2 of 4

It’s dubbed itself the world’s most famous Cuban restaurant, and the Cubano might be the most popular thing on the menu. The original (there’s a special version that’s slightly larger) met all the basic requirements: toasted, filled with the right ingredients and cut perfectly in half. It can be a drippy mess, but we’re here for the excess mustard and juicy pork fat holding it all together.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Sandwich shops
  • Flagami
  • price 1 of 4

When it comes to Cuban sandwiches, this restaurant likes to bend the rules. Mustard is replaced with Sarussi's signature secret sauce—a liquidy version of sofrito with hints of cumin that packs a flavorful punch. The bread tastes more Italian than Cuban, and can be ordered with melted butter brushed on top. Purists be warned: You won’t find a traditional Cubano here, but you’re still getting a stellar sandwich.

Cuban sandwiches are inherently fast food but a fast-food version of the sando didn’t genuinely exist until Pollo Tropical’s hit the market. And before you go doubting the Florida chicken chain’s place in an already crowded space, hear us out. There’s a lot to be said about affordability, accessibility (hello, drive-thru!) and consistency—Pollo scores in all three areas. Beyond being a pragmatic option, Pollo Tropical’s sandwiches are tasty. The bread is a cross between a media noche bread (soft and eggy) and a flattened Cuban loaf so there’s more attention on the filling. It’s available as a standard Cuban sandwich or with fried chicken instead of roasted pork.

Advertising

Cafe might be a misnomer for this massive Cuban restaurant in Brickell, featuring a stocked bar and the neighborhood’s only true ventanita for cafecito. It boasts an equally extensive menu and more than one type of Cubano. We tried the standard sammie, a tall stack of ham, roast pork and Swiss that was almost too big to try in one bite. We really enjoyed the generous slathering of mustard but could have done without a few slices of ham. At under $10, it’s a bargain for a hearty sandwich that easily feeds two hungry people.

  • Restaurants
  • Cuban
  • West Little Havana
  • price 1 of 4

Caribe is part of a small Miami-based chain of Cuban restaurants, where the servings are massive and the prices generally low. The Cuban sandwich is no exception. The meats are piled high (albeit too much to pork for an even ratio) and the bread itself is sliced larger than in other restaurants (it’s also about $1 than the going rate). Come hungry or be prepared to share.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Sandwich shops
  • East Little Havana
  • price 1 of 4

Every once in a while a sandwich shop comes along and tries to do things differently. This “culturally creative” spot offers the most divisive sandwich we sampled, replacing the Cuban bread with a soft roll and adding soppressata. In Tampa where the sandwich supposedly originated, the Cubano includes a slice of Genoa salami, but never in Miami, where it’s frowned upon. Differences aside, we appreciate the soft, pressed bread and like the saltiness of the soppressata, which sort of tastes like bacon.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Cuban
  • East Little Havana
  • price 1 of 4

It doesn’t get more down-home than this Cuban diner in Little Havana. Service is no-frills, portions are generous, and dishes are packed with big flavors. Its location adjacent to Domino Park makes it a favorite stop for neighborhood locals and large groups of tourists exploring the area. The restaurant’s only offense? Skimping on the roasted pork in favor of more ham in their Cubano. The bread is also very crispy, which can go either way depending on your preference.

Sample more of Miami’s tasty Latin food

Recommended
    You may also like
      Advertising