Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right The 20 best-selling postcards from NYC's top museums

The 20 best-selling postcards from NYC's top museums

Here are the 20 best postcards, according to people who visit the Guggenheim, the Met, MoMA and the Whitney

By Howard Halle |
Advertising

A long as there have been museums, there have arguably been museum postcards, though there may be fewer of them being sold these days thanks to the fact that smartphones make it easy to take pictures of the art. However, just as a Kindle doesn’t quite replicate the experience of holding a book, using a tiny screen to look at a Picasso doesn’t have the feel of handling a high-quality reproduction of one, printed on nice, thick cardstock. Which may account for the fact that postcards still do a brisk business at museums in NYC. But have you ever wondered which postcards were the most popular? We did. So we canvased the city’s four biggest museums to find out, and what we discovered was a bit surprising. For instance, many people seem to prefer views of the museums themselves, while works by Van Gogh and Warhol are among the heavily favored. See for yourself with a look at the top museum postcards.

Laura Jean Allen, The New Yorker Cover, March 17, 1975
Courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Laura Jean Allen, The New Yorker cover, March 17, 1975

David Heald, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Oculus
Courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

David Heald, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Oculus

Advertising
Robert E. Mates, Historic view of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Robert E. Mates, Historic view of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Charles E. Martin, The New Yorker Cover, January 24, 1970
Courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Charles E. Martin, The New Yorker cover, January 24, 1970

Advertising
Pablo Picasso, Woman Ironing, 1904
Courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Pablo Picasso, Woman Ironing, 1904

Vincent Van Gogh, Irises, 1890
Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Vincent Van Gogh, Irises, 1890

Advertising
Unicorn in Captivity Tapestry, South Netherlandish, 1495–1505
Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Unicorn in Captivity Tapestry, South Netherlandish, 1495–1505
Vincent Van Gogh, Vase of Roses, 1890
Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Vincent Van Gogh, Vase of Roses, 1890

Advertising
Adolf Dehn, Spring in Central Park, 1941
Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Adolf Dehn, Spring in Central Park, 1941

View of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art

View of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Advertising
Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889
Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art

Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889

Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup Cans, 1962
Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art

Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup Cans, 1962

Advertising
Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of Memory, 1931
Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art

Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of Memory, 1931

Jasper Johns, Flag, 1954-55
Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art

Jasper Johns, Flag, 1954-55

Advertising
Andy Warhol, Untitled from Marilyn Monroe, 1967
Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art

Andy Warhol, Untitled from Marilyn Monroe, 1967

View of the Whitney building
Courtesy the Whitney Museum of American Art

View of the Whitney building

Advertising
Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958
Courtesy the Whitney Museum of American Art

Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958

Georgia O’Keeffe, Music, Pink and Blue No. 2, 1918
Courtesy the Whitney Museum of American Art

Georgia O’Keeffe, Music, Pink and Blue No. 2, 1918

Advertising
Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930
Courtesy the Whitney Museum of American Art

Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930

Edward Hopper, Railroad Sunset, 1929
Courtesy the Whitney Museum of American Art

Edward Hopper, Railroad Sunset, 1929

More to explore

Advertising